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Registry while on travel contract - How?

Travel   (838 Views | 5 Replies)
by jjdd jjdd Member

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How exactly does it work? Who do I sign up with? Basically, looking to pick up shifts in my area during my off days. Are the companies that offer registry the same as the ones that offer per diem and 13 week contracts? Is per diem even the same as registry? 

Appreciate any pointers. 

Edited by jjdd

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34 Posts; 611 Profile Views

Anyone? 

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Registry usually refers to a private agency. Both private agencies and facilities can offer per diem (by the day) shifts. However facility hiring practices means it is impractical to get hired on as staff float or per diem inside of 13 weeks.

You may be able to work at another facility for your same agency on a per diem basis, but I doubt it. For one, they would have to pay you overtime but they can't bill for it until you have reached 40 hours. For many contracts you will be in technical violation as the language will say your entire professional efforts be devoted to your assignment.

So that leaves working for a different (and usually local) agency to pick up per diem shifts. It also means you will be working straight time at a lower hourly rate than your combined travel compensation. I've met travelers that do that, but it doesn't make financial sense.

The best is to pick assignments that offer overtime shifts. This is more likely to happen with rapid response companies such as Fastaff. Not only do these agencies offer higher rates than traditional travel, but often overtime is baked in with guaranteed 48 hours a week.

Be careful with traditional agencies. Sure you can find out in the manager interview if overtime is readily available, but often the OT rate sucks! If overtime is available, negotiate that separately. Here is the math:

Let's say you are getting $50 combined hourly compensation with $20 taxable hourly. Hour 41, your housing and per diem (meals and incidentals) stop adding to your check. Time and a half of $20 is $30 an hour, $20 an hour less than you received for hour 40. At the same time, many contracts will pay time and a half on the bill rate of (for example) $70 an hour, or $105 an hour while they are paying you $30 an hour!

Some agencies make a play for fairness by paying double time for all overtime. However, in the above example, that would be $40 an hour, better, but still a third less than your first 40 hour compensation. Negotiate!

Use a tool like the calculator found on PanTravelers to calculate total pay when you receive a complete offer. Don't take less than this number for overtime. Even at the same amount, you will be better off financially than working for a local agency.

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34 Posts; 611 Profile Views

On 6/1/2019 at 5:52 AM, NedRN said:

Registry usually refers to a private agency. Both private agencies and facilities can offer per diem (by the day) shifts. However facility hiring practices means it is impractical to get hired on as staff float or per diem inside of 13 weeks.

You may be able to work at another facility for your same agency on a per diem basis, but I doubt it. For one, they would have to pay you overtime but they can't bill for it until you have reached 40 hours. For many contracts you will be in technical violation as the language will say your entire professional efforts be devoted to your assignment.

So that leaves working for a different (and usually local) agency to pick up per diem shifts. It also means you will be working straight time at a lower hourly rate than your combined travel compensation. I've met travelers that do that, but it doesn't make financial sense.

The best is to pick assignments that offer overtime shifts. This is more likely to happen with rapid response companies such as Fastaff. Not only do these agencies offer higher rates than traditional travel, but often overtime is baked in with guaranteed 48 hours a week.

Be careful with traditional agencies. Sure you can find out in the manager interview if overtime is readily available, but often the OT rate sucks! If overtime is available, negotiate that separately. Here is the math:

Let's say you are getting $50 combined hourly compensation with $20 taxable hourly. Hour 41, your housing and per diem (meals and incidentals) stop adding to your check. Time and a half of $20 is $30 an hour, $20 an hour less than you received for hour 40. At the same time, many contracts will pay time and a half on the bill rate of (for example) $70 an hour, or $105 an hour while they are paying you $30 an hour!

Some agencies make a play for fairness by paying double time for all overtime. However, in the above example, that would be $40 an hour, better, but still a third less than your first 40 hour compensation. Negotiate!

Use a tool like the calculator found on PanTravelers to calculate total pay when you receive a complete offer. Don't take less than this number for overtime. Even at the same amount, you will be better off financially than working for a local agency.

Wow! Thanks NedRN! Very valuable info there! 

So, from what you're saying, I'm actually making less (as much as half less) when doing OT vs straight time?

And in regards to registry work, isn't it $500+ per shift? 

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TitaniumPlates has 15 years experience and specializes in ED.

106 Posts; 1,985 Profile Views

On 6/2/2019 at 8:30 AM, jjdd said:

Wow! Thanks NedRN! Very valuable info there! 

So, from what you're saying, I'm actually making less (as much as half less) when doing OT vs straight time?

And in regards to registry work, isn't it $500+ per shift? 

No. It's not. Again with anecdotal information.

Local hospitals in California where you want to work want you to do things like a full solid week of orientation in a classroom and then a couple of weeks of orientation to the unit where you will work. Prn or registry isn't like travel. They don't drop you into shifts and expect you to perform because  that is what travelers are for.

Prn rates for hospitals are much lower than the average hourly rate we make as a traveler because we have housing and M&IE included.

They also want someone who will be there for a longer period of time. If they hire you then train you to their unit they expect a return on their investment. Else they would just hire a traveler to fill those holes in the schedule.

I have heard this myth over and over about $500/ shift in California for a day's work. First, you are med surg. That alone will most likely be the factor that precludes you from getting anything like that offered. Second. You do realize that if the shift paid $500...you have 13% California income tax, FICA, and other taxes, right? They don't hand you five Benjamins and call you again when its convenient for your schedule.

You do realize that being a traveler you are scheduled by the facility you are contracted to. Right? You do understand that you have little to zero flexibility with your schedule as a traveler right? You do realize that most travel companies and hospitals will deny you a full week off to do orientation at some other hospital even if you could magically get hired and plan your orientation to where your negotiated week off lands? You do realize you have to be honest with the hospital and company that might be interested in you for registry or prn?

Right??

 

 

Edited by TitaniumPlates

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Pheebz777 has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, CVICU, E.R..

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I am working a travel assignment with Kaiser Fremont CA and applied with HealthTrust Workforce solutions as registry for a couple of HCA facilities here. The average take home pay is a little over $750 per shift. I will be only having a 6hr facility orientation then another 6 hrs on the unit before I start my own shifts.

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