Rejected from BSN accelerated program

  1. Hi ...I found out I was rejected from the BSN Accelerated Program due to a low gpa...2.7 and 3.0 is needed. To my surprise, I didn't know it is added culumative. I didn't do so great in college in my 20's but when I went for my BA, I did outstanding. Help...need advice on what to do to get accepted in BSN program.
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    About s14emmy

    Joined: Jun '14; Posts: 16; Likes: 1

    16 Comments

  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    how many other schools did you apply to? ABSN programs are very competitive, from what I hear.
  4. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from s14emmy
    Hi ...I found out I was rejected from the BSN Accelerated Program due to a low gpa...2.7 and 3.0 is needed. To my surprise, I didn't know it is added culumative. I didn't do so great in college in my 20's but when I went for my BA, I did outstanding. Help...need advice on what to do to get accepted in BSN program.
    You might want to check with the program(s) you're specifically interested in. Every school has different admission criteria.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Earning 'A' grades in pertinent free elective coursework (e.g., genetics, abnormal psychology, elementary statistics, pathophysiology, medical terminology, technical writing) could help boost your GPA since this particular school uses a cumulative GPA.
  6. by   MantaRay15
    You need to look for a program that has a minimum gpa requirement based on the most recent academic performance. Some schools look at the last 60 semester units/90 quarter units. My situation is exactly the same as yours.
  7. by   elkpark
    Be aware, though, that many nursing programs are so competitive that the minimum published GPA isn't enough to get you accepted. Lots of programs say that the minimum GPA to apply is 3.0, but that doesn't mean anyone with a 3.0 GPA is actually getting accepted into the program, because they are swamped with applicants with 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 4.0 GPAs. At the last program in which I taught, a state uni program that was respectable but nothing special, all the literature said that the minimum GPA to apply was 2.75, but the reality was that no one with less than a 3.7 got in. The program administration was v. proud of this, and bragged about it all the time. There were so many more applicants than we could possibly accept with GPAs of 3.7 or higher that people with the lower GPAs never even got seriously considered. Lots of nursing programs are in that situation, esp. the accelerated programs.
  8. by   s14emmy
    Adelphi, Stony brook, Wagner....al the same and very competitive. I was also told it would take years to build up my gpa. I did find St.Vincents AND program and suits my needs. I am also looking to begin with and LPN program.
  9. by   s14emmy
    Thank you. So basically just take more classess to boost up my gpa?
  10. by   s14emmy
    Wow..thank you for this info!
  11. by   s14emmy
    Any schools you know to share that do this. The ones I checked don't apply to this.
  12. by   StudentNurseTamika
    Instead of looking into LPN programs you can research ADN programs. I was a BSN student a little over 10 years ago and unfortunately failed out of the program with 1 more year to go. I still graduated on time with a bachelors in something else. My GPA is about 2.7. Fast forward I decided I want to go back to school for nursing because I believe it is something I am meant to do. I am now starting an ADN program at Rockland Community College and hopefully move on to BSN after I complete the program. Not sure where in NY you are located but look into community colleges
  13. by   s14emmy
    I looked into Nassau Community college...very competitive. I am still going to go on the list though. Why did you fail ?meaning what was it that made you fail.
  14. by   RiaC
    ABSN can be very competitive. I graduate from my BA program in my early 20s with a 2.7 gpa. When I decided that I wanted to pursue nursing, I actually went back from my ASN (associate's degree in nursing). I did part-time and worked full-time because my job essentially covered the tuition for that degree. After I obtained my RN license, I went back for my RN to BSN (which was also covered). It is a longer route to the BSN, but if you're not in a hurry and if you really want to pursue nursing, it is an alternative route.

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