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Salting my ice now

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by ruby_jane ruby_jane, BSN, RN (Member) Nurse

ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

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I don't allow my ice packs out except for very special circumstances, but I also don't allow lingering.  I don't allow the friend that had to walk them to the nurse to stay, unless it's a kinder and then once they start laughing and goofing with one another i cut them loose.  Also, once the icepack becomes a toy, buh bye.   I find that most of my ice needers don't really stay that long once you take the joy out of it and for the ones that do stay longer saying it still hurts, it makes it that much easier to know if i need to make that CYA call to get  Jimmy's sore wrist x-rayed.  

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CanIcallmymom has 4 years experience.

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21 minutes ago, Flare said:

I don't allow my ice packs out except for very special circumstances, but I also don't allow lingering.  I don't allow the friend that had to walk them to the nurse to stay, unless it's a kinder and then once they start laughing and goofing with one another i cut them loose.  Also, once the icepack becomes a toy, buh bye.   I find that most of my ice needers don't really stay that long once you take the joy out of it and for the ones that do stay longer saying it still hurts, it makes it that much easier to know if i need to make that CYA call to get  Jimmy's sore wrist x-rayed.  

Easy in HS when you tell them to put their phone away! haha

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Feral.Cat.Herder has 22 years experience and specializes in Peds, MS, DIDD, Corrections, HH, LTC.

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I learned from an old school nurse that a wet paper towel in a baggie (placed in freezer) works as well as ice in a baggie. It's more pliable and less attractive to students. As the ice machines in my district crap out they are not being replaced and all the clinic nurses will be using frozen wet paper towels in baggies aka cold packs. 

Another advantage to the "cold packs" you can make up bunches at a time and have them in the freezer ready to go! 

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Can you use frozen paper towels in plastic sandwich bags? That’s what we had when I was in elementary. Cheap and inedible.

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

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On 5/11/2019 at 6:36 PM, rn&run said:

Can you use frozen paper towels in plastic sandwich bags? That’s what we had when I was in elementary. Cheap and inedible.

I don't actually have a freezer here. I have a six-pack cooler full of ice.

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MrNurse(x2) has 28 years experience as a ADN and specializes in IMC, school nursing.

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On 5/9/2019 at 5:14 PM, OldDude said:

I learned from this site...don’t let the ice packs leave the clinic. I was blown away  at how the usage decreased. I would estimate at least a 75% decrease. 

I have my stopwatch out to see how long these ice packs are used when students are held in the office. Average? Fifteen seconds!

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Alex Egan has 9 years experience as a LPN, EMT-B and specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing.

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Salt makes the ice colder and increases risk of injury. See the salt ice challenge. I have better luck with vinegar. Just a bit and a shake. Now no one wants your ice.  

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CanIcallmymom has 4 years experience.

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12 minutes ago, Alex Egan said:

Salt makes the ice colder and increases risk of injury. See the salt ice challenge. I have better luck with vinegar. Just a bit and a shake. Now no one wants your ice.  

Ohhhh! Even better!

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On 5/10/2019 at 5:15 AM, CampyCamp said:

My kids just don't work that way. They will sit out their perceived injury in the health room even during recess. If I let them sit in the sick room, they get too cozy. If I put them in the waiting area, they act as walmart greeters and triage nurses. If I have them sit near me, they stare as I do paperwork or eat my breakfast. So if it's recess, they stay but any other time, they can hold ice in class. I presume it ends up neglected on the desk. 

This is how my kids are, too. I hand out ice packs (not actual ice, but the frozen packs) and ask them to bring it back to me or drop at front desk. About 25% of them are returned, which I'm fine with. 99% of the time the injury/issue does not require ice or any treatment, but I know the placebo affect is helpful for them. 

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

3 Followers; 8,298 Visitors; 2,287 Posts

1 hour ago, Alex Egan said:

Salt makes the ice colder and increases risk of injury. See the salt ice challenge. I have better luck with vinegar. Just a bit and a shake. Now no one wants your ice.  

That's why I water 'em down as well!

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