advantages of BSN vs. ADN - page 4

Hi, considering that I am very new to all of this, I would appreciate any imput from you all. I am just entering my first semester of an ADN program, and would like to go on to the RN to BSN... Read More

  1. by   rn/writer
    I graduated from an excellent ADN program ten years ago. I was 39 and had six kids, ranging in age from 9 to 21. Had I been ten or fifteen years younger (with fewer children), I might have gone after the BSN, but now--whew!--I have too much else going on to even think about going back to school. I do like to study and pursue CEUs whenever I can. I read a ton on my own and tend to go through short-term obsessions till I've acquired a working knowledge regarding a particular subject. Then I move on to the next one. This system seems to be working pretty well. I can't think of a time when the lack of a BSN degree has held me back.

    That said, a BSN is the stepping-stone to any kind of federal public health opportunity (state requirements vary). You also need a BSN if you are considering advanced practice options or upper-level management.

    The really great thing is, you don't have to decide now and that is one of the most amazing aspects of a nursing career. What other professional field lets you start working with as little as one year of schooling and then allows you to progress as far and as fast as time, finances, and personal choices permit? When I was first thinking about going back to school, I briefly considered social work or counselling. After I found out that a masters degree in either of those was considered just barely a notch above entry level (with crummy pay to match), I screamed and ran headlong into the ADN program and I've never looked back.

    Cheers,
    Miranda
  2. by   katiebugg
    Quote from rn/writer
    I graduated from an excellent ADN program ten years ago. I was 39 and had six kids, ranging in age from 9 to 21. Had I been ten or fifteen years younger (with fewer children), I might have gone after the BSN, but now--whew!--I have too much else going on to even think about going back to school. I do like to study and pursue CEUs whenever I can. I read a ton on my own and tend to go through short-term obsessions till I've acquired a working knowledge regarding a particular subject. Then I move on to the next one. This system seems to be working pretty well. I can't think of a time when the lack of a BSN degree has held me back.

    That said, a BSN is the stepping-stone to any kind of federal public health opportunity (state requirements vary). You also need a BSN if you are considering advanced practice options or upper-level management.

    The really great thing is, you don't have to decide now and that is one of the most amazing aspects of a nursing career. What other professional field lets you start working with as little as one year of schooling and then allows you to progress as far and as fast as time, finances, and personal choices permit? When I was first thinking about going back to school, I briefly considered social work or counselling. After I found out that a masters degree in either of those was considered just barely a notch above entry level (with crummy pay to match), I screamed and ran headlong into the ADN program and I've never looked back.

    Cheers,
    Miranda
    Thank you rn/writer,
    I am 41 with 5 boys, ages 10-22. I just got accepted into an ADN program which I begin next month. I have found all of this imput very valuable. I will wait and see how I feel about the BSN thing later...right now, I need to concentrate on the ADN...thanks for the encouragement for all of you.
    katie
  3. by   Tweety
    Quote from katiebugg
    Thank you rn/writer,
    I am 41 with 5 boys, ages 10-22. I just got accepted into an ADN program which I begin next month. I have found all of this imput very valuable. I will wait and see how I feel about the BSN thing later...right now, I need to concentrate on the ADN...thanks for the encouragement for all of you.
    katie
    Good luck to you. As you can see there's a wide ranging opinion on both sides. I think this thread was quite mild compared to some others I've seen in the past.

    I did the ADN because it was cheap and it was accessible (the BSN program being 2 hours away). 15 years later I'm doing the BSN. Always keep your mind open, depending on your own personal goals for yourself.
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 31, '04
  4. by   rn/writer
    Quote from zenman
    Ok, I have a solution. Let nurses who only want to take nursing courses do so. Leave out all the useless crap. Let's do the same for engineers, lawyers, teachers, etc.. We can call you "trade school graduates." The ones who value and can even comprehend the value of education...we'll call you...let's see..."professionals."
    Wow. I hope this is just good-natured ribbing masqerading as educational snobbery.

    Being professional is an attitude and a code of conduct, not the unearned province of those with a particular title.

    ADNs take a number of psych courses, sociology, economics, and a host of other non-nursing courses in addition to the hard core science and nursing pre-reqs. When I graduated in '94, we ADNs had more clinical experience than our BSN counterparts but we didn't hold that against them. We also had teeny tiny student loans, comparatively speaking. (A lot of sour grapes grew out of that harsh reality.)

    One more thing--the correct terminology is community college.

    (In plaintive Rodney King tone) "Can't we all just get along?"

    Miranda F.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Dec 31, '04
  5. by   zenman
    Quote from rn/writer
    Wow. I hope this is just good-natured ribbing masqerading as educational snobbery.

    Being professional is an attitude and a code of conduct, not the unearned province of those with a particular title.

    ADNs take a number of psych courses, sociology, economics, and a host of other non-nursing courses in addition to the hard core science and nursing pre-reqs.
    Miranda F.
    I'm not talking about ADN vs BSN. Just giving those that can't figure out the value of non-nursing courses a "Dr. Phil" kick in the butt! But, seeing the quality of any graduate now makes me too scared to get sick! Do you know that universities used to NOT have remedial courses to teach what high school was supposed to teach.
  6. by   Justmeandmycat
    Quote from tmiller027
    According to my chemistry professor, ADNs are more likely to kill a patient than BSNs...so I guess my patients are in BIG trouble :chuckle
    LPN, ADN, BSN, it doesn't matter. A student is a student and there will be days at clinical when you will be happy to get home and know that you didn't kill the patient OR the instructor. :hatparty:
  7. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from zenman
    I'm not talking about ADN vs BSN. Just giving those that can't figure out the value of non-nursing courses a "Dr. Phil" kick in the butt! But, seeing the quality of any graduate now makes me too scared to get sick! Do you know that universities used to NOT have remedial courses to teach what high school was supposed to teach.

    Apparently you liked school. Obviously many do not. That doesn't make them uneducated, and I think that is extremely rude of you to say. Your opinions matter, but not your name calling. Just because one doesn't want to take non-nursing courses doesn't mean he or she is trash. I'm just offended by your comment.

    Filling the pockets of colleges does not make one professional. You can't use what you learned in history class to save a pt.'s life, and unless you teach history, or go to trial against it , then why should you have to learn it after learning it through out your life in grade school, and high school????

    Also, my mother is one of a very few females buyers in a big international helicopter company. She did not graduate from college, in fact only was able to take one class. However, she has been with this company for 20 (?) years, and she is the only buyer without a college education. Do you think because she is uneducated she is incompetent to do her job? Obviously she is very competent! Does that make her not a professional? Is she the only nonprofessional in the professional dept. because she doesn't have her BSN degree? I think not!


    People like you that try to belittle others are the reason we all can't get along and act like adults. You are not better than anyone else ADN or BSN!

    Oh, BTW...I've never even seen "Dr. Phil". :angryfire
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jan 1, '05
  8. by   hospitalstaph
    Hi all,

    This thread really has me thinking. I am currently going for my ADN and plan to finish my BSN after I start working. I had previously thought that going on for the BSN is an option that I may not take since what I really want is to work with the patients and not work in managment.

    Now I am alittle worried. I am finding myself more and more worried that *not* gettting a BSN is not an option. And I do not mean that I could not find a job and make great money. But I do not want to be involved in these types of debates at work or have my abilities questioned by a co-worker. Is this happening in the real world out there or only here in the faceless nameless safety of the message boards?

    I was recently shocked that a college recruiter (from a BSN university) told me that ADN's kill more people. I hope that this is not being taught to their current students! I would hate to work with one of their grads and have them think that I am uneducated and a danger to patients. I hear nursing friends in my area tell me over and over again that if you want to work bedside it doesn't matter but then I see these heated posts and wonder, "Do I need a BSN to be accepted by co-workers?"

    Maybe the study should have been "How obtaining a BSN creates harmony at the nurses station":chuckle

    Tracy
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    How does anyone here feel about a person getting her ADN and then going for a different bachelors/master's degree, such as say, human resources or wholistic programs such as Clayton College studies? These I find MUCH more "up my alley" and suited to my ever-changing goals as an RN. Is that (pursuing alternate paths of study) any less to be recognized as valuable education? Because the BSN programs I have run into (RN-BSN) do not at all serve my needs or desires for further education and future goals. I do not wish to be "indoctrinated" as I have experienced ----yes we got speeches that the "only professional RN's have a BSN" from several professors, and to me, it's a horrendous turn-off. The only classes I see helping me may be nursing research and stats....the rest, I cannot see doing a thing to help.

    If that is "uneducated ignorance" , so you call---- it I see differently. I call it thinking my options thoroughly and critically and putting money where it's needed and will do the most for me. I just wish there were alternatives to pursuing higher education besides BSN to forge a path beyond bedside nursing. I can't find a program that I like, frankly. I wish to pursue another related discipline to couple w/my ADN. Is that so wrong? :imbar
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 31, '04
  10. by   Antikigirl
    Smiling blue eyes..that is my deal on the nose! I got my ADN because frankly I will be honest..I got Granted through it! I knew it would be a fairly secure job with more opportunities than say...a retail manager which I was going down the path to being. I was a single parent, and I knew..I better do something more secure! Some people say "well you did it just for the money then" and I would reply "have you gone to RN school? If it was just for the money I would have quit the stress three months in and rethought it!!!!!!".

    I chose to get that ADN later on really...I had the Grants, but still knew if I didn't like what I was doing...I either could quit and give that Grant to someone else that really wanted it or go on with my ADN and have the liberty of the nursing career to change into other fields! I chose the latter obviously, and still am thinking of what I wish to do..including going into other fields! My world, despite some money and time difficulties is wide open to me..why not explore, whether I choose nursing or another field...I need to find my niche and be happy, that to me is worth any amount of time and stress and money!

    And RN, whether BSN or ADN is an RN...just a different way and time to get there to me! Yes a BSN can open more opportunites, but you can get that after the ADN if you so choose and get some experience under your belt...to test it out so to speak! No other job I know of can you do that! (another reason I stuck with nursing!!!). The thing to remember is that the RN doesn't have to run your life...you can get out and change and never feel bad about the choice! If nursing isn't your thing after your RN title has been achieved...or your situation has changed...there is NO SHAME in leaving nursing if you feel you need to! Something many people just don't understand..they just think "oh...they didn't have the 'stuff' to be a nurse so they failed". Failed, no failing is sticking to nursing and not liking it and making yourself, patients, family, and fellow staff miserable for it..now that is failing, not leaving because it wasn't right for you...

    So far for me, and the opporunities I have been given in an area of the country with NO lack of nurses...I feel nursing may not be my thing right now. I am not being treated as a professional (nor are the BSN's I work with...we never had a probelm with the ADN or BSN thing in my facilty..we are all RN's and we get abused the same! LOL!), nor even a human being...just a signature on paperwork that they need to pass a state audit!!! Took me 6 months of searching to find this job...so it isn't like changing nursing facilities is easy around here. I am really thinking due to my environment, Nursing right now was not a solid choice as I once thought...so I may just go into another totally different part of Medical (I would like to stick with medical because I have done so very well) or leave it all together.

    BUt the nicest thing..I am a RN, I made it, I achieved my goal...and now regardless of if I go on to my BSN, or stick with the ADN or none of it at all..I did what I set out to do...and it was all my doing and choice! And I don't regret any of it, and changed many lifes for the better along the way..now that is a major sucess I never knew I could ever do!

    Rely on the flexibility of nursing, that is a very huge strong suit! But always be open to new opportunities for self fulfillment in other fields too...you just never know what life has in store for you in the future!
  11. by   mitchsmom
    smilingblueeyes, I think that's a great idea if a degree besides BSN would work better for your goals. Why not? (BTW, I have nursing research next semester and I'm absolutely dreading it! LOL)

    nursbee04, just FYI, I wasn't defending the article, just suggesting that that may be where some of those comments are coming from. As a matter of fact, the link had a lengthy critique of the study and discussion of it.

    I respect all the nurses out there working hard and doing a good job, no matter what initials... at the same time I still say always go for the highest education you are able to do. No one can take it away and you won't regret it, it can only help you.
  12. by   jeepgirl
    Quote from mitchsmom
    Actually, the guy may have seen this:

    Study: Nurses' Education Affects Death Rates
    https://allnurses.com/forums/showthr...threadid=87225
    i actually did a breakdown of this article and study for my BSN program - my research and theory class. The study was SOOO flawed that I cannot believe it was ever published. The person who designed and coordinated carrying out the whole thing has been pretty much torn to pieces. Rightfully so. The whole thing was slanted from the start (in other words, biased).
    Negative propaganda that only hurts our profession. Makes me sick to my stomach!
  13. by   Reddy,RN
    My thanks to katiebugg for the question and SmilingBlueEyes for the threads back on page 1. Reading all this feels like a seminar.

    I start a nursing program next month and this feels like time well-spent on a really valuable prerequisite. I learned a lot. Thanks again.

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