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Terminated After Two Months!!

Nurse Beth Article   (32,890 Views 62 Replies 1,091 Words)
by Nurse Beth Nurse Beth, MSN (Advice Column) Writer Innovator Expert

Nurse Beth has 30 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Med Surg, Tele, ICU, Ortho.

15 Followers; 89 Articles; 228,497 Profile Views; 1,838 Posts

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I graduated from a BSN school in June 2015, and since then, I've been through 2 jobs. My first job was at a big well-known hospital. I got hired into their new grad program but was placed on day shift on the busiest floor of the hospital (MS/Tele/Onc). Their training program was about 3 months, but I didn't think it was long enough for me. You are reading page 5 of Terminated After Two Months!!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

EKUGRAD has 42 years experience and specializes in Psychiatric / Forensic Nursing.

65 Posts; 1,365 Profile Views

One of the best decisions I ever made as a nurse was to join the United States Navy Nurse Corps after 1 year out of school. I worked my year at the V.A. that had been more than helpful with schedules while I was in school. I went to work on the same Med-Surg floor where I had been a Nursing Assistant. Joining the Navy (actually any branch Nurse Corps) is a guaranteed, predictable career path. After 6 weeks Indoctrination School (no nursing at all), the new nurse Ensign is assigned a large regional medical center, usually Med-Surg. If you show promise, you may be moved to a critical care unit, ED or surgery. With a BSN, after 1 year you are automatically promoted to Lieutenant Junior Grade. When your initial 2 years are about up, you can choose to stay another 2 years and get an assignment overseas; Rota, Spain; Roosevelt Roads, P.R. come to mind. Of course Hawaii is not considered "overseas" but is "Out of CONUS (Continental US)". After completing overseas duty and getting another promotion, you have pretty much a choice of where to return. If your grades and performance reports are good enough, you may be chosen for Full Time Duty Under Instruction for up to 2 years. When I was in, I was chosen to attend the university of my choice for Masters in Nursing in Critical Care. That's 2 years with full pay and benefits, plus all fees, travel & moving and living costs PAID. 20 years may seem like a long time starting out. But you may retire then with full retirement benefits. I had friends retiring from the Navy Nurse Corps at age 44, starting their "2nd careers" in the civilian world with a Masters and 20 years experience. Almost name your price in job hunting.

No job is perfect for everybody. Contrary to popular belief, EVERY nurse does not start IV's, monitor drips, read cardiac monitors or assist in surgery. Get basic experience in a place where you are appreciated. And, appreciate yourself ! Finishing a BSN is not a stroll down the beach. Take pride and validation in your accomplishment.

 

Believe it or not, my favorite overseas station was Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (before the prison). It was like being paid to live on paradise island. I had my wife and two daughters with me. We lucked out and got housing in a 2800 sq. ft. house overlooking the golf course. Went scuba diving at least 3 days per week. On weekends hospital staff would rent a cabana at one of the big beaches and just hang out all day, coming and going into the night with bon fires. When a deer stepped on a mine the Marines roasted it at the beach and we partied. I worked Med-Surg, E.R., Outpatient Clinic, Active Duty Sick Call, Surgery. Got to go out with Marines on tanks, shoot guns and practice camping skills. As an old commercial once said, "Try it. You might like it".

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I am a new LPN, and I feel like my school did not prepare us at all for the real world. I had at most 3 patients in clinicals, and I have 20 patients in my first job in LTC! It was quite a shock on top of learning all the computer stuff (they have a terrible computer program, different than the normal one, you have to enter things 2 to 3 different places, they don't flow automatically). I feel like they taught us to only pass the boards pretty much. The place I work is chronically short-staffed and the training is inadequate but I feel like if I can do this I can work anywhere after this first year. Some nights are great, but some nights I have charting for 1-1 1/2 hours after all the work is done. You learn to prioritize and manage your time. I really wish I had a mentor though, I work 3p-11p and there is not any other nurse except the RN supervisor who is too busy to do much except respond to emergencies. Hang in there, I don't have experience to respond to your question too much but LTC is probably a good start for a year. Good luck!!

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I am so sorry all this happened to you!

First, there is a national nurse movement about safe staffing - and your experience shows exactly why. A nurse cannot do more than what he/she has time to do. And a trainer/mentor can only help another nurse grow if his/her s patient load allows it. You have been a victim of poor management planning and execution of safe staffing.

The same goes for your needlestick injury. Nurses are in situations where they have to use dangerous objects in unstable situations. Police are given vests, and firefighters breathing apparatus. Construction workers are given hard hats and steel-toed shoes. But they just tell nurses to "be careful." Studies have shown the safest devices have passive retraction. I'll bet they did not provide safe devices, but then blamed you.

I can see by your letter that you care and you want the best for your patients. That makes you a great nurse. Unfortunately, the industry does not value your strengths as well as they should. Hang in there. You will find your place. I believe in you.

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1 Article; 2 Posts; 747 Profile Views

Hi,

I've been a licensed nurse approximately 25 years. I also have 3 college degrees. I'd suggest home health nursing, or hospice nursing. That might reduce some of the stress, etc.

Best Wishes,

Patrick

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I worked in surgery after graduation, and this was crazy busy. I then worked orthopedics on the floor for 5 years. This was a much better fit. We aren't trained in surgery during RN school. I will however confess it has helped me with patients teaching. I have also worked med. Surg., allergy and asthma clinic, and long term care. After 26 years I have learned with each position I have held. I now work at a rehab center . This gives me a good balance between challenges, and not getting too overwhelmed. Bless you in your indeavers.

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2 Posts; 151 Profile Views

I worked in surgery after graduation, and this was crazy busy. I then worked orthopedics on the floor for 5 years. This was a much better fit. We aren't trained in surgery during RN school. I will however confess it has helped me with patients teaching. I have also worked med. Surg., allergy and asthma clinic, and long term care. After 26 years I have learned with each position I have held. I now work at a rehab center . This gives me a good balance between challenges, and not getting too overwhelmed. Bless you in your indeavers.

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Dear Disheartened,

You sound like an honest, caring and compassionate nurse. The two errors you describe, unfortunately, resulted in negative consequences for the patients. But, you are not solely to blame. During your first job on the MS/TELE/ONC unit, you were overwhelmed after your 3 month orientation. The fact that you received an extra month of orientation, is proof that management was aware of your anxiety, and needed a more prolonged training period. We all learn at different rates and in different ways. You successfully completed nursing school and I assume passed your boards. That being said, you have the ability to learn the complexities of patient care. Your second job as Case Manager, was way over your skill level, considering you were basically a new grad, 6 months post nursing school graduation. Your assessment and critical thinking skills still needed honing so as to be able to apply them to different patient care scenarios. The lack of available staff to provide you with proper orientation/training in this specialized field is what led to the error. With all this said, I do hope you felt comfortable to request assistance when you were feeling overwhelmed and under prepared to perform your job. It is ultimately up to us as individuals to request help when we need it, so as to provide safe patient care. Don't give up on yourself or on your chosen nursing career. Be patient with yourself. With more time and experience under your belt, you will grow into your role as a nurse. All the best to you. Monaco

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I do not recommend Correctional Care either, it can be very stressful. Emergencies, chronic diseases and sometimes difficult and unusual disease processes can present and and without experience and good judgment can cause problems. Some inmates are quick to sue and bring legal action.

Behavioral health is good if you don't want to practice medical hands-on nursing, however those skills are important in case of medical issues.

I recommend a year of Med-surg.

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I would love advice as well! I'm a new nurse and lost my job after orienting to a unit for a 3 month period. I would like to send Nurse Beth a PM, but as a new member of allnurses I am unable to do so. I feel that disclosing my situation in a public forum is not a wise choice because I fear discrimination. In my case, no patients were harmed and there were no accidents or errors made. Perhaps someone could PM me?

Thank you in advance!

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Hi TheCommuter,

I too am a Type B personality, and am hoping for a slower-paced environment when I get out of nursing school. Do you have any recommendations? I am starting to worry about what I am reading about working in hospitals.

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A bad experience can be difficult to overcome, but can definitely set you up for a great future. I work for JBR Healthcare and we are always looking for new talent. I would love to discuss a further opportunity with you. Feel free to contact me at ambrielle.rison@jbennettrecruiting.com

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I've been in the same situation, having been terminated from 3 of my 5 RN positions. It was never due to major errors, more like personality conflicts. I'm now back at the home health job I love. That being said, home health is NOT the place for a new grad, or someone with minimal experience. You are basically on your own. I had 1 week of on the job training, plus 1 week of computer training, and I was on my own. We have had a high turnover because people think home health isn't that difficult or stressful. There have been days I've cried from the overload, or fallen asleep with my tablet on my lap while documenting. The pay is WAY better than what I've made in any hospital, including the ER, but you put in major hours to get it. It's not for everyone. LTC would be a good place to get settled and confident.

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