Calling parents

  1. Ok, so this afternoon my principal stops in and tells that I need to call every parent for anything besides a bandaid. He asked how I made a decision as to who to call. I replied, "nursing judgment". He said parents want to be kept in the loop more and I am to call for all but the most minor things. Apparently my five years of college and 30+ years of experience no longer matter. It just seems that the longer I do this, the less parents trust me. Not just me but the teachers too, and the schools in general. You want called at work every time your kid asks for a TUMS after lunch, sure, I can so that. Oh, and I am in high school, not elementary. Now of course I will follow the directive I was given, but really? Not sure if this post is more of a rant or a question, but is anyone else dealing with this type of thing?
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    About peacockblue

    Joined: Apr '15; Posts: 262; Likes: 551

    45 Comments

  3. by   WineRN
    This is very rant worthy. and HIGH SCHOOL?! C'mon now! Parents will probably start asking you to STOP calling and interrupting their work days every time Suzie has a stomach ache before a test.
  4. by   nmr79
    Ugh! Totally rant-worthy!
    I'm guessing there are a few parents with nothing better to do than worry about their little snowflake's sensitive tummy, but the parents who actually have things to do with their time will get annoyed quickly. Is there an option to email them for non-emergencies? I feel like half of my parents here respond better/more quickly when I reach out via email (obviously not for time-sensitive things).
  5. by   peacockblue
    I'm just frustrated. I was even told to put a note in my sub folder for the subs to call for everything. I'm sure this is all happening because ONE parent complained. For goodness sake, by the time they get to me most of them have already called their parent to come get them anyways. I HATE THE END OF THE YEAR!!!
  6. by   OldDude
    Sounds like you still have the freedom to interpret "minor." wink...wink
  7. by   pedi_nurse
    I just interviewed for a district that requires some form of communication (phone, email, note) for EVERY student seen in the clinic. Just ridiculous. As OldDude said, sounds like you can keep using your nursing judgment here. I like to offer kids (middle school) the option of calling parents to bring medication for headache/stomachache before sending them back to class. Most of them say no, because the parent is working, but it's an easy way to curb some frustrated parents.

    So sorry this happened! Definitely frustrating!
  8. by   Rubor
    Wow that's super ridiculous and a complete waste of time.
  9. by   Glitternurse
    There are some parents that "need" to be called for everything, which is a waste of my time since half the time they don't answer, the other half they come to pick their child up because they skinned their knee.
    Only one school in the district wants parents to be notified for everything, but fortunately if it's minor and the student is sent back to class the secretaries will call. The other schools let me use my own judgement.
  10. by   mc3
    OK, then, do this. For each child that comes up, use an average of 5 minutes per phone call (look up the number, make the call usually leaving messages, talking to parent when they call back). Multiply by the number of visits per day, i.e. 30 visits x 5 minutes each equals 150 minutes. Divided by 60 = 2.5 hrs. Per day. Instead of seeing sick children taking care of meds and handing emergencies. Does he really think that is a wise use of your time??? I swear some of these principals have academic smarts but are truly clueless in the real world...
    Good luck!
  11. by   halohg
    My gut reaction since you are dealing with high schoolers is for them to call Mommy as they enter the office. So Suzy walks in with a headache, I would say pick up the phone or text and let Mom know you came to the health office for a HA. 2nd thought is I would document nearly all as minor injury, S&S minor, etc.
  12. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    UGH. That is rant worthy! I work MS and HS and calls are for legit things - I don't bother parents for minor issues and thankfully most (because we all I know I still have a list of some parents to call for everything) like it that way. They trust me to take care of their child while their child is in school. I don't make many phone calls and when I do, they are longer and I log them. But part of my mission with HS kids to is help them be ready to take responsibility of their health by the time they graduate.

    But perhaps you can have a handy note system - I do have those as well, "your child was seen in the nurse's office note." I used it more when I worked elementary.
  13. by   rn4kiddos
    It is ridiculous that you should have to call parents of high schoolers for everything other than a band aid. What if the student is 18? I have a much younger student population (pre k and K). If I were to call for every visit, I would get nothing done. Rather than call, I use an app called Remind. I can text parents and they can text me - I can also sent out a global message to all parents. not nearly as time consuming as calling, plus it has the added feature of translating - since most of the parents in my school speak spanish. Remind
  14. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from mc3
    OK, then, do this. For each child that comes up, use an average of 5 minutes per phone call (look up the number, make the call usually leaving messages, talking to parent when they call back). Multiply by the number of visits per day, i.e. 30 visits x 5 minutes each equals 150 minutes. Divided by 60 = 2.5 hrs. Per day. Instead of seeing sick children taking care of meds and handing emergencies. Does he really think that is a wise use of your time??? I swear some of these principals have academic smarts but are truly clueless in the real world...
    Good luck!
    OOOOHHH the maths!!! Good job!

    Seriously....rant worthy, yes. I would use my judgment to interpret minor if this was my directive and I'd also do a lot of emailing or get me a triplicate form with check boxes (charge that to the principal) and hand one copy to the student. Because you don't have to have a conversation every time you're notifying a parent. Right?

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