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Start work and then quit..?

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by MikeyJ MikeyJ (New Member) New Member

MikeyJ specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

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Did anyone start a new job not too long before starting nursing school and then quit right away after you started? I started a new job (well, same organization I've been with for a while but took on a new position) a week after nursing school started. The work load for school is becoming increasingly more and more (the material and concepts don't seem difficult, but the amount of material expected to memorize.. especially in patho/pharm... is tremendous).

I think I may walk into work on Monday and explain my situation and apologize for taking a new position and quitting right away... but I think it has to be done if I want to do well in my patho/pharm class. I am terrifed to do so because I know my manager will be peeved at me -- especially considering I am trained for my position and they will have to look for someone new to replace me. Eeek... what to do... :uhoh3:

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WDWpixieRN specializes in Med/Surg <1; Epic Certified <1.

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Did anyone start a new job not too long before starting nursing school and then quit right away after you started? I started a new job (well, same organization I've been with for a while but took on a new position) a week after nursing school started.

Well, I got you beat on this one....I had worked full-time in IT for 6 years for my previous employer....I had cold feet about completely cutting the ties and was worried about $$$....the IT division couldn't keep me part-time, but I found something in a totally different division...I took a week off between my IT position and the start of the new job and school....on Monday I had my first class and realized that , this was NOT going to work out!! I went down for the first day of training after class, then wasn't scheduled to work until Th....on W I called and let them know that there was no way I could do it....NS was much more involved that I anticipated just based on my class schedule alone!! I don't think they were thrilled, but seemed to understand. And my former manager and peers all seemed to understand. (He recently gave me a glowing reference for an internship!!)

You do what you have to in order to get through a NS program. They might not understand, but the truth of the matter is, neither did you before you actually started NS. As long as you can live with your decision, whatever they think of it is secondary. Just be sure not to burn any bridges behind you....but then if you planned on doing that, you wouldn't have written here about it bothering you!! :icon_hug:

Best wishes!!

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Daytonite has 40 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt.

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In case you forgot, this is America and you can pretty much do anything you want (as long as it's legal, that is). About the only problem I see you having is that if you quit on the spot, it may get reported on future references that you did not give the required notice of termination. You can nip that in the bud by giving a letter of resignation in which you specifically direct this firm to only release information for any future references on you about your dates of employment, the job position you held and that you terminated voluntarily, period. If you can work the required length to terminate that would probably be helpful. In any case, I would just be upfront and honest with the boss that you had no idea how burdensome schoolwork was going to be, but that it has to be your first priority-sorry. I was a boss. Bosses have this happen from time to time. They can deal with it. It comes with their job. When you finish nursing school, you have to have references from your nursing instructors to get your first nursing job anyway. As the years go on, references from past jobs aren't even considered anymore because they are just too far in the past.

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MrChicagoRN has 30 years experience and specializes in Leadership, Psych, HomeCare, Amb. Care.

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Needing to quit because you are over-stressed is legitimate.

But instead of walking in to resign, why not talk it out.

Maybe you can switch to PT for awhile, or go PT till they find a replacement.

Or they might let you take some time off when you need the study time.

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I had was in this same position a month ago! I had just gotten a new job. I didn't plan on getting in nursing school until Jan. & a spot came open for the fall. Well of course I took it. I felt really really bad at first for leaving but when I talked to my boss she was fine with it. Her words were "Your education is more important than this job and your studies always come first." That sealed the deal for me and the guilt was gone. I Hope this helped!

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nursing twin is a CNA and specializes in OR Nursing Internship.

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I think the great solution is to be a per diem CNA. I have done this my whole way through nursing school and I call up my supervisor and pick up hours when I want to. If I have a test I may not pick up until after I've taken it. I take out student loans to cover other added expenses. I have gotten used to budgeting and living like a student.

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