Did CPR for the first time today. - page 4

Student passed out on PE doing fitness gram, was having abnormal breathing and not responding. Called 911, operator gave instructions to do CPR and just did it, 3 mins, not stopping. Other people... Read More

  1. by   XingtheBBB
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    Not to be mean, but I see a lot of redundant responses, the answer is in the thread.
    I'm going to add another dynamic to this. I taught PALS before leaving the ICUs for school and compressions are indicated if there is no pulse OR if there is a pulse that is not effective. So if there was a pulse less than 60 and the child had symptoms of poor perfusion (the unresponsiveness), there should be compressions. We haven't been told what this child's palpable carotid pulse was or how it was obtained. I thought there was a post that mentioned hearing a pulse- remember a person can have an apical pulse without a palpable central pulse.

    I've given compressions in the presence of an ineffective pulse and only once have I had the person perfuse enough to hit me while compressing and then go back to unresponsive thready bradycardia when I'd take my hands off.
  2. by   TakuRN
    Awesome work!
  3. by   Amethya
    Quote from XingtheBBB
    I'm going to add another dynamic to this. I taught PALS before leaving the ICUs for school and compressions are indicated if there is no pulse OR if there is a pulse that is not effective. So if there was a pulse less than 60 and the child had symptoms of poor perfusion (the unresponsiveness), there should be compressions. We haven't been told what this child's palpable carotid pulse was or how it was obtained. I thought there was a post that mentioned hearing a pulse- remember a person can have an apical pulse without a palpable central pulse.

    I've given compressions in the presence of an ineffective pulse and only once have I had the person perfuse enough to hit me while compressing and then go back to unresponsive thready bradycardia when I'd take my hands off.
    Thank you for the information! That's something interesting to read, and keep in mind.
  4. by   icepak
    Quote from cid1
    I am confused. Did student have a pulse?? Was she transported??
    I wondered about that too...
  5. by   lifelearningrn
    Quote from Amethya
    We do, but I didn't use it unless the 911 operator said to use it. As it was said, I am only a CMA, I am CPR/AED certified but the thing that we were so panicked and worried, that all that training just went out of the window and I called 911 to make sure what procedures should be taken.
    I understand, you did exactly what you were supposed to given the circumstances. Scary! I'm glad you were able to keep a clear head and that your student is doing good. Have they ruled out seizures?
  6. by   inthecosmos
    Did you debrief? Feel okay about the situation? You did great!
  7. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from inthecosmos
    Did you debrief? Feel okay about the situation? You did great!
    I am sure she has changed since then.
  8. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Quote from Amethya
    She did but the 911 operator said to do it because she had labored/abnormal breathing. She wasn't transported because she was fine after a while and mother came to pick her up.
    Um, if the patient had a perfusing rhythm, you shouldn't have been doing compressions.

    If the kid was so stable that EMS didn't see the need for transport, even more so.

    And effective CPR is traumatic.

    I'm truly stunned that you did CPR on a patient for three minutes and that didn't even buy the kid a basic ED work up.
  9. by   MrNurse(x2)
    Quote from ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Um, if the patient had a perfusing rhythm, you shouldn't have been doing compressions.

    If the kid was so stable that EMS didn't see the need for transport, even more so.

    And effective CPR is traumatic.

    I'm truly stunned that you did CPR on a patient for three minutes and that didn't even buy the kid a basic ED work up.
    Please read the thread before criticizing. This is ALL discussed. It WAS appropriate and warranted through 911 and OP level of education.
  10. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Quote from MrNurse(x2)
    Please read the thread before criticizing. This is ALL discussed. It WAS appropriate and warranted through 911 and OP level of education.
    I read the who thing.

    It was not appropriate to initiate compressions on a patient with pulses. There is nothing in BLS that says otherwise.
  11. by   hopefulRN'17
    Quote from ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Um, if the patient had a perfusing rhythm, you shouldn't have been doing compressions.

    If the kid was so stable that EMS didn't see the need for transport, even more so.

    And effective CPR is traumatic.

    I'm truly stunned that you did CPR on a patient for three minutes and that didn't even buy the kid a basic ED work up.
    I have similar thoughts but am a new nurse and didn't think that I should say anything.

    I am happy she was there for this student as it must have been scary for the both of them. However ... the thing that made my heart sink the most about this situation was the response (multiple times) stating that she did chest compressions because she was told to... even though she questioned it and thought it was weird.. she did it because she was told to. That scares me... maybe its the still scared student in me, IDK but it was drilled into us that if someone tells us to do something that we in the slightest bit question.... we better have a good explanation other than we were told to.
  12. by   Queen of Icepacks
    I too was hesitant to jump in here but for the person with basic CPR AED the Red Cross no longer even checks pulses. CPR is to be started for the unresponsive patient that is not breathing. If you are unable or unwilling to perform rescue breathing then Compression only CPR may be done.
  13. by   lifelearningrn
    Quote from hopefulRN'17
    I have similar thoughts but am a new nurse and didn't think that I should say anything.

    I am happy she was there for this student as it must have been scary for the both of them. However ... the thing that made my heart sink the most about this situation was the response (multiple times) stating that she did chest compressions because she was told to... even though she questioned it and thought it was weird.. she did it because she was told to. That scares me... maybe its the still scared student in me, IDK but it was drilled into us that if someone tells us to do something that we in the slightest bit question.... we better have a good explanation other than we were told to.
    You went to nursing school. The OP Is a MA, and as such she followed the orders from the 911 operator, which is what she was supposed to do.

close