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Student nurse almost graduate help?

Nurses   (590 Views | 8 Replies)
by Guest606 Guest606 (Member)

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Hey all!

so I’m about to graduate with my BSN here in the next couple of weeks or so. My dream job is the MICU, and I interviewed with one of the assistant nurse managers and shadowed the floor for an hour and felt confident that I landed the job. Shock and disbelief to me almost a week later when I get the rejection email. I asked HR for feedback and he said they wanted more examples for some of my answers.

i have the actual nurse manager’s business card and my question would be is it appropriate to contact her directly even though the ANM made the decision not to hire me? Thanks!!

Mirna

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Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,339 Posts; 130,019 Profile Views

It's likely that the manager was ultimately involved in the decision as well. Ask yourself:  what do you hope to accomplish by contacting the manager? 

If anything, you could thank them for their time and say that while you understand that you weren't selected this time, you hope they will keep you in mind for future opportunities. 

Best of luck in your search! 

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Rionoir is a ADN, RN and specializes in Neuro ICU.

600 Posts; 3,413 Profile Views

It sounds like you already got your answer - you were too vague in your answers to the interview questions.  Did you prepare answers for all of the most common interview questions, citing specific examples in each of your answers?  If not, I would search online for a list of the top 20-30 interview questions and type out answers for all of them, again being very specific in your answers.  Obviously you can't use the list when you interview (unless it's a phone interview, which should be crazy easy if you have prepared), but having done the preparation you should at least be able to think of the examples quickly the next time someone asks you those questions.  In my last interview my recruiter was giving me some feedback and commented that a lot of people aren't specific enough in their answers.  Fortunately, I had my word doc standing by (phone interview!) with my answers to almost all the questions she asked me so I wasn't struggling to think of situations to cite.

New grad ICU jobs are very competitive, so just because you might have gotten along with them at your interview doesn't mean you're going to get the job.  Someone else was apparently more prepared for the interview.

Edited by Rionoir

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24 minutes ago, Pixie.RN said:

It's likely that the manager was ultimately involved in the decision as well. Ask yourself:  what do you hope to accomplish by contacting the manager? 

If anything, you could thank them for their time and say that while you understand that you weren't selected this time, you hope they will keep you in mind for future opportunities. 

Best of luck in your search! 

Hey!! So the actual nurse manager wasn’t present during that time it was just with the ANM

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juan de la cruz has 27 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care.

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I can't tell you how many rejection letters I got as a new nurse, lol.  I think the decision to call is up to you.  You may get good feedback from doing so. On the other hand, chances are, your inexperience in nursing stacked poorly among other applicants who had some experience.  Even though the NM wasn't in the interview, this is likely collective decision between the NM and ANM.

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26 minutes ago, Rionoir said:

It sounds like you already got your answer - you were too vague in your answers to the interview questions.  Did you prepare answers for all of the most common interview questions, citing specific examples in each of your answers?  If not, I would search online for a list of the top 20-30 interview questions and type out answers for all of them, again being very specific in your answers.  Obviously you can't use the list when you interview (unless it's a phone interview, which should be crazy easy if you have prepared), but having done the preparation you should at least be able to think of the examples quickly the next time someone asks you those questions.  In my last interview my recruiter was giving me some feedback and commented that a lot of people aren't specific enough in their answers.  Fortunately, I had my word doc standing by (phone interview!) with my answers to almost all the questions she asked me so I wasn't struggling to think of situations to cite.

New grad ICU jobs are very competitive, so just because you might have gotten along with them at your interview doesn't mean you're going to get the job.  Someone else was apparently more prepared for the interview.

This was my very first interview searching for new grad jobs and I didn’t realize being too vague gets you cut. I did include some examples working as a tech but I guess it wasn’t enough. This was my dream job and I am disappointed in myself 😭

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19 Posts; 898 Profile Views

Being a new grad can be tough, but so rewarding when you get your first job, and you will! I've been going on interviews and have had job offers, so I'd like to help in any way I can. Everyone I talked to told me they are given these types of questions to ask now. They are called performance based interviewing questions. If you google it, you can get good examples. I asked everyone if they wanted specific examples or general experiences and they said they want specific experiences. 

I've been asked things like, "Tell me about a time you exceeded a customer's  expectations" "Tell me about a time you had a disagreement with a co-worker" "Tell me about a time when you were given multiple tasks to do and how did you handle it" " Tell me about a time you had a difficult customer and how did you handle it." "Tell me about a time you went above and beyond a customer's expectations." I've also had questions where they gave a scenario you walk into, and what do you do. Things like that.

I was a LPN for almost a decade, so I drew from those experiences. Of course, the ones I could tell they liked because they would smile a lot, nod their head and say, "Excellent!" was from things that happened as a LPN. Being a tech can also help. Was there a time when you advocated for a patient? Was there a time you had a conflict with a co-worker and were able to resolve it in a peaceful and adult like manner? Was there a situation that made you learn something from it to help you in the future? They want to see you can handle change, adapt, think on your feet, remain calm under pressure, are well spoken, personable (make them like you as a person), work well with others, and if given a scenario, think of general things you do, but also think of what the causes could be and what you would assess for and tell them all of it.

But I never applied to critical care. I've had offers for med-surg, tele and ER because I only applied to the ones I thought would hire new grads. Plus, I don't have my BSN yet. Some of the offers I received were from nurse residencies, so I'm not sure if critical care interviews are different.

And general things I do- smile a lot, be positive (one person told me she interviewed me because I looked "excited" and she felt like I clicked with her- I did get an offer), always send them a thank you email (just a few sentences thanking them) within 24 hours, arrive 10 minutes early, and ask questions at the interview that show an interest- meaning, don't just ask how much money it will be😀

Good luck and keep trying:)

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On 8/10/2019 at 11:31 AM, Pixie.RN said:

It's likely that the manager was ultimately involved in the decision as well. Ask yourself:  what do you hope to accomplish by contacting the manager? 

If anything, you could thank them for their time and say that while you understand that you weren't selected this time, you hope they will keep you in mind for future opportunities. 

Best of luck in your search! 

I just wanted to say THANK YOU. I emailed the actual manager thanking them for their time and keeping me in mind for future opportunities. She was really impressed and I have the actual interview with her next week. Much thanks again!!!!!!!!

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Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,339 Posts; 130,019 Profile Views

34 minutes ago, Citygirl606 said:

I just wanted to say THANK YOU. I emailed the actual manager thanking them for their time and keeping me in mind for future opportunities. She was really impressed and I have the actual interview with her next week. Much thanks again!!!!!!!!

AWESOME!!! Let us know how it goes. 🙂

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