Supposed Illness

  1. Need your reply.....
    Do you ever send a child home sick solely on the say of the teacher ?
    I have a teacher who tells me tales of her students who are so sick and need to go home and I for the life of me do not see a sick child ?
    How do you handle this ? I am having a real problem with this at this time.
    Thank you all very much !
  2. Visit Keepstanding profile page

    About Keepstanding, ADN

    Joined: Jan '05; Posts: 1,679; Likes: 1,653

    6 Comments

  3. by   Jeanine
    Sometimes I do. I often find that a teacher knows the student better than I do, so I will give them the initial benefit of the doubt.
    If this is a frequent problem, I ask a staff member to watch my sick students for a few minutes (or close the door if I have none at the time) while I walk the "sick" child back to the classroom and interrupt the teacher for their "valuable, medical opinion". Hopefully, they will get the hint. I always invite them to see me for a friendly discussion at the end of the day, but if you don't let the teacher know how you feel, then they won't know, will they?
    If you don't get anywhere with that, ask for a meeting with that teacher and the principal. You can explain that your job is to keep these kids healthy and in school. So... unless they have a fever, rash, are bleeding profusely, or are vomiting, you would like them to return to the classroom to get the most of the valuable education that this talented teacher is providing for them.
  4. by   Keepstanding
    Quote from Jeanine
    Sometimes I do. I often find that a teacher knows the student better than I do, so I will give them the initial benefit of the doubt.
    If this is a frequent problem, I ask a staff member to watch my sick students for a few minutes (or close the door if I have none at the time) while I walk the "sick" child back to the classroom and interrupt the teacher for their "valuable, medical opinion". Hopefully, they will get the hint. I always invite them to see me for a friendly discussion at the end of the day, but if you don't let the teacher know how you feel, then they won't know, will they?
    If you don't get anywhere with that, ask for a meeting with that teacher and the principal. You can explain that your job is to keep these kids healthy and in school. So... unless they have a fever, rash, are bleeding profusely, or are vomiting, you would like them to return to the classroom to get the most of the valuable education that this talented teacher is providing for them.
    Thanks and well said !!
  5. by   miss_anneRN
    Hi Praiser,
    ( i think I deleted my first post before it posted! hopefully you don't get this twice!)
    I am not a school nurse. I precepted with one for my peds rotation (I was shocked how many kids flow in & out in one hour!!!) I do have 2 boys that have been to the nurse's office plenty!!! i hope these suggestions will be handy.
    Refer to the school's policies. They must state what definate s/s will send a child home. If policies are not available, you could probabaly find professional organizations dedicated to school nursing on line that outline standards of care. As the school nurse you are responsible for educationg the staff as well. Email all teachers (so as not to single out!) the most updated policy or standards. Also, network with other nurses in that school system or state.
    Assess the child, document findings, act accordingly. If the assessment does not render a ticket home, send the child back to class. Explain to the teacher the the child's (lack of) s/s do not meet criteria set by the policy or standards of care to send him home. Maybe a phone call home to the parents for a head's up that the child was in your office might get you some clues. For instance maybe mom will say he's been eating less lately or just as active as ever. Get the parents involved. That way it becomes parents -vs- teacher, not coworker -vs- coworker. Your job is to assess... not diagnose (I had this made quite clear to me in my rotation).
    Unfortunatly you two just may butt heads on this forever. Taking your concerns to the principal may also be helpful if this becomes persistent. Stick to your guns, after all you are there for the kids. Keeping them in school is the main goal. Be armed with policies and documentation that you practiced within those policies and you should be fine. Also, brush up on communication skills...it sounds like this may take alot of time to resolve.
    Keep up the hard work, schools can't function without you!!!
  6. by   justme1972
    I would find out if her "sick" children are also her "problem" children
  7. by   michigooseBSN
    This is not a frequent problem but it does happen occasionally. I figure if a teacher has sent a child to me several times and I can't determine an illness(fever etc) the teacher probably knows this child better than I do. I call the room and speak with the teacher and say "as far as I can see, the child isn't sick enough to need to go home but if the teacher thinks the parent ought to be called, I will do so" If this happens (not very often) I tell the parent exactly that. "According to my judgement, the kid can stay but the teacher feels he/she ought to go home" Afterall, this kid probably isn't accomplishing much in the classroom and may be distracting everyone else.
    This seems to work to everybodies advantage. The teacher often agrees to let the kid stay and if not, the teacher knows I will work with, not against, her.
  8. by   TXNurseBSN
    I don't send anyone home unless they meet the criteria set forth by my school district. I am in a middle school and find that some teachers will send kids to me because they don't know what to else to do with them.

    I have found that as a school nurse, I have to set some boundaries in place or the teachers will run my clinic and not me!

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