Report: is it too much to ask.....

Posted
by ixchel ixchel Member Nurse

Specializes in critical care.

....that report be given with accurate information?

Sometimes report is given before physicians make their notes, so what you have to go by is what the previous nurse says. I'm so frustrated that people just regurgitate information without taking the time to see if it's right, or current information.

It's just frustrating. I know it's the oncoming nurse's responsibility to ensure everything is accurate. Shouldn't we be able to trust what we're told in report, though?

Just a vent. I had one nurse tell me two very incorrect things on two different patients last week. One of those things probably was passed on in report multiple consecutive shifts and I'm the one who caught the inaccuracy, which was huge. The other thing, I didn't catch and ended up in the hot seat. No adverse outcomes, thankfully.

iPink, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum. Has 9 years experience. 1,414 Posts

On my previous unit by the time we got report and passed morning meds, it was time to make rounds with the Hospitalist. Sometimes I didn't get the time to verify some things. I had them highlighted on my sheet, but didn't get around to it.

Sometimes when a nurse is known to give you misinformation, that's when you take the time to verify things during report. One thing I'll never do is throw a fellow nurse under the bus for an MD. I had one ask for the nurse's name and told him I didn't remember. He left it alone.

Sent from iPink's phone via allnurses app

RN403, BSN, RN

1 Article; 1,068 Posts

This is what I like about bedside report. While the off-going nurse is talking I am looking and verifying that what she/he is saying is correct. Trust, but, verify.

SierraBravo

SierraBravo

Has 3 years experience. 547 Posts

To the OP: I couldn't agree more with your post. I am a type A person and I pride myself on giving accurate, thorough information in report. I take the time to read the H&P and pass along that information in report. I've had it happen twice that I've received inaccurate information which was likely perpetuated along from nurse to nurse. Since then, I look everything up myself. Actually, all I really want in report is the intangible things that I can't get from the EMR, like how does the patient ambulate, were there any significant events today, etc... Everything else I can get from the chart like what kind of IV access the patient has, how their VS have been, what their assessment looks like, etc...

I strongly disagree with doing a bedside report. First of all, the patient likely won't understand half of what is being said. Secondly, if the patient has any type of anxiety they will likely ask what something you said means, which defeats the purpose of report since it is supposed to be given with minimal interruptions and in a place conducive to good communication. I think that it makes sense for the oncoming and offgoing nurse to lay eyes on the patient together at shift change once report has been given so that the oncoming nurse can verify accuracy of any drips, O2, etc...

Do-over, ASN, RN

Specializes in CICU. 1,085 Posts

As for me, I think bedside report is essential - especially in critical care. If you find yourself getting bogus info - open that computer up at the bedside. We are supposed to, although it doesn't always happen. Believe me, though, if I know I am dealing with someone that habitually leaves orders or meds undone - open that chart and look at it.

Allowing the patient (and/or his or her family/advocate) to participate may feel inconvenient... But, that is the point and it is about them, correct?

Besides, after a decent bedside report - I've got half my assessment done.

OhioCCRN, MSN, NP

Specializes in SICU. Has 11 years experience. 572 Posts

i agree 100%

and is it too much to ask that the room not be left like a tornado ran through it

or that the patient is not laying on blood soaked sheets that you covered with a chux

or that the blood that was ordered at 4am be given or at least pass it on that you did not do it...so that i don't look like an idiot when the MD rounds and all i can say is "um...what blood?"

urgh!

RunBabyRN

RunBabyRN

Specializes in L&D, infusion, urology. Has 2 years experience. 3,677 Posts

Even as a nursing student, I'd catch those errors. I wish there was always the time to delve thoroughly into someone's H&P, but it's not realistic most of the time. I'm grateful for any documented info I can get, but even that can be inconsistent.

SoaringOwl

SoaringOwl

Specializes in Med-Surg and Neuro. 143 Posts

I use different colors: one color for taking report, and one color for information I've gathered/assessed on my own. I verify the info given in report by circling it in my color, or crossing it out. When I give report to the next nurse or when a doc asks, I use the info in my color. I've learned to take everything from fellow nurses with a grain of salt. I don't blame anyone, I just only trust myself.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care. 5 Articles; 4,547 Posts

Even as a nursing student, I'd catch those errors. I wish there was always the time to delve thoroughly into someone's H&P, but it's not realistic most of the time. I'm grateful for any documented info I can get, but even that can be inconsistent.

I remember ranting about this in one of my write ups during internship. Unfortunately, as others here have said, you learn who you can trust and who you can't. A lot of the time, you can catch stuff in H&Ps and in other notes, but not always.

I do think, as someone said here and I did not quote, I am starting to be a fan of the quick and dirty report that shares only the stuff you don't find in the chart. Anything else seems to be a waste of time that could be spent looking up the stuff that you'll probably hear incorrectly anyway.

ixchel

Specializes in critical care. 5 Articles; 4,547 Posts

As for me, I think bedside report is essential - especially in critical care. If you find yourself getting bogus info - open that computer up at the bedside. We are supposed to, although it doesn't always happen. Believe me, though, if I know I am dealing with someone that habitually leaves orders or meds undone - open that chart and look at it.

Allowing the patient (and/or his or her family/advocate) to participate may feel inconvenient... But, that is the point and it is about them, correct?

Besides, after a decent bedside report - I've got half my assessment done.

I do love that part of bedside reporting - getting so much info before the shift has even truly begun. Bedside reporting is supposed to be mandatory now, but no one actually does it. I think I prefer it.

Do-over, ASN, RN

Specializes in CICU. 1,085 Posts

I do love that part of bedside reporting - getting so much info before the shift has even truly begun. Bedside reporting is supposed to be mandatory now, but no one actually does it. I think I prefer it.

I really like that I have actually laid eyes on the patient, and don't feel the need to run in the rooms immediately after report. Especially if I have one going sideways - I've already seen the other, even if I haven't done a complete head-to-toe - that can probably wait. It really helped me once I accepted that the patients have a RIGHT to hear report, and to participate in it. I don't think it is going away, and it started slowly at my last hospital - but they kept after it and it has become the norm.