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St. Vincent's Is The Lehman Brothers of NY Hospitals

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Interesting article featured in this week's issue of New York Magazine. It lays out the details of why St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Center of NY closed, and the cold (often brutal) hard facts regarding what it costs to run a hospital in New York.

Article also goes into the shakey financial status of most NYC hospitals, and why St. Vincent's (along with North General and about ten others) closings may not be the last for the area.

http://nymag.com/news/features/68991/

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Very detailed & well-rounded article. Thanks for sharing.

Incredible article. And one that makes me question alot of things.

JeanettePNP, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy. Has 8 years experience.

This article goes a long way to explain why the job outlook for new grads in NYC is so terrible...

This article goes a long way to explain why the job outlook for new grads in NYC is so terrible...

I agree! very informative

Ever since St. Vinny's announced their closure, have been posting about the sad and sorry state of most NYC hospitals. This article brought it all home.

Am here to tell you, any business that only recoups on average 70 cents on each dollar spent, won't be around for long, at least without major changes.

Regarding new or future grads, and even those considering going into the profession, it is going to be *very* interesting as this all plays out. It may mean rather than being a "Mount Sinai" nurse, one should think of oneself as a nurse employed by Mount Sinai, and that can and probably will change over the course of one's career.

What scares me is that hospitals and nursing homes will continue to push the envelope to keep down associated costs in regards to nursing care. Patient ratios, expanded use of UAPs and techs, and whatever else the powers that be can think of are probably going to be on the table. As the article pointed out, growth will probably not be in hospitals,but ambulatory,out-patient services including home care. Since many of those positions usually require a nurse to have experience, new grads may find themselves with still limited chances.

Methinks for new grads things may not get better anytime soon in the NYC area. This place is not exactly a cheap place to live, and many experienced nurses have seen their worlds turned upside down the past year or so. They are probably going to have to work much longer, regardless of how they may feel about it to restock the kitty. This is provided they have (or can) find work. IIRC, there are still nurses from all the Catholic hospitals (St. John's and Mary Immaculate in Queens, and most recently St. Vinny's) that haven't found full time work.

Also inflation is all but certain to return, when that happens many under or out of work nurses may find themselves futher behind economically.

Despite all that has happened, the NYS health dept still says NYC has too many hospital beds, and many are too close to each other. If North Shore-LIJ hadn't stepped in, Long Island Hospital probably would have closed. Local hospital to the affluent Upper EastSide of Manhattan as well as the rich and famous it may be, but you've got Mount Sinai just 30 blocks north, and NYP several avenues east and about ten blocks south. After all if the residents of The Village and Far Westside are being asked to go clear across Manhattan to Bellevue or Beth Israel, the same should apply for all.

CrufflerJJ, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 5 years experience.

Excellent article. The pictures of mothballed units are very sad.

bijou

Specializes in Medical-Surgical.

Interesting article featured in this week's issue of New York Magazine. It lays out the details of why St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Center of NY closed, and the cold (often brutal) hard facts regarding what it costs to run a hospital in New York.

Article also goes into the shakey financial status of most NYC hospitals, and why St. Vincent's (along with North General and about ten others) closings may not be the last for the area.

http://nymag.com/news/features/68991/

Wow, what an eye opener...

Despite all that has happened, the NYS health dept still says NYC has too many hospital beds, and many are too close to each other. If North Shore-LIJ hadn't stepped in, Long Island Hospital probably would have closed. Local hospital to the affluent Upper EastSide of Manhattan as well as the rich and famous it may be, but you've got Mount Sinai just 30 blocks north, and NYP several avenues east and about ten blocks south. After all if the residents of The Village and Far Westside are being asked to go clear across Manhattan to Bellevue or Beth Israel, the same should apply for all.

Above "Long Island Hospital" should be Lenox Hill, as they were purchased by North Shore-LIJ . Sorry for the incorrect information. Really need to read carefully before posting!:D