Grading - academic integrity CCRI

  1. I posted this to the Student Nursing forum - but since it is local (Meaning CCRI) I wanted to post here and see if I could get some reactions:

    I recently found out that a fellow student will be getting an A in Physiology - good for her but she actually earned an 87 with 10 points of extra credit on each exam and was graded on a curve. I am not debating the merits of extra credit, we all can use help in difficult courses, however my issue is with the fact that if this is true and if she is taking the same course we should be held to the same standards.

    At mid-term I had a solid B with an 85 on two out of three exams. I received a C for the class. What my final exam grade was has not been communicated to me. I am not happy with this grade but that is what I earned. My class was not given extra credit options and was not graded on a curve. There were many students in my class who had to withdraw from the class because they were not meeting the standards required for admittance into the nursing program. However if they had the other professor then they may have ended the class with B's or A's. How can this be justified?

    My GPA is now 3.75, which is not bad. However with the grade of a C in Physiology I can forget about being accepted through the merit based system. Another student who in reality earned a lower grade than I did but based on a curve and some extra credit will be allowed into the program before me or other students in the same situation. I believe there should be some uniformity to the standards of grading if the school is to expect the same integrity from it's students, especially if this affects a student's chances of admittance into a very competitive program.
  2. Visit duckzoom75 profile page

    About duckzoom75

    Joined: Nov '05; Posts: 15

    12 Comments

  3. by   Billy_baroo
    Hi Duck,

    I have just finished the requirements for night-time Nursing at CCRI. My professor in Human Phsy would not grade on the curve and certainly did not offer extra credit.

    Sadly, like most educational settings, the teachers will never teach the same way and "unfairness" will occur. In my opinion, psyc classes should be the only classes that are graded with a curve.

    I agree with your assessment; I just wish I could offer a solution. Sorry.

    I have been informed that Anatomy, Physiology, and the TEAS will be the deciding factors for performance based acceptance.


    Best of luck,
    Bill
  4. by   duckzoom75
    Hey Bill -


    I doubt I will be finishing my degree at CCRI anyway. But may have just as much a problem getting in elswhere now.

    I thought that the nursing program did not take grades that were curved? Maybe its that the nursing classes don't grade on a curve.

    Lessons Learned -

    Research your Professors BEFORE you take the class. (I will save you all some trouble...

    Life isn't always fair


    Duck
    Last edit by sirI on Aug 4, '07 : Reason: please do not post names of your profs/instructors - try and protect their identity(s)
  5. by   Billy_baroo
    No, I had X in Providence. Good professor.

    On to Microbiology!!!!
    Last edit by sirI on Aug 4, '07 : Reason: please do not post names of your profs/instructors - try and protect their identity(s0
  6. by   crissy2629
    Hey I had X too! Were you the one man in the class??
    Last edit by sirI on Aug 4, '07 : Reason: please do not post names of your profs/instructors - try and protect their identity(s)
  7. by   Billy_baroo
    sunday mornings...yep..that was me
  8. by   laurainri
    MOST science professors dont grade on a curve but some are a lot harder than others. The first time I took phys I didn't learn a thing and I passed with a B. I later learned that this professor took all the St. Joe's nursing students and his job was to make sure the class passed. I busted my butt in that class and others didn't even make an effort and everybody passed. I learned nothing though. When I found out I was actually in the nursing program I sat in on another professors class just so I would be able to understand what I missed the first time around. And NO nursing professors do not scale. They may throw a question out or give credit on two of the multiple choice questions but even that is rare.
  9. by   GadgetRN71
    I say it's about time CCRI went to performance based acceptance...when I was trying to get in, it was first come first served waiting list nonsense..Most nursing schools in the US did away with this years ago-glad to see CCRI is finally moving with the times and has stopped catering to those who can't hack it and have no business in nursing school. This sounds harsh but it don't believe any science teacher should grade on a curve-either you understand the info or not.
  10. by   cmo421
    It is difficult to get into CCRI for a few reasons. The lack of teachers in nursing is one of them. I am a grad of CCRI Nursing from many years ago,(28), I was 17 when I started and not yet 19 when I graduated and was licenced as a RN. It was then, a very tough program,as it is now. Hence why most of its grads pass boards on the first try and have great clinical skills.
    May I say that just because u can muster past all the tough science courses and get great grades, does not mean a great nurse. I have meet many who can fly in school, but do not do well in the clinical setting.
    Nursing is as much a personality as it is a profession!
  11. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from cmo421
    It is difficult to get into CCRI for a few reasons. The lack of teachers in nursing is one of them. I am a grad of CCRI Nursing from many years ago,(28), I was 17 when I started and not yet 19 when I graduated and was licenced as a RN. It was then, a very tough program,as it is now. Hence why most of its grads pass boards on the first try and have great clinical skills.
    May I say that just because u can muster past all the tough science courses and get great grades, does not mean a great nurse. I have meet many who can fly in school, but do not do well in the clinical setting.
    Nursing is as much a personality as it is a profession!
    I'm going to respectfully disagree with you on this...One of the reasons nurses don't get respect is because somehow, the "personality" takes precedence over the skills and scientific knowledge that nurses need to have. Not bragging here, but I got A's in all of my prereq's(except physiology-got a B)and did extremely well in clinical. I also am a good nurse. I still say that if you consistently have problems with the math and science classes(especially dosages-this is 5th grade math!) perhaps nursing isn't the wisest career choice. Just because it is someones fondest wish to be a nurse doesn't mean that they should be one.
    Yes, there are always exceptions, but by and large, unintelligent people tend not to make competent nurses.
  12. by   cmo421
    Quote from WitchyRN
    I'm going to respectfully disagree with you on this...One of the reasons nurses don't get respect is because somehow, the "personality" takes precedence over the skills and scientific knowledge that nurses need to have. Not bragging here, but I got A's in all of my prereq's(except physiology-got a B)and did extremely well in clinical. I also am a good nurse. I still say that if you consistently have problems with the math and science classes(especially dosages-this is 5th grade math!) perhaps nursing isn't the wisest career choice. Just because it is someones fondest wish to be a nurse doesn't mean that they should be one.
    Yes, there are always exceptions, but by and large, unintelligent people tend not to make competent nurses.

    Always good to agree to disagree. I have to say that "unintelligent" people ,as u say, brings in a broad range of people. Math is a necessary skill to master, and it can be by most . Also there are many tools available to assist in this. But , I would bet my shoes that u will find more so called "intelligent" people making mistakes out there then those that had to struggle. In years past I have found that those who have struggled academically to succeed,take more time to check their doses,ask more questions,follow procedures and practice guidelines and do not take their "degree" for granted.
    Many so called "intelligent" students, come out of school feeling superior(RN itis) and well prepared for their career. Well as most people will tell u that school provides a foundation but is not much more then that. The real learning takes place in the experiences to come and ones openess to osmosis like learning. Gut feeling,ability to set priority,pt.advocacy,team working, "gray" area thinking, are all skills that come with practice and time,and the openess to learn from others.
    I am not saying that "intelligence" does not play a major part of nursing. I am just saying that there are many different kinds of intelligence.
  13. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from cmo421
    Always good to agree to disagree. I have to say that "unintelligent" people ,as u say, brings in a broad range of people. Math is a necessary skill to master, and it can be by most . Also there are many tools available to assist in this. But , I would bet my shoes that u will find more so called "intelligent" people making mistakes out there then those that had to struggle. In years past I have found that those who have struggled academically to succeed,take more time to check their doses,ask more questions,follow procedures and practice guidelines and do not take their "degree" for granted.
    Many so called "intelligent" students, come out of school feeling superior(RN itis) and well prepared for their career. Well as most people will tell u that school provides a foundation but is not much more then that. The real learning takes place in the experiences to come and ones openess to osmosis like learning. Gut feeling,ability to set priority,pt.advocacy,team working, "gray" area thinking, are all skills that come with practice and time,and the openess to learn from others.
    I am not saying that "intelligence" does not play a major part of nursing. I am just saying that there are many different kinds of intelligence.
    I do agree that there are many different kinds of intelligence-we all have our strong spots and our weaknesses. I'm talking about the people who don't have adequate reading skills, can barely add, multiply etc.(one girl took dosages 5 times.5!) :uhoh21:Trust me, in many of my classes there were people like this. Sounds harsh, but until you can do these very basic things, you have no business in a nursing program. I stand by my assertion that going to performance based acceptance is a good thing for CCRI, students who actually belong there and of course, patients.
    I also agree with you that prioritization and critical thinking really get honed in the workplace, not necessarily in school.
  14. by   drmorton2b
    One thing about CCRI is that they do not have C- or C+ they have just a C. Performance based vs. waiting list may or may not make a difference. I work with Diploma nurses, BSNs, ADNs, MSNs. Some of who recently came out of a non-wait list program, and this particular nurse shouldn't be a nurse has the wrong attitude and has horrible interpersonal workplace skills.

    I think having an LPN or CNA requirement before one enters the RN program would help. It don't matter though I have dealt with Nurses with BSNs new grads who can't figure out that half of 50=25 and 1 100MG tablet=100, so you would give 1/2 of the 50 MG tablet and, 1 100 MG tablet. What does she do? She gives the whole 50 MG tablet and 1 100 MG tablet= 150 MG.

    Its the personality and caring about the job that counts, and willing to be on the ball and utilizing your skills.
    Last edit by drmorton2b on Oct 10, '07

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