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Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Nurses   (1,537 Views 11 Comments)
by BSN_after_40 BSN_after_40 (Member)

BSN_after_40 has 19 years experience and specializes in Public Health, Teaching, Geriatric, M/S.

7 Articles; 2,604 Visitors; 35 Posts

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I have been trying to make a decision for over a year now and I thought I would post this to other nurses that may have been in my shoes. I have been working for almost 3 years in a Public Health setting, or a desk job which is very quiet and easy going. My clients are over 65 and I case manage thier Elderly Waiver Programs. I like my job, The hours are great (no weekends, holidays, or evenings), and I love my boss to death, she is great! The problem is that I feel so unchallenged and held back. I worked in LTC for the first 2 1/2 years after I got my RN and then this job fell into my lap half way through my schooling to become a BSN.

Another thing I like about my job is that it is very flexible and has allowed me to teach part time as well. What I really want is the hospital experience. I am looking into going for my master's degree in the next few years and let's face it, I am getting rusty sitting behind a desk! I know I need the acute care experience.

So any advice out there? I worked as an LPN in a hospital for many years and maybe I miss that challenge. Going part time is not a good option because the insurance is outrageous and they only want a full time employee. Help!!!

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19,744 Visitors; 2,227 Posts

Working in a hospital is difficult and gets more so each day.

There are people that would give their eyeteeth for your job.

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2,327 Visitors; 41 Posts

Ahhh, the Human Condition. It seems that we always want something we don't have!

You mentioned that you teach part time...are there any facilities nearby that would bring you aboard on a casual / part-time basis?

It seems like I notice more and more advertisements for Nursing staff with a FTE

If you "blow off" the teaching and work our full shift per week at the facility of your choice, that gives you the best of BOTH worlds, No?

The Down Side:

You only get one day off per week, unless you piggy-back your part-time "real" Nurse gig on the same day. THAT puts you in a minimum sleep situation, and as a person who worked 80-hour week for YEARS, you'll pay a price.

The Up Side:

You get to keep the cool gig, and the great boss (which are big time blessings in themselves). You'll make more money but have less time to spend it on nonsense. And we haven't discussed the intellectual / spiritual benefits.

Good Luck whatever you choose.

DLG

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KateRN1 has 20 years experience and specializes in COS-C, Risk Management.

13,963 Visitors; 1,191 Posts

Would you be able to work agency/registry shifts? They're not as abundant as they used to be, but might be worth a look-see. Also check out private duty shifts with companies like Maxim and PSA. One PD shift a week with them won't kill you. (I think.)

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NC Girl BSN specializes in Psych, LTC, Acute Care.

13,113 Visitors; 1,845 Posts

STAY. I would keep your day job and work PRN on the some weekends at the hospital. I have been working in the hopsital for almost 3 months and the work load is hard. I know for a fact that I will not do bedside nursing for long. I just signed up for statistics in the fall to get my BSN so I can get a job similar to what you describe. Good luck to you but IMO your job sounds way better and your boss sounds like a winner. I am doing my time in the acute care setting then I am saying adios!

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BSN_after_40 has 19 years experience and specializes in Public Health, Teaching, Geriatric, M/S.

7 Articles; 2,604 Visitors; 35 Posts

I hope I don't come off sounding ungrateful for my present job, because I did my time in the trenches of double shifts, holidays, night shifts, short staffing, all that. I remember VERY vividly those days. I worked very hard to get to where I am today. I guess some of us are just not cut out to sit behind a desk 40 hours a week. I have been doing this for almost 3 years now thinking I would adjust. I apppreciate all your comments and input. :D

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Moogie specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

1 Article; 22,238 Visitors; 1,796 Posts

I hope I don't come off sounding ungrateful for my present job, because I did my time in the trenches of double shifts, holidays, night shifts, short staffing, all that. I remember VERY vividly those days. I worked very hard to get to where I am today. I guess some of us are just not cut out to sit behind a desk 40 hours a week. I have been doing this for almost 3 years now thinking I would adjust. I apppreciate all your comments and input. :D

I think you need to follow your passion, regardless of what anyone else thinks or would do in your situation. Some people are better at the bedside than behind the desk---that doesn't mean there's anything wrong with you or that you're ungrateful for your experiences. If you've done your current job for three years and no longer feel challenged---or that you still haven't adjusted----listen to your heart.

Moreover, you said you're interested in pursuing your master's. May I ask what your eventual goals are? If you're thinking of teaching, yes, current bedside experience will be helpful. If you're thinking of other advanced practice such as CNS or NP, current clinical experience will be imperative. And if you aren't sure which route you want---maybe look into a hospital that has a clinical ladder, one that will acknowledge and reward you for your past experience and education while helping you gain more experience---and a degree---that will get you where you want to be in your career.

Wishing you all the best as you make this decision!

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2,263 Visitors; 19 Posts

Pick up per diem shifts at the hospital..With your experience as an lpn in acute care I am sure you will secure a position...If anything you will be able to see if "bedside" nursing is what you want!...After attaining my RN in my early 30's I know that I will not be able to be a bedside nurse forever...Per diem will give you that "clinical" challenge all good nurses crave to have!..Best of luck to you.

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3 Followers; 95,904 Visitors; 36,540 Posts

Working in a hospital is difficult and gets more so each day.

There are people that would give their eyeteeth for your job.

I haven't worked in months and think having a job where you go, do something, and then get paid for it, is all the challenge I need. You can take the job in a hospital if you want to but please give me your present job with all of its lack of challenges. :o

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BSN_after_40 has 19 years experience and specializes in Public Health, Teaching, Geriatric, M/S.

7 Articles; 2,604 Visitors; 35 Posts

caliotter3,

I'm sure that there are many nurses in the same situation you are in. The hospital I used to work at permanently laid off almost all of it's senior staff to cut costs and then turned around and hired all new grads, at significantly less pay at part time status, but scheduled full time as a skeleton crew. As with most health care facilities today, they look at the money, not the care. I hate how I feel about this job, it is the job I always wanted. It works so well with my family time. I think I will check into the per deim idea, and put the teaching aside for a year. Thanks to all that have posted.

Caliotter3, hang in there, I hope you find a great job. As the baby boomers continue to age, nurses will continue to be in demand. Take care.

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3 Followers; 95,904 Visitors; 36,540 Posts

My concern for you is that if it gets so bad for you that you decide to leave your job, you might find yourself in a similar position. A lot of nurses are putting up with less than desirable situations because they don't want to enter the ranks of those who can't find work. Good luck with finding a way to come to a happy medium.

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