Average Salary for ADN vs BSN - page 2

I know this will vary greatly by region, but what is the average pay for an entry-level nurse (right out of school) with an Associates in Nursing versus a Bachelors in Nursing? Has anyone found that... Read More

  1. by   laurentrilli
    Sugarbush-I'm sure that you are correct. Handing out titles such as Dr. to everyone is meaningless; ask the pharmacy profession; did anything change when they went to the all PharmD degree many years ago? Nope, it just meant that pharmacy school got one year longer. Most pharmacists still do the same jobs. CRNA's are on track to be a doctorate program; nothing will change....except the schools will make more money. I'll eat my hat is an anesthesiologist (MD) ever addresses a CRNA (nurse) as doctor and considers them to be a collegue rather than a "worker".
  2. by   LETRN
    There is a $0.50 difference in pay for a BSN prepared nurse in the hospital where I currently work as a tech. I graduate with my BSN in May, and while I was initially annoyed because of the pay difference and the lack of any differentiation between ADN and BSN nurses, I am glad I chose the path I have. Many people critique the BSN program because it is heavy on theory, but my program gives seniors 300 clinical hours on a med-surg floor with an RN preceptor. This has given me invaluable experience that ADN/ASN nurses in my area do not get, and hopefully will give me an edge in a month or so.
  3. by   aspiring_nursing
    Can anybody help me with this question? I will be graduating with a BA in May. I have been applying to ABSN programs but I am scared I may not get it. I have been thinking about the nursing program at my local community college. When I graduate from the community college, since I will already have a bachelors in another field, will I be considered to have a BSN or an associates in nursing? What does ADN mean? Associates? Also where can I find online details about certain programs and schools...Like how many graduates get jobs, where?, and after how long...Rate of passing the nclex...and so on..anyone know... I dont know who to speak to of such things. Since I am currently going to an IVY league school my mother will freak out if I tell her I am going to a community college. I just want to learn, pass the nclex and be a good nurse. Any suggestions? How can I find out if the school will prepare me, and what kind of degree I will have once I graduate from a community college while already having a BA. thanks for your help!
  4. by   Nurse Shannon
    With that route you will graduate with an ADN. A BSN only applies if you obtained a Bachelors of Science in nursing. I just graduated from an ABSN program. It worked really well for most of my classmates (I had a BA before hand), and what was tough was our community colleges were so impacted in their ADN programs, that they were on a lottery system. So if you took all your pre-reqs, worked your tail off and got all A's, you had the same chance to get in as the same person that copied off of you in micro, and slacked off in anatomy. They only had to meet the minimum C requirement. So that was a major reason that I, along with many of my classmates, chose the ABSN program, over the 2 year. yes it was more expensive, and yes, many of us are having a hard time finding work, but we were constantly challenged and taught to think outside the box. The whole lottery system really put me off of the ADN thing all together. However, if you want to be a nurse bad enough, just know that there are many ways to get where you want to be, and your mom will simply have to understand that.
  5. by   KClifton
    The school that I will be applying for when I go to get my ADN does not do the lottery thing. Applicants get points for test scores and for GPA and what-not and the highest ranking are the ones who get in.
  6. by   Gauge
    There is a 0.30 difference for bsn and 0.75 for your msn.
  7. by   SWS RN
    In South Florida, the pay for ADN and BSN is the same. The rate goes up with years of experience. I had a Bachelors Degree and Masters Degree in Health Administration before I went to nursing school. I went for the ADN-it was faster and had more clinical. I have been able to work as Supervisor and Director of Nursing using both. I was also accepted into an ARNP program as it is a ASN to MSN program. So I don't think the BSN is necessary.
    s
  8. by   dj4kids
    I have an ADN the area where I live the pay is the same for entry level. Having a BSN is supposedly makes you better candidate for management. I am looking into earning a BSN on line but do not want a degree from Mickey Mouse U, does any one know an online program that employers would be impressed with. There are so many to choose from it will make your head spin
  9. by   KClifton
    Quote from SWS RN
    In South Florida, the pay for ADN and BSN is the same. The rate goes up with years of experience. I had a Bachelors Degree and Masters Degree in Health Administration before I went to nursing school. I went for the ADN-it was faster and had more clinical. I have been able to work as Supervisor and Director of Nursing using both. I was also accepted into an ARNP program as it is a ASN to MSN program. So I don't think the BSN is necessary.
    s

    Most of the ADN/MSN prorgrams that I have look into either award you the BSN halfway through the program or award both the BSN and MSN at the end.
  10. by   peaceofmind8
    What about starting as an MSN? I'm not really wondering abou the pay difference but whether there would be less of a tendency to hire a new grad MSN rather than a BSN or ADN, all salaries being equal? With so many hiring freezes in my area, I have been counseled to just go for the MSN (ME-CLN) and acquire the Master's while the economy warms back up. Will this work against me in the hiring process even if it opens doors in the long run?
  11. by   SingDanceRunLife
    What I've been hearing from my friends who are seniors is that experience matters much more than your degree right now in terms of getting hired.

    This tells me that I better work as a student nurse aide throughout my time in NS, and work part time my senior year so I have good experience behind me!
  12. by   SunshineRN79
    [font=sans-serif]thank you for taking the time to email me and share your thoughts on the nursing shortage. you are very well spoken and a strong advocate for patients and the nursing profession. our healthcare system is indeed broken, and serious steps must be taken to ensure that patients receive high quality, safe care. the research shows that nurses with high patient loads are spread too thin, and patients suffer the consequences. fortunately, the magnet hospital concept is catching on and more facilities are moving to limit nurse to patient ratios and enhance the nurse work environment. the current trend in not hiring new graduates in some parts of the country is a direct result of the recession which has impacted all sectors of the economy. this disruption in usual trends has resulted since nurses planning to retire are holding on to their jobs, some part-time nurses are now working full-time to make ends meet, and hospitals have instituted hiring freezes to help keep costs down. as the economy recovers, we do expect old patterns to re-emerge and many rn positions are expected to open soon. the rn workforce is still aging rapidly and a large wave of retirements is expected over the next 10 years. i know that some parts of the country are still experiencing shortages (like texas and missouri) and heard last week that new nursing grads can earn annual salaries of up to $80,000 if they opt to work in the delta region of mississippi. below are some links to jobs site that you may find useful. i do wish to offer some additional information about baccalaureate prepared and associate degree nurses. you should be proud of your magna cum laude standing and i know you worked hard to achieve this. but associate degree programs are not accelerated versions of baccalaureate programs, and bsn graduate do receive more in-depth and rigorous coursework in the sciences, research, community health, and management. the reason why magnet hospitals look to hire bsn grads is because they recognize a difference in these nurses, and the research is clear that patient outcomes are better when care is provided by bsn nurses. you are clearly a bright, committed nurse and i encourage you to continue your formal education (up through doctoral preparation!) because nursing needs strong leaders like you guiding the profession. best of luck to you in your job search. robert
    [font=sans-serif]chief communications officer
    american association of colleges of nursing
    one dupont circle, suite 530
    washington, d.c. 20036
    202-463-6930, x231

    [font=sans-serif]
  13. by   kidsnstudyn
    Quote from dj4kids
    I have an ADN the area where I live the pay is the same for entry level. Having a BSN is supposedly makes you better candidate for management. I am looking into earning a BSN on line but do not want a degree from Mickey Mouse U, does any one know an online program that employers would be impressed with. There are so many to choose from it will make your head spin
    I live in Ohio and I know a couple ADN's that are going online to Ohio University and Indiana Wesleyan University for their BSN they are both online programs, I know someone who's also doing the same thing with Ohio State University, but I'm not sure if it's in-class or online. Any of those schools, I think, would be a respectable place to have a degree from.

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