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Starting first semester of nursing school

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by Happygirl1991 Happygirl1991 (New Member) New Member

Happygirl1991 has 1 years experience .

159 Visitors; 3 Posts

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Hi everyone, I'm starting my first quarter of nursing school in April and my school uses nclex style questions on nursing school exams. I'm really nervous about that since I have no idea how to answer those types of questions. I worked so hard to get to where I am and I really don't want to end up failing my first quarter. Any tips and advice on how to tackle nclex style questions? Thanks in advance.

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OsceanSN2018 works as a 4th Semester Nursing Student.

3,618 Visitors; 224 Posts

Your scared now, but I promise that you will learn to get use to the style just give it some time. I was nervous the same way you are, but now I simply cannot image taking a nursing exam without NCLEX style questions and not feeling prepared for them as well. I find doing as many practice questions as I can and then reading the rationales afterwards is very helpful. Also get the nlclex book by Saunders as a 2nd resource for your classes since it breaks down information so well.

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Cupcake2018 has 1 years experience.

4 Likes; 148 Visitors; 16 Posts

NCLEX-style questions can be a bit tricky. Some of the questions ask for multiple answers and other questions want you to pick the BEST answer. There are a variety of resources out there to help you prepare for these kinds of questions. I have used Lippincott's 'Question of the Day'. Just sign up and they will send a NCLEX question to your email on a daily basis for free. Comes with rationales as well.

Copy and paste this link: Free NCLEX-RN Practice Questions | Question of the Day

There are also several apps that you can purchase in the Apple, Google Play, or Android app stores. Lippincott and Kaplan are reputable makers of NCLEX-style questions.

Good luck!

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2,254 Visitors; 246 Posts

Your feelings are definitely common. It isn't too bad, I mean, it's still tough but you can figure it out in due time. NCLEX style questions are pretty application based I would say. So you just need to alter your reading style to digest the material and apply it to a real situation. Pretty much, knowing what is a priority and what can wait. Congrats on your acceptance. Don't worry about it right now though, they will teach you the stuff. If you want it as bad as it sounds then you will do great.

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meanmaryjean has 40 years experience and works as a Nursing Faculty.

48 Likes; 3 Followers; 63,682 Visitors; 7,496 Posts

I hate it when students and faculty refer to them as NCLEX-style questions.

They are questions. Period.

Many fields of inquiry and occupation require students to apply knowledge to real-life situations. There is no special name tying these questions to a particular licensing exam.

OP: Just learn the content and think through how it is useful to clinical situations.

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70 Likes; 5,440 Visitors; 393 Posts

Practice and critical thinking as you learn the subject contents is all you'll need.

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BassCatchingNurse has 10 years experience.

903 Visitors; 74 Posts

Many questions will be about prioritizing, delegation, pathophysiology, or drugs.

So...

If it is a prioritizing question (what would you do first?) Think A,B,Cs (airway, breathing, circulation)

If it is a delegation question then what can you delegate? Is it something that needs assessed..because you can't delegate that.

If it is a pathophysiology question...well you have to learn and then apply pathophysiology. Of course, the pathophysiology question might be embedded within a prioritizing question; therefore, study...learn...and apply. This will come to you.

If it is a drug question...same with patho...you need to study your meds, learn, and apply that knowledge. Do you need to check a BP prior to given med "x". Do you need to check a heart rate prior to given med. Does the patient need to be on a monitor for that med. What lab values do you need to follow if pt is on med "x." Again, these things will come to you as you study and learn.

Also, do not try to read too much into the question (this was a BIG problem with me...I always wanted...and STILL do...MORE information). Just read the question, try to see what they are really asking...is it about pathophysiology, delegation, prioritizing...and then apply your knowledge. Try not to over-think every question (like I did) and you will be fine.

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205 Likes; 2 Followers; 5,516 Visitors; 936 Posts

They are both trying to scare you, and prepare you for the eventual exam.

They should replace "NCLEX questions" with "basic nursing knowledge questions"

If you have already passed A and P, the NCLEX is easier than that.

So forget the propaganda, and you will be fine.

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nursechini has 1 years experience.

1 Like; 741 Visitors; 22 Posts

I think at this stage in your education thinking of questions as "NCLEX style" will psych you out and make you overthink the question. The questions on your test will be on materials that you learned in class. And what you learn in class is heavily scenario based. Meaning, you aren't just learning about drugs or diseases, you're learning about priorities and what you as the nurse are going to do for a patient on x medication or with y symptoms. Your critical thinking will develop and you'll get used to the new kinds of questions.

Also, I never used it but I had classmates who used the Saunders book throughout the program and they said it helped them. Good luck with nursing school!

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