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"Fired for NO Reason"

Professionalism   (130,485 Views 539 Comments)
by Ruby Vee Ruby Vee, BSN (Member) Nurse Verified

Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 65 Articles; 170,109 Visitors; 13,914 Posts

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You are reading page 45 of "Fired for NO Reason". If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

BabyLady is a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU, Post-partum.

14,645 Visitors; 2,300 Posts

Amen!

I was in my late 30's when I changed careers and started nursing and I went into nursing with an open mind. I wanted to learn and took total responsibility for any and all mistakes and constantly changed my practice so I would not repeat them. I made a major medication error (I was always the one bragging too that it would never happen to me) because ONE time I got into a hurry and decided to skip a check...and it came back to bite me in the rear...I was very, very forutunate that I had a very understanding boss and that even though the error, to me, was major, in the end had no harm, not even temporary, to the patient. But to me, I saw it as a major lesson and I was VERY lucky...had it been a different error, it could have turned out quite differently.

However, I was hired at the same time with one young girl...she never had another job other than nursing and was what you would call a "degree snob"...I am all for a BSN and I am working on one myself, but she came into the profession with a high and mighty attitude that she was somehow better because she already had one.

She, to me, is the scariest type of new graduate because she doesn't know her own limitations. She will take on an assignment that is WAY beyond her skill level because she thinks, "They wouldn't have assigned me the patient if they didn't think I could take it."...well more than once, she has about darn near killed more than one because she didn't have a full appreciation for what all her patient needed...or when to ask for help!

She is very arrogant and it is just a matter of time before it will come back to haunt her...just working in the same room with her is irritating as heck because she constanty critiques everything everyone is doing...even senior nurses who have been doing this longer than she has been alive.

Needless to say, she hasn't exactly won a popularity contest.

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RetRN77 has 20 years experience and specializes in Labor/Delivery, Pediatrics, Peds ER.

4,771 Visitors; 153 Posts

Sure, but training is required for every skilled or task oriented job out there.

Nursing jobs are not exclusive or special in any way. This industry just somehow gets away with this myth of undue hardship as if it were to say, "Oh! Do you know the suffering the Corporation has taken on your employ as a new nurse? You need to forever be grateful for the opportunity afforded you, as otherwise you'd be on the streets" - attitude. Reminds me of Oliver Twist.

As a second career nurse, I don't fall for all the dust-up. I find it hilarious. Why on earth do so many fall for this line? I'll never know. I guess it could be that healthcare is a "closed" environment, if you have no awareness of the outside, you are satisfied with whatever you are fed.

I worked for a pediatrician about 30 years ago who had trained his receptionist of 20 years right out of high school. He was very precise about everything done in the office, included the phrasing used with patients on the phone and the questions he wanted asked. He'd painstakingly trained her to the nth degree, and his attitude was that properly trained nurses were a dime a dozen, but duplicating what he'd accomplished with his receptionist was not something he wanted to have to repeat.

Of course, every job requires an orientation process. In the past, nurses schooled in-hospital did not get very much orientation time, even in more specialized areas. However, now the story is different since the clinical training that once was the focus is no longer at the forefront, so that the costs are bound to be higher than earlier. Looks like corporate may still be reeling from the very idea. :lol2:

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1,613 Visitors; 65 Posts

Even if the new grad was wrong she is A NEW GRAD. Not all nursing education is the same. Some people are fortunate to have great clinical instructors and some of us have to teach ourselves, which is really really difficult. You seem to think she should be teaching herself. If she didn't learn much in nursing school, TEACH HER. Obviously, blaming her preceptors is not going to help her, but surely you can understand what a horrible nightmare she is living now, being fired during her training trying to get a job with no recommendations. She's just venting that her work environment was hostile and cold and judgmental and from reading your post, Ruby Vee, it probably was. Precepting is teaching and with teaching there is a golden rule- positive reinforcement is the MOST effective. Just because one is a seasoned RN does not mean he or she is a good teacher or a good co-worker.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 65 Articles; 170,109 Visitors; 13,914 Posts

even if the new grad was wrong she is a new grad. not all nursing education is the same. some people are fortunate to have great clinical instructors and some of us have to teach ourselves, which is really really difficult. you seem to think she should be teaching herself. if she didn't learn much in nursing school, teach her. obviously, blaming her preceptors is not going to help her, but surely you can understand what a horrible nightmare she is living now, being fired during her training trying to get a job with no recommendations. she's just venting that her work environment was hostile and cold and judgmental and from reading your post, ruby vee, it probably was. precepting is teaching and with teaching there is a golden rule- positive reinforcement is the most effective. just because one is a seasoned rn does not mean he or she is a good teacher or a good co-worker.

i'm curious -- just how many "second chances" should anyone have, new grad or no? is three enough? four? six or seven? this gal had multiple "second chances," and when she complained about her preceptors, she got different preceptors. so how many new preceptors have to note the same problems before the problems are legitimate? three? four? six or seven? no matter how hard a preceptor tries to teach a new grad, the new grad has to be responsible for some learning. a new grad who cannot or will not learn despite multiple new preceptors and multiple second chances isn't going to keep her job, no matter how much we like her or want her to.

so is it always, in your considered opinion, the fault of the preceptor when a new grad doesn't learn? or is some of the responsibility owned by the new grad? at what point is it acceptable to you to cut loose a new grad who just isn't cutting it and give the job to someone who may? or do we just keep employees who aren't working out indefinitely?

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Pepper The Cat has 33 years experience and specializes in Gerontology.

1 Follower; 24,367 Visitors; 1,693 Posts

I agree with Ruby. How many chances should a person be given? At what point do you have to say enough - this person is not learning and is a danger. Do you wait until she actually harms someone. Would you want her taking care of your loved one?

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1 Article; 9,069 Visitors; 442 Posts

in nursing school i was taught that we are responsible for our education and learning, so as adult learners we have to take the lead.

yes, nursing school is a lot of self teaching, but that is commonplace.

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2,665 Visitors; 116 Posts

I only read the first page of this thread, sorry.

I'm in school right now, and fwiw, there are SO MANY students there that I believe will turn out just like the NG the OP talked about. I see a lot of "I'm so brilliant and awesome and everyone hates me for it" attitude already. They have real problems (such as not showing up for lecture, not doing the homework, not studying, failing tests and turning in college papers that might as well be written by a seven year old), but it just never 'clicks' with them why they're having a hard time in a class while the person next to them is in the top 10%. Hopefully, the actual nursing program will shake some of these out, or maybe it will wake them up and they will work it out and be great.

Meanwhile, I'm often concerned about how I am doing, and whether or not I'm screwing up, or missing something, or fostering a bad attitude about something that will bite me in the ayse later, but I don't realize it because my teachers love me and my grades are good. :p

I could be 10 times worse than they are and not realize it!

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FlyingScot has 28 years experience and specializes in Peds/Neo CCT,Flight, ER, Hem/Onc.

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I only read the first page of this thread, sorry.

I'm in school right now, and fwiw, there are SO MANY students there that I believe will turn out just like the NG the OP talked about. I see a lot of "I'm so brilliant and awesome and everyone hates me for it" attitude already. They have real problems (such as not showing up for lecture, not doing the homework, not studying, failing tests and turning in college papers that might as well be written by a seven year old), but it just never 'clicks' with them why they're having a hard time in a class while the person next to them is in the top 10%. Hopefully, the actual nursing program will shake some of these out, or maybe it will wake them up and they will work it out and be great.

Meanwhile, I'm often concerned about how I am doing, and whether or not I'm screwing up, or missing something, or fostering a bad attitude about something that will bite me in the ayse later, but I don't realize it because my teachers love me and my grades are good. :p

I could be 10 times worse than they are and not realize it!

If you are actually worrying about this you probably aren't. ;)

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2,665 Visitors; 116 Posts

If you are actually worrying about this you probably aren't. ;)

Golly gosh I hope not.

I don't know if you've noticed, but I've seen a LOT of threads here where very well meaning new nurses that are trying really hard to be good and successful still make a mistake that could get them fired or end their career. In my working life (which spans about 20 years already and is outside of the medical field) I've made some mistakes that have damaged equipment, cost money or angered someone. But in a hospital, mistakes can kill people.

In a local hospital, a nurse was recently in the papers for exposing almost 500 patients to HIV and hepatitis over a couple of years due to improper use/sanitation of a piece of equipment. Did she know better, should she have known better, did anyone else notice she was doing it wrong?

I don't know. But this is the sort of thing that makes me have that 2nd glass of wine before bed some nights.

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nursel56 has 25+ years experience and specializes in peds//ambulatory care/HH-private duty.

1 Follower; 43,281 Visitors; 6,653 Posts

I only read the first page of this thread, sorry.

I'm in school right now, and fwiw, there are SO MANY students there that I believe will turn out just like the NG the OP talked about. I see a lot of "I'm so brilliant and awesome and everyone hates me for it" attitude already. They have real problems (such as not showing up for lecture, not doing the homework, not studying, failing tests and turning in college papers that might as well be written by a seven year old), but it just never 'clicks' with them why they're having a hard time in a class while the person next to them is in the top 10%. Hopefully, the actual nursing program will shake some of these out, or maybe it will wake them up and they will work it out and be great.

Meanwhile, I'm often concerned about how I am doing, and whether or not I'm screwing up, or missing something, or fostering a bad attitude about something that will bite me in the ayse later, but I don't realize it because my teachers love me and my grades are good. :p

I could be 10 times worse than they are and not realize it!

They probably love you because you're concerned about screwing up, or missing something etc :idea: and the good grades are a sign you are listening to what they are saying. Teachers like to succeed, too! :up:

Even on this board it's hard not to notice the similarities in approach used by students who get supportive responses, and those who don't (the ones who wonder why we're so mean) . . .

As far as the what we can learn from the "I was fired for . . .(insert minor mistake)" stories just remember we're only hearing one side. That being said -- I have to agree there seems to be a trend developing of dealing harshly with errors rather than using them as teaching/learning opportunities. Every incident is unique, just like every person, so don't worry too much about that now.

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