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RN. To Me Means Real Nurse.

Students Article   (22,219 Views | 51 Replies | 1,279 Words)

Julie Reyes has 6 years experience and specializes in pediatrics, occupational health.

1 Follower; 44 Articles; 65,474 Profile Views; 260 Posts

The road to becoming a real nurse is filled with bumps, trips, joy, and tears. Students learn from nurses who teach them invaluable real life lessons in nursing. Nothing is more effective than the experience gained in nursing school clinicals. Preceptors are a crucial key in teaching nursing students how to be a nurse, or how to be an RN. You are reading page 4 of RN. To Me Means Real Nurse.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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When I graduated in 2010 I had a limited amount of nurses that instructed us as preceptors those that did I learned a lot. Unfortunately though there were the ones who ate us alive. Now as a seasoned nurse precepting the next generation of nurses I can see both sides. On the days my nurse to patient ratio is low I teach a lot more and on those days it's high I send them on their own so I can get things done. I think about this when I do it but really don't know how to improve it

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39 Posts; 1,834 Profile Views

Having been an LPN for close to twenty years, many insults have been tossed my way, as previously mentioned, I am a real nurse to my core. I am closing the gap between licensed practical and registered nurse currently. What a place to be... an LPN, RN student and many times educator to students from both the LPN/RN programs that come into my facility. I like having the chance to work with students, I always hope they have a positive , FUN experience and can look to the seasoned nurses as caring! I am glad to have read the article in its entirety!

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,584 Posts; 65,704 Profile Views

Great article. You are very articulate and accurate.

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AdamantiteEnigma has 13 years experience.

183 Posts; 5,148 Profile Views

There is no need to edit the title. The OP cannot help it if people are reading things into this that aren't there. If you read the article, you know that there is no ill intent at all.

Maybe some members should think about what a REAL NURSE is. A real nurse is one who assesses the situation thoroughly before making a judgement call. Assessment, after all, is the first step of the nursing process.

I don't agree.

I can choose language in any comment I've made on this website or elsewhere that is inflammitory to those in another title, but I don't. And this is because my intent is to share, and not offend. And if I did choose language that other people informed me was offensive to the reader, I would amend it. With an apology if necessary.

My assessment skills are top notch btw. I wouldn't have prospered in ED's otherwise.

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89 Posts; 3,701 Profile Views

LPNs and RNs are real nurses. While nursing students, they are training to be real nurses.

Enough said

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NCRN2010 has 20 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case Management.

26 Posts; 2,260 Profile Views

The title of this article caught my eye and for a split second it made me defensive. This defensive reaction encouraged me to read the article. This is a wonderfully written article and in no way belittles the important role that all nurses have in healthcare.

My personal journey in nursing began in the supply department in a rural hospital. I witnessed the compassion and professional attitudes of the nurses and I was in awe. From my exposure at that rural hospital I was motivated to pursue my CNA, LPN, RN, and BSN. I possess more knowledge than the person I was working in the supply department, but I am fundamentally the same caring, empathetic, loving person, regardless of the initials after my name. It is impossible to teach someone the necessary personal characteristics it takes to be a nurse. It isn't a job, it is who I am.

My precepting experiences as a student were for the most part pleasant. I didn't experience hostility towards me. If I did I was too oblivious to notice. In my career working side by side other nurses and witnessing the interactions of student and preceptor, I am embarrassed and ashamed of many of my co-workers. I love the role of preceptor. I view it as an investment in the nursing profession. The nurses I train may be the nurses taking care of me one day. :yes:

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serenity1 has 7 years experience and specializes in labor & delivery.

266 Posts; 8,229 Profile Views

No one should have to edit their article/comments just because a select few look for things to be offended by. The OP already stated what her intentions were. It was in no way intended to be a dig at anyone else. To her, obtaining her RN meant she was finally a Real Nurse instead of a student nurse. She has every right to choose the words that express her feelings. There are many on this site that intentionally choose inflammatory words/comments to stir the pot. This OP is not one of them.

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2 Posts; 385 Profile Views

LPN's ARE real nurses too, we too have been left in situations we should not have been left in. I relied on my experience as an EMT when these situations were thrust upon me. Over the years as I gained more experience working in a hospital on a telemetry unit I became a preceptor for new hires. RN's and LPN's, it was not uncommon for an RN to come to me for help. not just the new grads. I am not sure whether the comment was insinuating that RN's are real nurses and LPN's are "pretend" nurses. Many LPN's have heard this all before, the real nurse and the pretend nurse. I love being a nurse and have always thought it petty when someone wants to call RN's real nurses and LPN's pretend nurses. We all know there are good nurses and not so good nurses on both sides no matter what license they hold. :-)

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RN. has 29 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Perianesthesia.

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I'm quite sure that the intent was innocent, however, does that innocence dwarf the title of the thread?

Is it better to have labeled the thread something innocuous, and then turn around and state inflammatory comments within the thread?

It has been my observation in this case that the only opinions that truly matter are the moderators and author of this thread. None of those mentioned in the prior statement seem to be upset by the title, so it remains. This is despite several comments from LPN's and LVN's who have expressed that they have experienced emotional pain from hearing the title of this thread spoken to them as an insult. Repeatedly. Over many years.

An apology or explanation about how the title doesn't mean what they think it means is not going to make the initial opinion go away.

Miss Manners would surely not approve......

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Julie Reyes has 6 years experience and specializes in pediatrics, occupational health.

1 Follower; 44 Articles; 260 Posts; 65,474 Profile Views

I don't agree.

I can choose language in any comment I've made on this website or elsewhere that is inflammitory to those in another title, but I don't. And this is because my intent is to share, and not offend. And if I did choose language that other people informed me was offensive to the reader, I would amend it. With an apology if necessary.

My assessment skills are top notch btw. I wouldn't have prospered in ED's otherwise.

I find it funny, ironic really, that people who are finding offense at a SINCERELY innocent choice of title to a thoughtfully written and heartfelt article have NO PROBLEM in their chance to offend (if I were offended) me on their point of view by their attacks in this thread.

I also find it interesting that no one ever even considered that some of the nurses - the REAL NURSES that this student turned teacher had in nursing school, could have been an LPN, while some of the horrible nurses I had were registered nurses. Why would I have to share that in this article? That was not even the point of it.

However, for the sake of the witch hunters and those so easily screaming "offense", the OB nurse that I had mentioned in the article IS an LPN, and she in fact, loves this article. That could be because she understands the sincerity and admiration I have towards her. She is a nurse who is top notch, cares about her patients with passion, and shows it in every way she serves. She is a Real Nurse, in every sense of the word.

And, AdamantiteEnigma, no one ever attacked your skills as a nurse, and I am not sure why you feel the need to point out that your skills are top notch, but I am sure that any patients you have are lucky to have you, and I hope that any students you teach are as well.

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NurseOnAMotorcycle has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg, Emergency, CEN.

1 Article; 1,065 Posts; 24,030 Profile Views

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Raviepoo specializes in hospice.

318 Posts; 8,799 Profile Views

My favorite nursing joke, told to me by a dialysis patient several years ago:

What does LPN stand for?

Low paid nurse.

What does RN stand for?

Rich nurse. (as if!)

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