Still don't get the BSN ADN thing...

  1. One of biggest mysteries I had after I started nursing was: BSN increases patient outcome. What? Just because I shoved up few more dollars into greedy university's rear, that makes me a better student? I used to think that I must be a badass and better than ADN because they are from community college (wooo), but find out, they take exactly same classes as we do, take the same test, and tadaa~ does exactly same things as we do; I met many ADNs and few of them being charge nurses, I didn't even know they were ADNs until they brought up the "I need to/am working on BSN right now." My unit auditor is ADN, and she is great! All BSN serves to me personally, is that it takes less time for me to achieve MSN, and that is it.

    I have heard of the studies that show that BSN hospitals improves patient outcomes and resuscitation outcomes compared to ADN hospitals, etc but I can't help but doubt that. I'm a BSN but my degree does not upgrade my brain magically to remember the ACLS algorithm or to push epi better than the ADNs; it's really all experience and that's it. Is it a money thing for universities? Or was I lucky enough to work with only cool ADNs. Maybe someone has good explanation to this?
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    About tarotale

    Joined: Apr '11; Posts: 455; Likes: 464
    from US
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    80 Comments

  3. by   cracklingkraken
    BSN is a 4 year degree, rather than an ADN which is a 2 year degree (not including the prereqs). The extra time it takes is considered a more advanced education, even though it mostly consists with random classes, such as liberal arts classes. I think it's an ego thing, too. Such as "Oh you only have a Masters? That's cute, I have a Ph. D." Oh, I guess that goes along with the advanced education.I am perfectly okay with graduating from an ADN program. Like you said, we pass they same exam to obtain our license anyways in the end.
  4. by   Esme12
    A study can be manipulated to show whatever the author wants it to show...IMHO.

    Mostly it is personal agenda of the ANA
  5. by   BSNbeauty
    I'm 5 classes away from graduating with my BSN. I personally feel that experience promotes better patient outcomes. I can hope that a BSN will help enhance my knowledge at the bedside. I don't feel a BSN make a better nurse. It depends on that individual nurse.
  6. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from tarotale
    I have heard of the studies that show that BSN hospitals improves patient outcomes and resuscitation outcomes compared to ADN hospitals, etc but I can't help but doubt that.

    Maybe someone has good explanation to this?
    Just because you may "doubt" it doesn't mean it isn't true. That's why studies are done in the first place, because gut feeling isn't the way healthcare should be practiced.

    It's the scientific process.
  7. by   klone
    Quote from cracklingkraken
    even though it mostly consists with random classes, such as liberal arts classes.
    No. I think I had TWO liberal arts classes that I had to take as part of the BSN. All the rest were BSN-related.
  8. by   HarryTheCat
    Quote from prnqday
    I'm 5 classes away from graduating with my BSN. I personally feel that experience promotes better patient outcomes. I can hope that a BSN will help enhance my knowledge at the bedside. I don't feel a BSN make a better nurse. It depends on that individual nurse.
    The difference isn't usually apparent at the beside, where the psychomotor tasks of nursing are performed. What the BSN does add to the curriculum is found in subjects such as Theory, Research, Leadership, Informatics and other areas of knowledge that add both depth and breadth to the educational experience. In practice, these course promote a culture of critical thinking and a better understanding of the application of evidence based practice. Is a BSN going to make you a better bedside nurse? Probably not. But it does give you more employment options and a higher career ceiling.
  9. by   nurseprnRN
    Quote from HarryTheCat
    The difference isn't usually apparent at the beside, where the psychomotor tasks of nursing are performed.
    Untrue, and assumes that the only knowledge that matters in bedside care is related to performing psychomotor tasks. Heaven help us if that's true .... although I did see evidence of that a lot in many ADN grads.
  10. by   ceebeejay
    These studies were done primarily when ADN's with years of experience in the field started going back to get their BSN's in order to move into management positions. I believe sincerely, that when an ADN with years of practical experience goes back to school, he/she will come back to the profession with more innovation and creativity and perhaps more zeal for the the profession. However, I believe that in the years to come when these studies are repeated, they will find that having a BSN outright does not improve outcomes. I am a novice ADN practicing, and working toward my BSN. I can tell you that I have not learned ANYTHING new yet. Just more about what I already learned in my most excellent education as an ADN. It is nice to have the review, but to pay for it and be denied chances at employment for it, no.
  11. by   Carrie RN
    I say this proudly a lot on here, "I am an ADN, my nephew is a BSN, my aunt is a diploma nurse, she can wipe the floor with the both of us ANY day of the week."
  12. by   akulahawkRN
    Quote from Esme12
    A study can be manipulated to show whatever the author wants it to show...IMHO.

    Mostly it is personal agenda of the ANA
    Not just your opinion. One of my favorite courses was a stats course... Interestingly enough, once you know how to work with the data, you also learn just how true this quote is: "There are lies, damn lies, and statistics."
  13. by   akulahawkRN
    I have a Bachelors Degree in an allied healthcare field. One of the things that separates the ADN from the BSN is the Upper Division Gen Ed stuff which broadens your horizons a bit. You do get quite a bit of "higher level" coursework but for nursing, much of the stuff taught to ADNs is the same as what's taught to BSNs. There will be some additional public health and nursing management theory that's taught to BSNs that the ADNs don't get and that's about an additional semester's worth of classes when combined with the UDGE stuff. If you were to really break it down, I'm also about 6 classes away from a 2nd Bachelors...
  14. by   Nonyvole
    I've seen good RNs from ADN programs and I've seen bad RNs from ADN programs. Same with BSN programs.

    However, I must say that my opinion is that it's up to the students to make the most of their education. Educators present the information, but they can't make the students learn, they can't make the students develop critical thinking abilities. And then once they've passed the NCLEX, it's up to the individual to maintain their competency. Nobody should have things spoon-fed to them if they're able to feed themselves.

    I will say this. In my experience, the ADN students that I've met have seemed angry. Why, I don't know. Confusion? Discomfort? Who knows, they never said and I never asked. My personal theory is that they had applied to BSN programs and were rejected, or were scared of rejection and the ADN programs they attended accepted almost anybody. (I will admit, rather selfishly, that I'm glad that it wasn't my license on the line with them. There were a couple that said they were CNAs and worked as CNAs and yet...couldn't do basic skills like check a pulse. Others were less than polite to the staff. Still others tried to do things that they didn't know how to do. But that comes down to the individual, and not the program.)

    I do know that my BSN program had more clinical hours than the ADN programs. But at the same time, it also had more clinical hours than other BSN programs in my area.

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