Retired Registered School Nurse ... hero

  1. Retired School Nurse, Peggy Phillips, performed CPR and tried to save the life of a woman (who later died) on a Southwest Boeing 737 flight from New York to Dallas.

    Officials said the left engine blew on Flight 1380 roughly 20 minutes after it left LaGuardia Airport on Tuesday en route for Dallas.
    Nurse recalls effort to save killed Southwest passenger - NY Daily News

    Central Texas man tried to save woman sucked out jet's shattered window (this link misprints Ms. Phillips first name)
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    About sirI, MSN, APRN, NP Admin

    Joined: Jun '05; Posts: 108,225; Likes: 28,032
    MedLeg Consul/Educator/WHNP-FNP; from US
    Specialty: 35 year(s) of experience in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB

    12 Comments

  3. by   Farawyn
    Heartbreaking.
  4. by   Avill
    Tragic story of course, but I didn't know she was a school nurse. I fly often and wonder what I would do in case of emergency on an airplane since I don't have certain skills other nurses have.
  5. by   NutmeggeRN
    Ugh...what an awful thing, it must have been terrible to experience. I shall pay more attention to the precheck instructions...
  6. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from Avill
    Tragic story of course, but I didn't know she was a school nurse. I fly often and wonder what I would do in case of emergency on an airplane since I don't have certain skills other nurses have.
    You would do whatever you could, I'm sure. I understand that you can't hear to take a BP but you could probably do it by palp....But I bet if you had to do CPR on someone you wouldn't hesitate.

    And Nutmegg-yes, I thought that too!! Pay attention to the flight safety show!
  7. by   OldDude
    So the reports are she and another guy performed CPR on the poor victim for 20 minutes. If you've done chest compressions in reality, you know it doesn't take very long for the sweat to start dripping off the end of your nose and you arms become like rubber bands and you are whipped in general - even switching off with someone else. Imagine doing that in the narrow aisle of an airplane!! This woman must be made of titanium!!
  8. by   Farawyn
    Quote from OldDude
    So the reports are she and another guy performed CPR on the poor victim for 20 minutes. If you've done chest compressions in reality, you know it doesn't take very long for the sweat to start dripping off the end of your nose and you arms become like rubber bands and you are whipped in general - even switching off with someone else. Imagine doing that in the narrow aisle of an airplane!! This woman must be made of titanium!!
    Adrenaline.

    I can't even imagine this scene. My brain keeps saying NO.
  9. by   OldDude
    Quote from Farawyn
    Adrenaline.

    I can't even imagine this scene. My brain keeps saying NO.
    You'd jump in with both feet just the same...
  10. by   Farawyn
    Quote from OldDude
    You'd jump in with both feet just the same...
    Of course!!! We all would.

    The aftermath, however.
  11. by   LikeTheDeadSea
    I was on a Southwest recently. Holy Moley. I know driving a car is more dangerous than a plane ride, but this was definitely a "life is precious and on loan" reminder!
  12. by   kbrn2002
    As I've been working the past few days and basically living under the proverbial rock I hadn't heard that part of the story yet. That's pretty incredible, good for those two for stepping up and helping. It's too bad that their efforts were not successful. From what I've been hearing from different news sources the odds for survival were definitely not in the victims favor after that kind of catastrophic injury.

    While it's not at all nursing related, another hero here is definitely the pilot. While I of course have zero experience in flying any kind of plane I can't imagine bringing down a severely damaged commercial airliner with minimal loss of life is an easy thing. If not for that pilots skill there could have been a much worse outcome for many more people.
  13. by   OldDude
    Quote from kbrn2002
    As I've been working the past few days and basically living under the proverbial rock I hadn't heard that part of the story yet. That's pretty incredible, good for those two for stepping up and helping. It's too bad that their efforts were not successful. From what I've been hearing from different news sources the odds for survival were definitely not in the victims favor after that kind of catastrophic injury.

    While it's not at all nursing related, another hero here is definitely the pilot. While I of course have zero experience in flying any kind of plane I can't imagine bringing down a severely damaged commercial airliner with minimal loss of life is an easy thing. If not for that pilots skill there could have been a much worse outcome for many more people.
    No doubt! If you listen to the cockpit recordings of her communication with the airport you'd think she was having a casual chat over the fence with the neighbor. Her blood had to have turned to ice water during that event!! Amazing pilot...amazing guardian over her crew and passengers.
  14. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from Avill
    Tragic story of course, but I didn't know she was a school nurse. I fly often and wonder what I would do in case of emergency on an airplane since I don't have certain skills other nurses have.
    I think our skill might be of more use because we are nurses that don't have access to most hospital equipment and have to think on our feet - which is basically what one can do on an airplane.

    I was on a plane once when they asked if there were any medical professionals on board. I was the only one and checked in with a passenger. A minor issue, thankfully! But they still needed my license number after the encounter, something I didn't even think about.

    This woman and the other man that helped are heroes in my book, even with the tragic results. And hats off to the crew. I can't even imagine...
    Last edit by JenTheSchoolRN on Apr 23

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