And Just Like That...

  1. they walk out of your life....

    My young man, who I have seen so much growth in this year, just came by to say, "So long." 4 years ago before I ever met him, we had already been informed of student ODD and other diagnosis that made it very hard to control his temper. So I already had an expectation of how he was going to be. They had said in this initial meeting, that "if he thinks you are for him, he will be good. However, if he thinks you are against him, he will be combative." Apparently he had been know to throw things and get violent. Well, I decided to "be for him." His walk through high school has not been a cake walk by no means, but he always knew he could come to my office an vent. I would make him watch his language and not hit things, but I would let him pace and talk. I have notice such a maturing in him, it's almost like night and day.

    I hate to see him go, but glad he ended his high school career on a good note. He will walk and get his diploma on 5/31.

    (Wow! never thought I would be this sad/proud to see him go
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  2. Visit cooties_are_real profile page

    About cooties_are_real

    Joined: Apr '12; Posts: 322; Likes: 884
    from TX , US
    Specialty: 10 year(s) of experience in School

    12 Comments

  3. by   nmr79
    Aw, I have one like that.
    I also have many 8th graders who can't get out soon enough
  4. by   NutmeggeRN
    Job well done!!
  5. by   MHDNURSE
    This made me teary.
  6. by   LikeTheDeadSea
    CHILLS.
  7. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    AWWW. This is why I love being a school nurse. For every frustration, you have stories like this. And they make you realize what a difference you can actually make in a student's live, even when all you do feels insignificant.
  8. by   pedi_nurse
    I LOVE this! I'm at a lower income school (87% ED) and anger management is a challenge even for many of our neurotypical kids. Often, these kids are met with anger from the teachers, which doesn't help much. A battle of wills is never ideal. I always strive to make my clinic a place of respite for these kiddos and it warms my heart to know that others do the same! It truly can make a difference in kids lives when someone doesn't balk or react negatively to their emotions. How else are they to learn to manage them if we can't model that for them?!?! I'm SO PROUD of you! Thank you for being an amazing nurse!
  9. by   audreysmagic
    Sometimes, we win life's little battles. <3 Love this!
  10. by   cooties_are_real
    Quote from JenTheSchoolRN
    AWWW. This is why I love being a school nurse. For every frustration, you have stories like this. And they make you realize what a difference you can actually make in a student's live, even when all you do feels insignificant.

    YES!!! Even this morning I find myself almost teary eyed once again. With this tough year, I'm choosing to focus on the successes!
  11. by   audreysmagic
    Quote from cooties_are_real
    YES!!! Even this morning I find myself almost teary eyed once again. With this tough year, I'm choosing to focus on the successes!
    My kids made me cry in good ways all the time when I did school nursing. One kid in special ed called me "Doctor" all year. On my last day there at the end of the school year, he hugged me in his usual way and said, "I love you, Miss Audreysmagic!" I didn't even know he remembered my name before that!
  12. by   kbrn2002
    I wish my nephew would've had somebody as compassionate and understanding at school as you obviously are. He is high functioning autistic and prone to emotional outbursts. Yelling, cussing, throwing things, breaking things have been his go-to behaviors when life frustrates him. At home he had a "safe" room where he was allowed to do whatever he felt he needed to.

    Nobody at school had any understanding or compassion for his condition. He missed a ton of school, either because he was legitimately ill from the emotional stress of facing school or because he just flat out refused to go. He was never given the type of educational support he needed to succeed and dropped out as soon as he was legally able.

    He has matured incredibly and outbursts now are extremely rare but he is still facing an adult life with adult responsibilities and no high school diploma. Fortunately he is starting to show some interest in getting his GED. I can't help but think that having even one person in the school system on his side would have made all the difference in the world. Good for you for being that one person that made a difference in this young man's life, you may have done way more to help him and his family than you even know. Thank you for that.
  13. by   OldDude
    One of my favorite recollections is, as kbrn2002's nephew, a higher functioning kid with autism entered KG. I was standing with the coach in the gym and we both noticed this guy running toward the red box on the wall. We both immediately took chase but weren't fast enough before he pulled the fire alarm. He became quite famous for that. Last year he came through for his senior walk and "we" got our picture taken with him in his cap and gown, reaching out to pull that same fire alarm as I was holding him back! He calls me every year on my birthday...never forgets.

    This year I'm saying farewell to my kid with Type 1. I've seen this guy at least 3 times a day for the past six years and now he's moving on...gulp.
  14. by   Amethya
    A lot of my 8th graders are leaving this year and I know I'll be sad for them to leave.

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