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Question about cna

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by njlpn421 njlpn421 (New Member) New Member

njlpn421 specializes in Sub acute transitional care.

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I my a new LPN working in long-term care. My aides are not respectful to me. They give me an attitude problem all the time they only help the nurses that they like in that have been there for years. I'm sure this is normal in every way through it but is anyone have any advice on how to handle it I tried being nice and helping and it didn't work. They actually hate me more now. I started out as a medical assistant 15 years I have expirenced being Unlicensed medical professional. Why are they like this ? Help

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LPNtoRNin2016OH has 5 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Allergy/ENT, Occ Health, LTC/Skilled.

1 Article; 541 Posts; 16,909 Profile Views

Hmm are you sure your not putting off an air of "I'm the nurse and your just an aide?" accidently? I view the aides as my co-workers, we are a team that assists each other, they have their own boss. I was an STNA for two years before becoming an LPN so I also understand their point of view of things.

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njlpn421 specializes in Sub acute transitional care.

67 Posts; 2,072 Profile Views

I definitely do not have that attitude. I help them. I don't my aides. I referred to them by their name and I thank them every shift and tell him I cannot do my job without them.

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njlpn421 specializes in Sub acute transitional care.

67 Posts; 2,072 Profile Views

I always buy them coffee and bring in food I cooked. Because nobody's got time to eat

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OldGrayNurse has 27 years experience and specializes in Medicare Reimbursement; MDS/RAI.

50 Posts; 1,836 Profile Views

Sometimes it's a matter of perception. Some CNAs, for reasons unknown to me, actually have a harder time following the leadership of nurse they know used to be "one of them".

It could be that you are unknowingly putting out an inexperienced and unsure vibe; they may feel as if you're not capable of taking care of anything that may come up and they think they will be the one blamed for not "catching" someone going south. Mind you, I'm not saying you are, only suggesting a reason. It could also be the exact opposite. Maybe you are brimming with so much self-confidence it is off-putting to them.

Sometimes it is simply a personality conflict.

Regardless of the reason, if you don't garner their respect, you will have a difficult time trying to supervise them.

Have you tried a brief informal team meeting at beginning of shift? Have you thanked them all at the end of the shift for their hard work?

Have you made it clear to them you are there to help but that you have your own tasks to complete and that while you will gladly assist them when you have time, your tasks have to be completed in a timely manner as well?

Do the other nurses have this problem or is it just you? If it's the former, it's time for you all to get together and speak to your DON. If it's just you, you're going to have to figure out why they treat you that way but no one else, and build your solution from there.

I once had the pleasure of working with a CNA who had a huge chip on her shoulder where nurses were concerned. She truly had the impression that my job was solely to assist her with whatever she needed, and would berate me loudly in front of the other CNAs, tell me to "do it myself" if I asked her to do anything she was within her scope to do, and disappear for a half hour at the time and tell no one where she was going. She did this to all the nurses, except when the admin or DON was around.

My management was no help; they thought because she had been there forever she was just "colorful" and "treats everyone like that", and that was okay.

One day when she hollered (literally) for me to come to the room and help her turn a bedbound resident NOW, I simply closed my Med cart, walked over to her, and handed her the keys. She stood there with her mouth open as I said, since you think I don't have anything to do today and you run this hall, YOU go pass out the rest of the meds to the residents. After a beat or two of her just standing there glaring, I took the keys back and told her we all had jobs to do, and just like she wanted to do a good job, so did I. And that meant I couldn't do both mine and hers anymore than she could do both hers and mine. The rest of the day, I asked her to come in with me and help me with every single treatment I had, no matter if it was just a bandaid. I wouldn't budge until she stopped and came. Anytime she ignored me, I just kept calling her. Although she never did like me and would still at times give me some nasty looks or mumble under her breath, she was easier to work with.

In my 20+ years of LTC, I've had some wonderful staff experiences and some horrible ones. I've been able to identify exactly why only about half the time.

Good luck! [emoji4]

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njlpn421 specializes in Sub acute transitional care.

67 Posts; 2,072 Profile Views

Thank you for much. I always say thank you every shift. I think because I'm a new nurse and new to LTC that could be the problem.

But I thank them for helping me and I bought them pizza. I bring in cookies. I know there job is difficult. I help out all the time. But when they unplug my Pt alarms and they fall that's not spiting me. That's harmful to the residents.

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51 Articles; 4,800 Posts; 93,189 Profile Views

Call them on it. "Mr. Such and So's alarm was unplugged during this shift. Should this occur with any of our residents again on my watch, everyone on the shift will be written up for resident care issues."

If they all "hate" you, then it would not be hard for them to fathom that you take a stern approach to patient safety. As you should. There's a difference between them talking smack about you (and who has time to get invested in any of that) and actually sabatoging resident safety.

The later will get them written up.

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OldGrayNurse has 27 years experience and specializes in Medicare Reimbursement; MDS/RAI.

50 Posts; 1,836 Profile Views

Thank you for much. I always say thank you every shift. I think because I'm a new nurse and new to LTC that could be the problem.

But I thank them for helping me and I bought them pizza. I bring in cookies. I know there job is difficult. I help out all the time. But when they unplug my Pt alarms and they fall that's not spiting me. That's harmful to the residents.

Sorry, OP. You didn't speak of them deliberately doing things that put residents in jeopardy in your first post. That's one thing that's not up for negotiation. If they are doing that, it's actually illegal, and you need to warn them and then write them the heck up. Not cool at all. And your supervisors need to be informed immediately. As the direct supervisor for these CNA's you can be held liable for injuries caused by will neglect, no matter it wasn't YOUR neglect. Safety is a huge deal, and had I known that from your original post, I would have said DO NOT tolerate that particular kind of disrespect at all. Never. Not even a little. Do something about it NOW. Today.

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71 Posts; 3,141 Profile Views

Plan and simple some are jealous, some don't like their job, some are just miserable people. But you are in charge remember that, you shouldn't have to kiss their ass and neither should they. Unfortunately some people just lack respect. Just continue to be respectful on your end. If you have time for patient care or to simply make a bed they'll see that and respect that because there are a lot of nurses out there with stuck up tudes and think they're above that. Never delegate out of laziness, if you have the time and can do it yourself, do it. Be firm and stand your ground when need be though, don't let them push you around. Be a team leader and player. As long as you're the best you and best nurse you can be, to hell with those that don't appreciate it because someone will and it will get you far.

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NurseAshleyy has 1 years experience and specializes in LTC.

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I can totally relate to this and I think it's normal as I have seen it happen to other new nurses. In my experience they see new grads as someone coming in thinking they know it all but once they saw that I did truly know what I was doing it was so much better. Being a supervisor is an aspect of the job I was not prepared for at all but I feel it has gotten better and all it took was time. I still come across some that are disrespectful and I am just straight forward with them, we work together and we will act professionally while we do so. Just know you aren't alone!

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downsouthlaff has 9 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Nursing Home.

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LPN in nursing home here , I can honestly say I know your struggle. I was a CNA for 3 years before becoming a Nurse. There were certain Nurses I vowed to never be like. But when you have 35 plus residents to pass meds too, 14 residents to chart on , an I&A to do, physicians orders to take care of, a management that wants you off the clock on time, and there just sitting around shooting the bull, delegation is a must. Sometimes they dislike me because of it but oh well. I'm very lenient with them for the most part. I don't mind them being on there phone, as long as they make rounds and listen to alarms. I don't mind then sitting down and talking amongst each other. But when I need them to do something I need them to do something. I don't care if they like me or not. I have the utmost respect for my CNAs and am good friends with many as I was one in LTC for 3 years. But until you take those keys as an LTC Nurse, get behind that med cart and nurses desk and assume responsibility for 35 plus patients for 8 hours, I don't care if you been a CNA for 35 years or 35 minutes you have no idea what LTC Nurses through and what it's like to work 8 or 12 mentally draining hours and then some.

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222 Posts; 5,161 Profile Views

I've had this problem on occasion, and I dealt with it by ignoring it. However, if they are unplugging alarms and other potentially harmful things, that is absolutely NOT acceptable behavior--that endangers the patients, so it needs to stop, immediately. Talk to your supervisor.

Honestly, it sounds like you're trying too hard by buying them food and stuff. If they want to be snotty, that's OK as long as they do their work. Ignore them. You are all there to care for the patients, not be best buddies. But when their behavior is impacting patient care, it's time to bring it to the boss--that's just not OK.

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