How does the expanded role of the NP affect AGACNPs

  1. Hello all,

    I am currently in my first year of a 2-year direct entry AGACNP program. It's going super well and I feel like the program is setting me up for success. I do have a couple of questions though. Mainly, I'm confused on how the expanded role of the NP affects those who work in critical care, or even more generally, within a hospital. I am completely aware that there will always be patients who are too complex for me and that a physician with more experience might be a better clinician for said patient, but is there any benefits to the legislation that more and more states are adopting that give NPs "more autonomy" and "the ability to practice without a supervising physician" with regards to those who work in a hospital? Would I see any real change from working in a really restrictive state, like South Carolina, and a really progressive state, like Washington?

    I asked the director of the AGACNP specialty during a sit down with the lot of us, and he talked about how some of the legislation is more geared towards having NPs governed by the State Board of Nursing, and not the State Medical Board as well. Is this all that the legislation is referring to? I know a lot of what NPs can do is dictated by the facility they work in, but I'm sure the same can be said, to a degree at least, about those working in primary care. I'm just trying to figure out if there is any benefit, or drawbacks, to working in a more progressive state.
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    About arockenhaus1

    Joined: Oct '17; Posts: 25; Likes: 17
    from TN , US

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  3. by   SURGICALNURSE2NPORMD
    There are some states that you can function independently without a physician agreement and those that require specific agreements and guidelines for those agreements.However, some states allow NPs to oversee more than others, effectively granting them much more autonomy. While some states grant NPs partial autonomy, others offer full practice authority (FPA), which enables them to practice without the oversight of a physician.

    23 States with NP Practice Autonomy
    Discover which 23 states have NP practice autonomy as of August 2017 and learn where nurse practitioners can find higher level working environments. Note that state regulations change frequently, and advance practice nurses should check with state nursing boards for the most current regulations.
  4. by   djmatte
    Quote from gnjoy
    There are some states that you can function independently without a physician agreement and those that require specific agreements and guidelines for those agreements.However, some states allow NPs to oversee more than others, effectively granting them much more autonomy. While some states grant NPs partial autonomy, others offer full practice authority (FPA), which enables them to practice without the oversight of a physician.

    23 States with NP Practice Autonomy
    Discover which 23 states have NP practice autonomy as of August 2017 and learn where nurse practitioners can find higher level working environments. Note that state regulations change frequently, and advance practice nurses should check with state nursing boards for the most current regulations.
    Also note that just because a state grants more autonomy doesn't mean insurance companies will grant the same. There are many noted instances where insurance companies still require a collaborator regardless of local policy.

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