What's the point of getting a BSN?

  1. Hi, the only reason I'm asking is because by mid next year, I will have completed a BA in another subject. I have recently gained an interest in nursing but I didn't want to abandon my BA that I've already put so much time and effort into. I was looking into some ASN programs, primarily for the fact that they tend to be a little cheaper. I considered a BSN program, but now I wonder why I should bother? After researching, I see that I can go from an ASN(With a BA) to an MSN(If I wanted to...). So can someone tell me why/if I should go for the BSN instead of the ASN? Oh and not that the money is sole deciding factor for my decision, I'm still curious: Even though I would already have a BA, do you think I'd still make less than someone with a BSN? IMO I don't see much difference in someone having a BSN and someone like myself who would have an ASN+BA...
  2. Visit nikkir386 profile page

    About nikkir386

    Joined: Jun '09; Posts: 7
    Student in College; from US

    42 Comments

  3. by   VidaUrbana
    I know for me A BSN, is
    really important to me...
    especially if you want to continue
    your education in Master level program
    or later even earn your DNP.
    It depends...
    I noticed most people who
    go for there ASN are older
    people who had a BA or BS in another field...
    and are just happy with an ASN...
    Nothing wrong with either degree,
    IMO..
  4. by   ChristineN
    Quote from nikkir386
    Hi, the only reason I'm asking is because by mid next year, I will have completed a BA in another subject. I have recently gained an interest in nursing but I didn't want to abandon my BA that I've already put so much time and effort into. I was looking into some ASN programs, primarily for the fact that they tend to be a little cheaper. I considered a BSN program, but now I wonder why I should bother? After researching, I see that I can go from an ASN(With a BA) to an MSN(If I wanted to...). So can someone tell me why/if I should go for the BSN instead of the ASN? Oh and not that the money is sole deciding factor for my decision, I'm still curious: Even though I would already have a BA, do you think I'd still make less than someone with a BSN? IMO I don't see much difference in someone having a BSN and someone like myself who would have an ASN+BA...
    Yes, even though you have a BA, you will make the same salry as an entry level nurse graduating from a diploma or associate RN program? Why? Because while your two year program may prepare you in areas of clinical skill and NCLEX preparedness, it will not prepare you in areas such as leadership, community nursing, and research skills. These are topics addressed in upper level BSN nursing classes.

    I'm not saying you should get a BSN. You need to weigh your options and see what you want your career path to be. It might be more efficient for you to do an RN-MSN if you have a desire to go to grad school.
  5. by   jgcadet
    Well with a BSN you would be in theory, a more skilled/competent nurse.
    Money wise I saw a user post here that the pay difference at his hospital was like ~20k. I don't think having a BA would have any effect on your pay. Besides during the time before you get master's don't you want to be making more..... Unless you want to go into a masters program with no clinical exp. Plus if you joined the armed forces they pack back student debts and your masters degree. However, they all only accept BSN's except the army reserves.
  6. by   swirlything
    Some studies have shown that BSN prepared nurses provide better outcomes for patients. Where I live, a BSN gets you $1 more per hour, where you live could be different (may even no extra money). A BA or BS in another field will NOT qualify you for that $1 extra... my friends with bachelor's in other fields but only an ADN in nursing make the same as those with no bachelor's degree.

    I personally would say to do the one that will get you to NCLEX the fastest, to start working. If that's an ADN program, then do a RN-BSN or RN-MSN bridge afterward.
  7. by   llg
    There is nothing wrong with the path that swirleything suggested above. Get the cheaper ADN and then add the BSN and/or MSN later, when your employer will help pay for it.

    However ... if you take that route, you need to understand that there will be some job opportunities denied to you if you only have the ADN. There are an increasing number of jobs that require a BSN or above. Your BA in another field will not necessarily substitue -- as that BA did not include the Bachelor's level nursing content.
  8. by   JBudd
    Most BSN programs will give you research, leadership and management, community or public health and possibly some broader experiences inhouse. This is a generalization! Some ADN programs hit more than others.

    But, in general, you need a BSN to be upwardly mobile in the nursing world, beyond the bedside or lower level management. As you pointed out, you can get into master's programs with the BA and an ADN; depends on where you want to go with your career.
  9. by   Daytonite
    What's the point of getting a BSN?
    • expand your nursing knowledge base
    • so you won't have to worry about going back to school when you hear the talk about how they are going to make a BSN mandatory to have an RN license
    • to have the opportunity to get management positions in nursing (if you want them)
    • to feel a sense of achievement and feel good about yourself
    • I worked in one large midwest teaching hospital that only hired BSN nurses and all others need not apply. That's how hoity-toity they were.
  10. by   DoGoodThenGo
    BSN as mandatory for entry into the profession and or holding a RN has been going on for over 40 years and it hasn't taken yet, and is never likely to any time soon. What has mainly happened is diploma schools have pretty much died out, and Associate programs have beefed themselves up to provide the sort of nurses hospitals want.

    IIRC, according to the lastest figures, over 50% of new graduates of United States nursing programs last year came from two and three year programs, a number that has remained quite stable over the years, though perhaps down from say the 1980's and before when a higher percentage of RNs would have come from diploma or associate programs.

    Quite honestly, and not trying to put down any particular group and or school, in order for there to be a mandatory BSN, the United States would need to educate more students coming out of high schools able to handle four year college/university course work, in particular when it comes to nursing, math and science. This so far has eluded the US educational system. When you consider it takes the average four year college student five or more years to graduate (leaving aside financial and personal matters), not everyone wishing to become a nurse has that kind of time.

    Hospitals are still the largest employers of nurses in the United States, thus have great power in terms of dictating what sort of nurse comes out of nursing programs. If they all wanted a BSN nurse, schools would have no other choice than to comply because students wouldn't bother with a program where they could not find work after graduation.
  11. by   tuttle13
    Where I am a BSN or a ADN is still a RN and they make the same $. The only difference is a BSN or higher can go into mgmt and that is where you make more $. I am going for my RN to MSN because I want to be the best nurse I can be and also have the option of going into mgmt or teaching once I get older and maybe want a way out of floor nursing.

    Since you already have (or will have) a BA there is no reason to go for a BSN. Once you complete your ASN you can take a short bridge course to BSN or go straight to MSN. Although a ASN RN can also go straight to MSN, but it just takes a little longer.

    There is nothing wrong with a ASN. The thought that it is "just a 2 year program" is incorrect. I had to take almost 2 years of pre and co-reqs BEFORE applying for the nursing program, and that was full time. It still takes about 4 years, but you probably have alot of the courses already from your BA. However you need BIO, A&P, chemistry, microbiology, psychology courses, math etc. which you may not have with your BA, so you may still need some pre-reqs before you can apply to a program.
  12. by   lilmama007
    Quote from ChristineN
    Yes, even though you have a BA, you will make the same salry as an entry level nurse graduating from a diploma or associate RN program? Why? Because while your two year program may prepare you in areas of clinical skill and NCLEX preparedness, it will not prepare you in areas such as leadership, community nursing, and research skills. These are topics addressed in upper level BSN nursing classes.

    I'm not saying you should get a BSN. You need to weigh your options and see what you want your career path to be. It might be more efficient for you to do an RN-MSN if you have a desire to go to grad school.
    No one can be PREPARED for leadership. Either you have it or you don't. Not all BSN's can lead. Sorry , it just doesn't work that way. i'm speaking from experience as a US Marine Corps veteran. Saw War 3 times and lead so well that not one of my Marines died. (Also I am female)
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Aug 3, '09 : Reason: PM to member
  13. by   ChristineN
    Quote from lilmama007
    No one can be PREPARED for leadership. Either you have it or you don't. Not all BSN's can lead. Sorry , it just doesn't work that way. i'm speaking from experience as a US Marine Corps veteran. Saw War 3 times and lead so well that not one of my Marines died. (Also I am female)
    Look, I am very aware that a class can't give you life skills. But I'm just trying to tell the OP that if she aspires for management roles in nursing, that is much more likely to happen if she at least has a BSN.
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Aug 3, '09 : Reason: pm to member
  14. by   lilmama007
    Quote from ChristineN
    Look,, I am very aware that a class can't give you life skills. But I'm just trying to tell the OP that if she aspires for management roles in nursing, that is much more likely to happen if she at least has a BSN.

    Of course having a BSN will automatically give you the management role. But a BSN will not give you those life skills that go along with with the management roll. You can't just say 'hey, I manage this floor' People are born leaders, that's not something you just obtain by having a degree. Don't get offended just telling the truth. It hurts I know. But you can't sugar coat stuff.
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Aug 3, '09 : Reason: pm to member

close