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Switching Careers - Architect to Nurse

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by cmckee cmckee (New) New

510 Profile Views; 3 Posts

Hello!

I've been in the field of architecture for 10 years and i'm deciding to make a career shift. I've always found it too impersonal and I'm ready to move on. I took my first pre-req for nursing last year but have been second guessing things after I have talked with some nurses/people who have nurses in their family that say it's way too repetitive and hierarchical (dealing with doctors/surgeons and not being able to make many decisions) I was interested in nursing because of the human connection, the flexibility within the field (types of Nursing Jobs) and the schedule.

I'm feeling a little hesitant to jump into something completely new and certainly with very little overlap when I'm hearing some negative feedback - any comments/advice would be greatly appreciated!

thanks!

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215 Posts; 5,292 Profile Views

Don't do it. It is really not worth it. You will have no autonomy, no money and no life. Can't you find a way to make architecture more satisfying for you? Or perhaps get your human contact and altruistic feelings through volunteering? There are so many services that could use the help.

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10 Posts; 781 Profile Views

It is a very personal decision and you will hear both positive and negative. Before I went to nursing school, I worked as a nursing assistant in a local hospital which really helped me get patient care experience. I did corp. accounting for 5 years and raised a family for 10 years before deciding to make a career change as well. I am a new nurse, so I really do enjoy what I do. There is so much flexibility in the field as you mentioned. Nurses do make decisions even the docs are sometimes asking us what to do or for our opinion. This is just my opinion and my experience from where I work. Maybe try volunteering in a hospital or picking up a per diem job as a nursing assistant...ask around in your school. most schools have paid internships, but most don't offer till your last year of nursing. Good luck!

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Biffbradford specializes in ICU.

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I can't believe my eyes! I always thought that as an architect, the older you become and more experience you have, the more valuable you become. NOT the case in nursing - the older you are and the more experience you have, the greater expense you are to the hospital and more abt to be thrown under the bus and out the door.

There is certainly an autonomy and depending on where you work, an adrenaline rush. I suggest doing some volunteer work first, feel it out for yourself.

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3 Posts; 510 Profile Views

thank you for your comments! stcabr & Biffbradford - thank you for suggesting the volunteer work or a nursing assistant... very good ideas. You're right! the older you do get as an architect the more respect you're given and the more value you have. The problem is many times the further you go in the field the further you get away from designing. It becomes much more about project management - arguing with contractors/clients, etc. kungpoopanda I have volunteered for a emergency hotline as an advocate and it was very rewarding... I just am not sure I can find the same thing in architecture (although I am looking!) and am ready for a change. I think volunteering is the way to go. Thanks again everyone!

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2 Articles; 5,682 Posts; 50,646 Profile Views

Coming from a field where I had broad authority and autonomy, it took some adaptation to adjust to nursing's complete dearth of same.

Personally, I think "human connection" is a poor reason to go into nursing; many of us would love to have a lot less connection with many of the humans with whom our jobs require us to engage. Nurses deal with a lot of crap from a lot of people (in my experience, much more likely to be a patient or family than a doc) over things that are completely beyond our control or unreasonable expectations and demands from self-centered people.

There is variety, to be sure, but that can take quite a while to attain.

I've done quite a bit of project management and I think you may find that much of what you don't care for in that arena is found in nursing... and you're not going to see it by volunteering or working as a CNA.

My decision to go into nursing has proven to be a good one but that's been a matter of pragmatism and economics.

Be very cautious as you proceed.

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3 Posts; 510 Profile Views

thanks Silver 2 - i'm curious what was your prior career and the reason for your shift?... if you don't mind me asking :)

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2 Articles; 5,682 Posts; 50,646 Profile Views

I worked in various engineering roles for many years.

It was a complex set of motivations but the core reason for the change was economic instability and the desire for a job that wouldn't require relocating to chase after work.

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15 Posts; 1,716 Profile Views

I also have an architecture degree (worked for over three years now), but am starting a DNP-FNP program in the fall. A lot of people have a skewed perception of the architectural profession. Its not as glamorous as what the media shows, and the profession is evolving and making drastic changes...changes I do NOT want to be a part of. The only connection we have is with our computer screen 8+ hours a day, to name a few reasons why I want to get out. My cousin (an RN) initially told me to not even try, and now that I got accepted into the program she knows how serious I am about a career change and is more supportive.

Anyone in a similar situation since the last 2014 post in this thread?

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1 Post; 11 Profile Views

On 3/22/2016 at 1:59 PM, aab7 said:

I also have an architecture degree (worked for over three years now), but am starting a DNP-FNP program in the fall. A lot of people have a skewed perception of the architectural profession. Its not as glamorous as what the media shows, and the profession is evolving and making drastic changes...changes I do NOT want to be a part of. The only connection we have is with our computer screen 8+ hours a day, to name a few reasons why I want to get out. My cousin (an RN) initially told me to not even try, and now that I got accepted into the program she knows how serious I am about a career change and is more supportive.

Anyone in a similar situation since the last 2014 post in this thread?

Hi! I’m new to this blog. I felt the need to reply to this thread because I’m in the same path and a little beyond, let me explain: 

I have a bachelors in architecture in a foreign country, worked for 5 years as a full arch and after that, I moved into another bachelors in fine arts which I completed in the US. I became a jewelry designer stemming from art and actually my own jewelry design/manufacture business. So as you can see I’m fully immersed in the gratifying “art & design” world. However, I married a nurse, we started a life together and my income as an artist wasn’t as stable as I expected, and due the fact I don’t possess an US architect license I can’t practice beyond simple ACAD little jobs. 

I See how hard nurse jobs can be, and my husband advised me against nursing due it’s long preparation time and difficulty. Instead I decided to enroll as a phlebotomist, which is a lower entry level to the medical field. I have some experience in customer service which comes in handy when interacting briefly with patients. So far I’m loving it. I’m putting in practice my knowledge in anatomy from art school and I’m becoming better in medical jargon. Plus, you don’t get to touch too much the patients and your job scope is quite limited and it makes it easy to digest as a whole for someone who’s never been in the medical field.

My recommendation is: passions not always put food on the table. If you feel it’s within your human possibilities to change, do so, this life is one and we have the power to make the best out of it, in as many forms as we can and are willing to do! Never limit yourself!!! 

 

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Nurse SMS has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

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11 hours ago, Phleb-ex-arch said:

Hi! I’m new to this blog. I felt the need to reply to this thread because I’m in the same path and a little beyond, let me explain: 

I have a bachelors in architecture in a foreign country, worked for 5 years as a full arch and after that, I moved into another bachelors in fine arts which I completed in the US. I became a jewelry designer stemming from art and actually my own jewelry design/manufacture business. So as you can see I’m fully immersed in the gratifying “art & design” world. However, I married a nurse, we started a life together and my income as an artist wasn’t as stable as I expected, and due the fact I don’t possess an US architect license I can’t practice beyond simple ACAD little jobs. 

I See how hard nurse jobs can be, and my husband advised me against nursing due it’s long preparation time and difficulty. Instead I decided to enroll as a phlebotomist, which is a lower entry level to the medical field. I have some experience in customer service which comes in handy when interacting briefly with patients. So far I’m loving it. I’m putting in practice my knowledge in anatomy from art school and I’m becoming better in medical jargon. Plus, you don’t get to touch too much the patients and your job scope is quite limited and it makes it easy to digest as a whole for someone who’s never been in the medical field.

My recommendation is: passions not always put food on the table. If you feel it’s within your human possibilities to change, do so, this life is one and we have the power to make the best out of it, in as many forms as we can and are willing to do! Never limit yourself!!! 

 

Passion doesn't always put food on the table - brilliantly stated. Bottom line - the more essential a career path is and the fewer people who have the skill set to do it, the more jobs there will be and the more it will pay.

 

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