What's the point of getting a BSN? - page 3

Hi, the only reason I'm asking is because by mid next year, I will have completed a BA in another subject. I have recently gained an interest in nursing but I didn't want to abandon my BA that I've... Read More

  1. by   lilmama007
    Quote from ChristineN
    I think this has gotten out of hand enough. As far as nursing goes, you don't have much more experience than I do. You may be a veteran, and you may have done great things in the military, which is [b]wonderful[b/], and I am greatful for your service. However, when it comes it nursing, I think things need to be based more on actual nursing experience and education.

    You have your ADN I assume since you granduate from your BSN in Aug meaning, your program is 3-5 semesters and you probably only work weekends when there's no doctors around in PEDS? Seriously come on, asthma attacks? are you serious? I can name stuff you can't imagine. Come play in my world for 3 days and see how you feel about REAL NURSING
    Last edit by ElvishDNP on Aug 4, '09 : Reason: removing off-topic input
  2. by   ChristineN
    Quote from lilmama007
    You have your ADN I assume since you granduate from your BSN in Aug meaning, your program is 3-5 semesters and you probably only work weekends when there's no doctors around in PEDS? Seriously come on little girl, asthma attacks? are you serious? I can name stuff you can't imagine. Come play in my world for 3 days and see how you feel about REAL NURSING
    Wow. Just wow. Please don't go making assumptions about which you know nothing. I work 3 12 hr shifts a week while attending a BSN program full-time. I work day/nights weekend/weekday. I do it all. As for just asthma attacks, if that's all you think peds is, then you apparently have no idea what all we deal with. DKA's, terminally ill children, chronic illnesses, and more. Please. Don't treat me like just because I'm in school or I work in peds I'm not "good enough."
  3. by   lilmama007
    Quote from ChristineN
    Wow. Just wow. Please don't go making assumptions about which you know nothing. I work 3 12 hr shifts a week while attending a BSN program full-time. I work day/nights weekend/weekday. I do it all. As for just asthma attacks, if that's all you think peds is, then you apparently have no idea what all we deal with. DKA's, terminally ill children, chronic illnesses, and more. Please. Don't treat me like just because I'm in school or I work in peds I'm not "good enough."

    not that you're not "good enough" you haven't seen enough. DKA? seriously, that an everyday occurrence on a med surg floor, terminally ill? come on now, you've gotta do better than that. That sounds skate to me. BUT we are from two different nursing worlds. Those cases may sound complex on your side, but you seriously cant play with what i deal with
  4. by   Silverdragon102
    closing for staff review
  5. by   Silverdragon102
    reopening thread. can we please keep to the topic of the thread what's the point of getting a bsn? and any debates can we please keep it civil and polite as per terms of service
  6. by   LucasRN
    Hi everyone. I think the point of obtaining your BSN is in order to pursue supervisory or teaching positions which will enable you to continue to grow in your nursing profession and help new nurses as they come along. Regardless of how much Life experience you have, or how much emergent nursing you have under your belt, without that piece of paper you will always have a barrier to promotions within the nursing field. Good luck to all, and remember when you stop learning, you stop living.
  7. by   MiaNJ
    Quote from nikkir386
    Hi, the only reason I'm asking is because by mid next year, I will have completed a BA in another subject. I have recently gained an interest in nursing but I didn't want to abandon my BA that I've already put so much time and effort into. I was looking into some ASN programs, primarily for the fact that they tend to be a little cheaper. I considered a BSN program, but now I wonder why I should bother? After researching, I see that I can go from an ASN(With a BA) to an MSN(If I wanted to...). So can someone tell me why/if I should go for the BSN instead of the ASN? Oh and not that the money is sole deciding factor for my decision, I'm still curious: Even though I would already have a BA, do you think I'd still make less than someone with a BSN? IMO I don't see much difference in someone having a BSN and someone like myself who would have an ASN+BA...
    I got a BSN as a second degree, since I already had a BA in another field. When I was looking into programs, I did see that ASN programs were somewhat cheaper, BUT the vast majority had a long waiting list (some a few yrs), and they would take even longer than the accelerated BSN. The thing to keep in mind, that many of the 'general ed' courses that make the degree an 'Associates' college degree, you most likely already have taken as part of your general BA degree. Such as college level math, history, english, etc. etc. You may even have taken a higher level than some of the ones offered in the ASN program. So you probably won't have to repeat them. BUT most of these programs are structured in a traditional schedule, so even if you can skip those general courses and get credit, you will probably have to wait till the next semester to take the required courses for your nursing core classes.
    So, I figured I would take the 15-16 month accelerated nursing program and get the BSN, vs. 2yrs to get an ASN. I'm not going to get which would make a better nurse or leader, but the fact is that many hospitals in my area at least, do pay a bit more for the BSN, and some really prefer a BSN.
    So it just didn't make sense to get on a waiting list for an ASN program, where there were many general ed courses that I didn't have to take anyway.
    I think there are waiting lists for accelerated programs too, and you do need to take the prereqs. But for me, it was still easier and not much more expensive than the ASN programs. There are many accelerated second degree programs now.
  8. by   NeecyBSN_RN
    I decided to go to a BSN program (as opposed to the ASN program that is within comparable distance) b/c I am going to commission in the Army. It is required and a prerequisite for me to get my Master's degree so that I may progress in rank/career opportunites.Besides, the ROTC program I am in is paying for it! I assume most pursue this route for upward mobility/personal fulfillment, although there are often always exceptions to the rules !
  9. by   Tweety
    I was an ADN graduate at first. It was the only option for me at the time 18 years ago in the small town I was living.

    I got my BSN two years ago as an investment in my future as I age in nursing. I'm not sure I want to be running the unit when I'm in my late 50's and 60's. Around here, and particularly at the facility I've worked for 17 years, ADNs are denied certain job positions.

    Just recently I put my BSN to use and have a no-weekend, no-holiday BSN-required job in the admit-transfer center and am away of the stress and physical demands floor nursing.

    We all say "I'll be a floor nurse forever because I love patients. I could never be away from the patients. I don't want to be a manager....I'm already on my 2nd career, I just want to take care of patients until I retire.".....Then 15 or 20 years go by, the back hurts, the knees age, we're 50 plus years old, and our perspectives and priorities change. I always advice people to get the BSN out of the way, you might just find you need it one day.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 4, '09
  10. by   Alexsys
    I started off with an ADN and went straight to my BSN (I had the time) I would not be a SRNA now if I didnt get that far. The BSN is for people that want to pursue a degree beyond undergraduate school. If a person is OK with an ADN, so be it. Nothing wrong with that. An ADN got my bills paid.

    I also was an OFFICER that lead and saw war in the military, but that only makes my experience different, not better than anyone else
  11. by   j621d
    Quote from Tweety
    We all say "I'll be a floor nurse forever because I love patients. I could never be away from the patients. I don't want to be a manager....I'm already on my 2nd career, I just want to take care of patients until I retire.".....Then 15 or 20 years go by, the back hurts, the knees age, we're 50 plus years old, and our perspectives and priorities change. I always advice people to get the BSN out of the way, you might just find you need it one day.
    I obtained a bachelor's in business before I realized I should have gone into nursing. I applied to both an ADN program and BSN (was accepted into both). I opted for the BSN route, as it would take me the same amount of time (the BSN is a 2+2 program). Having the BSN has allowed more opportunities for me (and it didn't hurt to have the business degree). BSN seems to have a broader view on issues, as they have been exposed to a wider variety of general education subjects. That is a very sweeping statement, and only a reflection of my point of view.

    Bottom line, if you can get the BSN, do it. It won't hurt to have more education. When I graduated over 20 years ago I thought my schooling was over. Currently I am in a Master's program in nursing. I would never have dreamed it 20+ years ago. Because I did have the BSN, I was able to jump right into the program! I might not have gone back otherwise.
  12. by   Age1
    I am actually getting my ADN, but I have plans for advancing my degree to the masters level. So the BSN sounds pretty nice. I would actually feel a little more fulfilled by getting a bachelors degree since I don't have one already.
  13. by   Kora0880
    My concern would be MSN RN with no clinical experience.....typically MSN are looked upon as leadership role material...well with no experience would you want to be put in that situation? I think there could be potential conflict with staff there.....I knew some students who were claiming they are going straigh for MGR position after MSN....and how effective will they be in this role (if they get it in the first place) without any practical understanding? Just another MGR who's clueless about the nature of what nursing is....tooo many hospitals are run that way today!

    Personally I woud pursue MSN after few years of practice behind my belt......Best of luck!

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