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Simple Solutions to Everyday Problems

Med-Surg   (918 Views 7 Comments)
by ezckimo ezckimo (New Member) New Member

842 Visitors; 8 Posts

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I'm a looking for simple, effective, and smart solutions. Pearls of wisdom. I'm a relatively new nurse; home health and then oncology experience, now I'm working Med-Surg. Yep, backwards for some but I'm living my life and I love it! Anyway, at work I was thinking about "little things" that make life easier for nurses, especially when they improve patient care or time management. For example, keeping mini-scissors in your pocket (the hospital I work now keeps them in the room, but of course one room didn't have any); or making a sling out of a pillowcase to elevate yeasty, enlarged scrotums (yes you read that, you're a nurse, get over it); or those nylon tube-things to be able to boost people by yourself. Those are my examples, I would love to hear some of your pearls of wisdom!

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greenerpastures has 5 years experience.

5,724 Visitors; 190 Posts

Work on your McGyver skills!  A piece of cut oxygen tubing makes a great bypass for a split PEG tube that can't be replaced right away. Lopez valves are your friends on ALL NG and PEG tubes if your policy allows. 

Try to get all your charting done by 12.  That way you aren't behind the 8 ball if anything goes wrong. 

The patient that says "I"m fine, I walked yesterday" definitely needs a gait belt and a 2 person assist the first time.  

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ClaraRedheart has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

7,249 Visitors; 253 Posts

I have a pen on a badge reel attached to a key ring and carabiner that I wear on my right waistband. Perfect for labeling IV tubing or signing a document without searching for a pen. On the same carabiner, I also keep scissors (on a reel, but detachable) tape on a keyring, a penlight and an inexpensive pulse ox. It's much better than keeping all of that stuff in your pockets and fumbling around. Also easy to detach each and saniwipe. I'm Nurse Gadget 🙂

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CalicoKitty has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-surg.

1 Follower; 15,528 Visitors; 627 Posts

I have one of those fancy clipboards and a tether for my pen on it. (I refill the ink when needed!). When I start my shift, I print out a sheet with all my patient info, on our Cerner, it is the "clinical snapshot". I write my report notes on it.

Square bordered foam dressings can be cut and put over heels. The heel/ankle bits can flip. 

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Some dementia patients can be kept "busy" by giving them a few towels to fold.

I honestly find it easier to just do something rather than try to find someone else to do it (water, changing wet chux on a patient that can help turn). I delegate when I am busy, but, often it helps with ASSessments, and helps reposition the patient.

If I draw blood into a syringe, I usually pop the lids off of the vacutainers and squirt in rather than fumble with the needle. (I prefer drawing into a 3ml syringe rather than use the connectors into the tubes since those seem to hemolyze more often).

Tape an upside down medicine cup to the wow, and stack others on it - they are harder to knock over.

I've also blown up gloves to help elevate the 'boys', with a moisture barrier like a towel or pillowcase.

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2,496 Visitors; 330 Posts

On 4/8/2019 at 7:03 PM, ClaraRedheart said:

I have a pen on a badge reel attached to a key ring and carabiner that I wear on my right waistband. Perfect for labeling IV tubing or signing a document without searching for a pen. On the same carabiner, I also keep scissors (on a reel, but detachable) tape on a keyring, a penlight and an inexpensive pulse ox. It's much better than keeping all of that stuff in your pockets and fumbling around. Also easy to detach each and saniwipe. I'm Nurse Gadget 🙂

I'd love to see a pic of this! 

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wildrosesRN has 2 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med/Surg.

42 Visitors; 3 Posts

Reverse trendelenburg is your friend when it comes to boosting patients. Sometimes the patient is completely able to boost themselves when working with gravity. Protecting your back and shoulders is key, plus it saves you time from finding another nurse.

Nurse fanny pack is my life. I love being able to carry pens, pencils, highlighters, scissors and rolls of tape.

Keeping a list of common IV drip rates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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9 Followers; 23,252 Visitors; 3,102 Posts

^ Trendelenburg. (Reverse trendelenburg is tilted with head up/feet down)

And you should still get adequate help according to the pt's weight and the task at hand.

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