Some things never change - page 2

We've all been there... This happened today: Parent: can my child use their expired inhaler and epi pen from last year? Me: I need unexpired medications and new MD orders along with an... Read More

  1. by   FloridaBeagle
    Yup, I'm dealing with this now. It's usually, "Oh, those forms the school sent at the end of last year? I returned them!" ...only when they look at the stack of stuff in their hands do they realize they have said form right there, not filled out.

    You would think the doctors would be more pro-active on this issue because I'm calling them and they're telling me how slammed they are. They could schedule summer appointments for all the high-risk anaphylaxis kids and asthma kids. Then the secretary could easily fax us the updated plans/orders. This ain't rocket science.
  2. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Honestly, I MAY have dosed out of an expired inhaler or two while waiting for new ones. The whole expiration date thing is interesting. A pharmacy will label a one year date from the day of dispensing regardless of the manufacturer's date. There are actually a couple of articles about the efficacy of expired inhalers and Epi-pens. (Yes, those are late coming in to...)
    The FDA recently admitted that medications have a longer shelf life than what the label says. No surprises there.

    The expiration date on a dispensed med signifies the expiration date of the Rx, not the med. (I worked as a pharmacy tech in the past.)
  3. by   NutmeggeRN
    But the bottom line on expiration dates is that we CANNOT accept them...how is there any way to defend this in court?


    Lawyer " So you KNEW the date was expired yet you gave it to Susie Q..."
    Me " But, I KNOW (cause my pharmacist said so) that is was still good"
    Lawyer "But, it didn't work and Susie Q was admitted to hospital and the bill is 8 gazillion dollars and YOU are responsible for it"
    Me, breaking down and crying and wondering why the parents are not held responsible for giving me this expired inhaler...


    ^^^^My worst nightmare!!!!^^^^
  4. by   Cattz
    Exhibit # 5,612, why we "old, burnt out (school) nurses " just gotta do what we gotta do!! C'MON NOW!!!
  5. by   iggywench
    I have a student who was dx with asthma over the summer. Mom sent in an Asthma Action Plan, and when I called to ask her if she was planning to come and check in an inhaler, she informed me that she was planning to send it to school with the student the next day. When I told her that wasn't an option, that parents have to check in medications, she said that she was going to sue the school if her daughter had an asthma attack, and hung up. This was two weeks ago; my AP has made numerous attempts to reach this mom via phone, but she won't return the call. Why is it so hard to understand that students are not allowed to transport medication to and from school? Her daughter has been in our district for at least three years...
  6. by   djh123
    Quote from applewhitern
    Well I sure as heck wouldn't want to need it and find it was full, but without propellant.
    I didn't, nor did the pharmacist, say 'without propellant'. Whatever he said, his tone of voice was clearly 'They still work fine for several years'.
  7. by   djh123
    Quote from iggywench
    I have a student who was dx with asthma over the summer. Mom sent in an Asthma Action Plan, and when I called to ask her if she was planning to come and check in an inhaler, she informed me that she was planning to send it to school with the student the next day. When I told her that wasn't an option, that parents have to check in medications, she said that she was going to sue the school if her daughter had an asthma attack, and hung up. This was two weeks ago; my AP has made numerous attempts to reach this mom via phone, but she won't return the call. Why is it so hard to understand that students are not allowed to transport medication to and from school? Her daughter has been in our district for at least three years...
    She's not willing to do her part, but she's going to sue the school because it's ... somehow... your fault, right? I love the not-logic.
  8. by   tining
    Document, document, documnt
  9. by   SnugglePuggle
    Quote from iggywench
    I have a student who was dx with asthma over the summer. Mom sent in an Asthma Action Plan, and when I called to ask her if she was planning to come and check in an inhaler, she informed me that she was planning to send it to school with the student the next day. When I told her that wasn't an option, that parents have to check in medications, she said that she was going to sue the school if her daughter had an asthma attack, and hung up. This was two weeks ago; my AP has made numerous attempts to reach this mom via phone, but she won't return the call. Why is it so hard to understand that students are not allowed to transport medication to and from school? Her daughter has been in our district for at least three years...
    Ohio gives me a little leeway....Students are permitted to self-carry inhalers and EpiPens as long as their physician deems them responsible enough to do so!
  10. by   bsyrn
    Quote from SnugglePuggle
    Ohio gives me a little leeway....Students are permitted to self-carry inhalers and EpiPens as long as their physician deems them responsible enough to do so!
    New York also thank goodness!!!

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