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Resume Questions!

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by ceefde9891 ceefde9891 (New) New

1,344 Profile Views; 13 Posts

Hey everyone! I have a few questions for my resume...

I finished an Associates degree nursing program a few months ago and I will begin my RN-BSN program shortly. Should I put that down on my resume? And if so, how should it be written? I wrote in my cover letter that I will be continuing my education in a BSN program but should I write it in the education part of my resume as well? So far it looks like this on my resume:

Name of School

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) 2012-2014

Name of School

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) 2009-2011

Is this ok?

Also, should my clinical experience be written on my resume? I have been told that it is not necessary and should not be put down but I don't have any major experience so I feel this will add to my resume and make it look better. Any suggestions??

Let me know what you all think. Thank you!

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craziechiq is a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

1 Article; 208 Posts; 3,573 Profile Views

Why is it AAS? Mine is similar except that:

Name of School

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Anticipated May 2013

Name of School

Associate of Science in Nursing May 2011

I left my clinical experience out as employers don't view that as true employment since every school requires it. I did use my preceptorship, though.

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13 Posts; 1,344 Profile Views

My school's official degree is called an AAS...don't know why it's not called an ADN but I believe the two are pretty much the same thing.

Thanks for your help!

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135 Posts; 4,514 Profile Views

I think that the 'Anticipated 2013' is good advice.

However, I am on the opposite side of the fence concerning clinical experience on a resume. I put it on mine and I have successful in landing interviews and my current position with it.

As a new grad, I layed each clinical out as a job and put the things that were unique to that rotation. Ex. in psych I was able to be in ECT. I put in IV's, maintained an airway after the procedure and re-oriented the pt. Not everyone gets to do that, so I put it on there. I didn't have any healthcare experience going in so my clinicals were all I had to make me shine. I used that and all of my volunteer exp. I landed three interviews after school off that resume so it worked in my favor.

Now that I have a full-time position, I condensed all of my clinicals into one and picked out the most unique experiences. Then I added my other non-healthcare jobs and used all the transferable skills to sell myself. Once I land a new full-time postion and I have a variety of experience I will remove it completely. I guess it's up to you, but for me it has worked out just fine using them.

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17 Posts; 1,354 Profile Views

I just sent my resume into my schools career center to review. when they wrote back they had reformatted it to what you had written. your on the write track! I also put my clinical experiance on my resume. THey advised me to do so since i did not have much experiance.

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157 Posts; 3,444 Profile Views

I have been told by experts and HR that clinical experience does not get you the job and do not have to be listed on your resume. It is a given fact that every prospective nurse employee has had some form of clinical experience in school. Yes, it identifies that you are familiar with units of that hospital, but one's clinical experience is strictly what you make out of it. For example, I earned my job by working hard on the unit and actively learning everything possible. The unit manager came up to me at the end of the rotation and offered me my dream job.......... In addition, manager like new grad resumes specifically to one page long, and if you include clinical sites then it will be much longer and they are less likely to read it all. However, your cover letter is were you sale you self . (Sorry if there are any typos I am typing on my cell. )

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135 Posts; 4,514 Profile Views

I do want to add if you do choose to leave it out I would at least put in a cover letter or condense on your resume to at least show the floors you were on and which hospitals you were at. The reason is because hospitals are partial to students who did their clinicals there.

Also, ex. if you were on a tele/CVSU floor then they may be partial to at least interviewing you because you did your clinicals on tele, and are familiar with what you are applying for.

I do agree that you really are selling yourself in the cover letter, but you sell yourself in your resume too. Especially if you attend any job fairs where you may have 8-9 different floors that are hiring. The hospitals in my area didn't tell us which floors would be present so I had a very generalized cover letter at the job fairs. I called HR to try to find out and they wouldn't give me the info. What got the NM to pay attention to my resume was my clinical experience. When there are 250 applicants for 3 spots, having that experience on paper for them to see gives you an upper-hand. I guess it depends on the situation. If you apply for a single position directly then the cover letter is a great selling point.

Edited by poopprincess

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