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Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN

Writer

Nurse Practitioner, Coach, Writer

Reputation Activity by Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN

Reactions Given

Like 16

Reactions Received

Like 20

  1. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to winniewoman9060 in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I am working per diem since I retired. I have to still do a portfolio. My ancc med surg certification is coming due next year. So finding out I needed 75 ceus a surprising. 
  2. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I hold two advanced practice certifications via ANCC. I got around the maximum allowed CME by using two accounts with two different emails. I then sent an email to them telling them that since I have to pay well over $700 to keep both current, they need to fix their website. 
     
  3. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    The problems you're describing might be worth bringing to the attention of your state's Board of Nursing (I'm assuming they're the ones doing the mandating and funding the contract with the app developer). If they want to mandate an electronic system for CE tracking, it makes sense to choose one that allows for tracking of multiple licenses and displays data accurately. You are likely not the only one who has experienced these types of unnecessary headaches. I definitely feel your pain, and have found that maintaining my own (paper and electronic) records is still the best way to avoid hassles. 
  4. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I recently renewed my family nurse practitioner credential (FNP-BC) for the first time since successfully sitting for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) national board certification exam 5 years ago. I’ve always loved the idea of lifelong learning, and while I have benefited from leveraging continuing education to enhance my professional development, I’ll admit I’ve been frustrated with the level of detail and complexity involved in maintaining my professional credentials.
    While reflecting on what I can do, moving forward, to streamline my own overall license and credential renewal process, I came up with a list of things I wish someone had told me about continuing education and maintaining my professional licenses and credentials.
    Maintaining those hard-earned professional licenses and credentials requires a bit more than just taking a bunch of continuing education courses (CEs)—you’ll need to develop strategies and tactics for yourself in three categories: 1) knowing your renewal requirements; 2) managing your time and money; and 3) maintaining accurate records.
    In this first article of a 3-part series, I’ll share my view on why knowing your continuing education requirements is more complex than it seems on the surface. Requirements can change, certain CEs may not be recognized at all or in full, and not all types of CE credits convert to the number of hours you may expect. The complexity intensifies when you hold multiple licenses and credentials.
    Requirements Change
    You already know that continuing education and license renewal requirements vary by state, type of license, and credential. But did you know that your continuing education and certification renewal requirements are likely to change over time? Yes, credentialing bodies are constantly reviewing and revising their renewal criteria.
    It’s up to you to stay on top of these changes. First, be sure to get your information straight from the credentialing agency instead of relying on world-of-mouth information. Don’t depend on what your professors told you, what your classmates said, or what your colleagues discussed in the break room. Use what you’ve heard as a launching pad to conduct your own research: Go to the source and see it for yourself in writing.
    Second, build an ongoing plan for staying aware of changes. This means checking in with your licensing or credentialing organization periodically. Professional organizations can provide a gateway to finding out about these changes. Another way is to bookmark your credentialing bodies’ renewal criteria pages and check them routinely. Of course, this doesn’t work unless you actually remember to go and check the sites. I was amazed at how many of the criteria for my FNP board certification changed significantly during my 5-year renewal period.
    Know What Counts
    Not every continuing education activity you do will count for every license or credential renewal requirement you need to fulfill. (I know, right?!) Ideally, any continuing education credit you earn would be applicable cross the board, but that’s not always the case.
    Some CEs may not be recognized in full or at all by every credentialing agency. For example, the ANCC only recognizes 50 percent of the credit earned from providers not approved by the ANCC, and the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) only recognizes CE earned through CA BRN-approved providers. So, if I earn CE credits from a provider that is not recognized by the ANCC or the CA BRN, only half of those hours will count toward renewal of my FNP-BC, and none those hours will not count toward renewal of my state licenses.
    Conclusion? Before I enroll in a CE opportunity, I check to see if the provider is honored by the ANCC and the CA BRN. Being aware of this ahead of time helps me make savvy CE choices, and keeps me from being disappointed, frustrated, or panicked at renewal time.
    Some credentialing bodies allow professional activities other than CE courses to count toward license and/or credential renewal. For example, hours spent in clinical practice, precepting students, volunteering, making presentations, earning an advanced degree, or doing research can all count toward renewing my FNP-BC board certification if documented correctly. But, unfortunately, none of those things except taking academic nursing courses would count toward renewing my CA RN license.
    Knowing your requirements also means paying attention to the specific subject matter covered in the CE opportunity. For example, I need 75 continuing education hours every 5 years to renew my FNP board certification through ANCC and 25 of those must be specific for pharmacology. With this kind of specificity, the key is to make sure I earn enough pharmacology-specific hours to meet the pharmacology requirement. This can be tricky to track because some CE courses offer only a portion of the total hours as pharmacology-specific. For example, a CE course may offer 2 hours of total credit, but only 0.5 hours of that time counts as pharm-specific.
    Do The Math
    Closely related to the idea that not every CE credit you earn will count toward the renewal of every license or credential you hold, is the idea that the credits themselves are counted differently depending on who’s providing and who’s counting. The takeaway is: Know how ahead of time how each of your particular credentialing bodies recognizes, calculates, and converts CE hours.
    Admittedly, counting CE hours can be confusing. Descriptive words are a tip-off to how the calculations may vary. Various providers offer “contact hours,” “continuing education units (CEUs),” or “continuing medical education (CME).”  Words matter because they are not all calculated or recognized the same way. The ANCC offers a conversion formula: 1 contact hour = 1 CME or 0.1 CEU or 60 minutes; 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Make sure you know the conversion formula that is being used by your credentialing body.
    Be aware that any algorithms embedded in online renewal or CE tracking applications should include consistent conversion calculations, but they may not always be accurate. The bottom line: Do your own math and double-check it. Being aware of this and knowing how to count your credits will help you decide which CE opportunities are right for you and prevent the worst-case scenarios of coming up short at renewal time or during an audit.
    Ultimately, continuing education benefits both you and the patients you serve. However, I wish someone had told me, back in the day, that “knowing your requirements” involves in-depth proactive thought and planning, especially when you hold multiple licenses and credentials. My intention in sharing this is to help you streamline your own personal continuing education strategy.
    In Part 2, I’ll share my thoughts managing your time and money to keep continuing education from breaking the bank.
    Meanwhile, here’s a question: What do you wish you’d known about continuing education before you embarked on the adventure yourself?
    Sources and Resources
    5 Reasons to Invest in Continuing Education
    ANCC 2017 Certification Renewal Requirements
    Continuing Education for License Renewal
    Lifelong Learning
  5. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I recently renewed my family nurse practitioner credential (FNP-BC) for the first time since successfully sitting for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) national board certification exam 5 years ago. I’ve always loved the idea of lifelong learning, and while I have benefited from leveraging continuing education to enhance my professional development, I’ll admit I’ve been frustrated with the level of detail and complexity involved in maintaining my professional credentials.
    While reflecting on what I can do, moving forward, to streamline my own overall license and credential renewal process, I came up with a list of things I wish someone had told me about continuing education and maintaining my professional licenses and credentials.
    Maintaining those hard-earned professional licenses and credentials requires a bit more than just taking a bunch of continuing education courses (CEs)—you’ll need to develop strategies and tactics for yourself in three categories: 1) knowing your renewal requirements; 2) managing your time and money; and 3) maintaining accurate records.
    In this first article of a 3-part series, I’ll share my view on why knowing your continuing education requirements is more complex than it seems on the surface. Requirements can change, certain CEs may not be recognized at all or in full, and not all types of CE credits convert to the number of hours you may expect. The complexity intensifies when you hold multiple licenses and credentials.
    Requirements Change
    You already know that continuing education and license renewal requirements vary by state, type of license, and credential. But did you know that your continuing education and certification renewal requirements are likely to change over time? Yes, credentialing bodies are constantly reviewing and revising their renewal criteria.
    It’s up to you to stay on top of these changes. First, be sure to get your information straight from the credentialing agency instead of relying on world-of-mouth information. Don’t depend on what your professors told you, what your classmates said, or what your colleagues discussed in the break room. Use what you’ve heard as a launching pad to conduct your own research: Go to the source and see it for yourself in writing.
    Second, build an ongoing plan for staying aware of changes. This means checking in with your licensing or credentialing organization periodically. Professional organizations can provide a gateway to finding out about these changes. Another way is to bookmark your credentialing bodies’ renewal criteria pages and check them routinely. Of course, this doesn’t work unless you actually remember to go and check the sites. I was amazed at how many of the criteria for my FNP board certification changed significantly during my 5-year renewal period.
    Know What Counts
    Not every continuing education activity you do will count for every license or credential renewal requirement you need to fulfill. (I know, right?!) Ideally, any continuing education credit you earn would be applicable cross the board, but that’s not always the case.
    Some CEs may not be recognized in full or at all by every credentialing agency. For example, the ANCC only recognizes 50 percent of the credit earned from providers not approved by the ANCC, and the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) only recognizes CE earned through CA BRN-approved providers. So, if I earn CE credits from a provider that is not recognized by the ANCC or the CA BRN, only half of those hours will count toward renewal of my FNP-BC, and none those hours will not count toward renewal of my state licenses.
    Conclusion? Before I enroll in a CE opportunity, I check to see if the provider is honored by the ANCC and the CA BRN. Being aware of this ahead of time helps me make savvy CE choices, and keeps me from being disappointed, frustrated, or panicked at renewal time.
    Some credentialing bodies allow professional activities other than CE courses to count toward license and/or credential renewal. For example, hours spent in clinical practice, precepting students, volunteering, making presentations, earning an advanced degree, or doing research can all count toward renewing my FNP-BC board certification if documented correctly. But, unfortunately, none of those things except taking academic nursing courses would count toward renewing my CA RN license.
    Knowing your requirements also means paying attention to the specific subject matter covered in the CE opportunity. For example, I need 75 continuing education hours every 5 years to renew my FNP board certification through ANCC and 25 of those must be specific for pharmacology. With this kind of specificity, the key is to make sure I earn enough pharmacology-specific hours to meet the pharmacology requirement. This can be tricky to track because some CE courses offer only a portion of the total hours as pharmacology-specific. For example, a CE course may offer 2 hours of total credit, but only 0.5 hours of that time counts as pharm-specific.
    Do The Math
    Closely related to the idea that not every CE credit you earn will count toward the renewal of every license or credential you hold, is the idea that the credits themselves are counted differently depending on who’s providing and who’s counting. The takeaway is: Know how ahead of time how each of your particular credentialing bodies recognizes, calculates, and converts CE hours.
    Admittedly, counting CE hours can be confusing. Descriptive words are a tip-off to how the calculations may vary. Various providers offer “contact hours,” “continuing education units (CEUs),” or “continuing medical education (CME).”  Words matter because they are not all calculated or recognized the same way. The ANCC offers a conversion formula: 1 contact hour = 1 CME or 0.1 CEU or 60 minutes; 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Make sure you know the conversion formula that is being used by your credentialing body.
    Be aware that any algorithms embedded in online renewal or CE tracking applications should include consistent conversion calculations, but they may not always be accurate. The bottom line: Do your own math and double-check it. Being aware of this and knowing how to count your credits will help you decide which CE opportunities are right for you and prevent the worst-case scenarios of coming up short at renewal time or during an audit.
    Ultimately, continuing education benefits both you and the patients you serve. However, I wish someone had told me, back in the day, that “knowing your requirements” involves in-depth proactive thought and planning, especially when you hold multiple licenses and credentials. My intention in sharing this is to help you streamline your own personal continuing education strategy.
    In Part 2, I’ll share my thoughts managing your time and money to keep continuing education from breaking the bank.
    Meanwhile, here’s a question: What do you wish you’d known about continuing education before you embarked on the adventure yourself?
    Sources and Resources
    5 Reasons to Invest in Continuing Education
    ANCC 2017 Certification Renewal Requirements
    Continuing Education for License Renewal
    Lifelong Learning
  6. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I recently renewed my family nurse practitioner credential (FNP-BC) for the first time since successfully sitting for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) national board certification exam 5 years ago. I’ve always loved the idea of lifelong learning, and while I have benefited from leveraging continuing education to enhance my professional development, I’ll admit I’ve been frustrated with the level of detail and complexity involved in maintaining my professional credentials.
    While reflecting on what I can do, moving forward, to streamline my own overall license and credential renewal process, I came up with a list of things I wish someone had told me about continuing education and maintaining my professional licenses and credentials.
    Maintaining those hard-earned professional licenses and credentials requires a bit more than just taking a bunch of continuing education courses (CEs)—you’ll need to develop strategies and tactics for yourself in three categories: 1) knowing your renewal requirements; 2) managing your time and money; and 3) maintaining accurate records.
    In this first article of a 3-part series, I’ll share my view on why knowing your continuing education requirements is more complex than it seems on the surface. Requirements can change, certain CEs may not be recognized at all or in full, and not all types of CE credits convert to the number of hours you may expect. The complexity intensifies when you hold multiple licenses and credentials.
    Requirements Change
    You already know that continuing education and license renewal requirements vary by state, type of license, and credential. But did you know that your continuing education and certification renewal requirements are likely to change over time? Yes, credentialing bodies are constantly reviewing and revising their renewal criteria.
    It’s up to you to stay on top of these changes. First, be sure to get your information straight from the credentialing agency instead of relying on world-of-mouth information. Don’t depend on what your professors told you, what your classmates said, or what your colleagues discussed in the break room. Use what you’ve heard as a launching pad to conduct your own research: Go to the source and see it for yourself in writing.
    Second, build an ongoing plan for staying aware of changes. This means checking in with your licensing or credentialing organization periodically. Professional organizations can provide a gateway to finding out about these changes. Another way is to bookmark your credentialing bodies’ renewal criteria pages and check them routinely. Of course, this doesn’t work unless you actually remember to go and check the sites. I was amazed at how many of the criteria for my FNP board certification changed significantly during my 5-year renewal period.
    Know What Counts
    Not every continuing education activity you do will count for every license or credential renewal requirement you need to fulfill. (I know, right?!) Ideally, any continuing education credit you earn would be applicable cross the board, but that’s not always the case.
    Some CEs may not be recognized in full or at all by every credentialing agency. For example, the ANCC only recognizes 50 percent of the credit earned from providers not approved by the ANCC, and the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) only recognizes CE earned through CA BRN-approved providers. So, if I earn CE credits from a provider that is not recognized by the ANCC or the CA BRN, only half of those hours will count toward renewal of my FNP-BC, and none those hours will not count toward renewal of my state licenses.
    Conclusion? Before I enroll in a CE opportunity, I check to see if the provider is honored by the ANCC and the CA BRN. Being aware of this ahead of time helps me make savvy CE choices, and keeps me from being disappointed, frustrated, or panicked at renewal time.
    Some credentialing bodies allow professional activities other than CE courses to count toward license and/or credential renewal. For example, hours spent in clinical practice, precepting students, volunteering, making presentations, earning an advanced degree, or doing research can all count toward renewing my FNP-BC board certification if documented correctly. But, unfortunately, none of those things except taking academic nursing courses would count toward renewing my CA RN license.
    Knowing your requirements also means paying attention to the specific subject matter covered in the CE opportunity. For example, I need 75 continuing education hours every 5 years to renew my FNP board certification through ANCC and 25 of those must be specific for pharmacology. With this kind of specificity, the key is to make sure I earn enough pharmacology-specific hours to meet the pharmacology requirement. This can be tricky to track because some CE courses offer only a portion of the total hours as pharmacology-specific. For example, a CE course may offer 2 hours of total credit, but only 0.5 hours of that time counts as pharm-specific.
    Do The Math
    Closely related to the idea that not every CE credit you earn will count toward the renewal of every license or credential you hold, is the idea that the credits themselves are counted differently depending on who’s providing and who’s counting. The takeaway is: Know how ahead of time how each of your particular credentialing bodies recognizes, calculates, and converts CE hours.
    Admittedly, counting CE hours can be confusing. Descriptive words are a tip-off to how the calculations may vary. Various providers offer “contact hours,” “continuing education units (CEUs),” or “continuing medical education (CME).”  Words matter because they are not all calculated or recognized the same way. The ANCC offers a conversion formula: 1 contact hour = 1 CME or 0.1 CEU or 60 minutes; 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Make sure you know the conversion formula that is being used by your credentialing body.
    Be aware that any algorithms embedded in online renewal or CE tracking applications should include consistent conversion calculations, but they may not always be accurate. The bottom line: Do your own math and double-check it. Being aware of this and knowing how to count your credits will help you decide which CE opportunities are right for you and prevent the worst-case scenarios of coming up short at renewal time or during an audit.
    Ultimately, continuing education benefits both you and the patients you serve. However, I wish someone had told me, back in the day, that “knowing your requirements” involves in-depth proactive thought and planning, especially when you hold multiple licenses and credentials. My intention in sharing this is to help you streamline your own personal continuing education strategy.
    In Part 2, I’ll share my thoughts managing your time and money to keep continuing education from breaking the bank.
    Meanwhile, here’s a question: What do you wish you’d known about continuing education before you embarked on the adventure yourself?
    Sources and Resources
    5 Reasons to Invest in Continuing Education
    ANCC 2017 Certification Renewal Requirements
    Continuing Education for License Renewal
    Lifelong Learning
  7. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in 5 Reasons to Invest in Your Continuing Education   
    Continuing education allowed me to acquire a specialty certification while simultaneously meeting the requirements of maintaining my state licensure. I've always loved the idea of lifelong learning. 
  8. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from tnbutterfly, BSN, RN in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    Your comments speak to an idea that's been rattling around in my head for a long time: Almost all healthcare professionals at all levels could use a refresher course in teamwork, leadership, and communication.  
    "Equality" should be irrelevant on a team because we all have roles to play. One of my communication professors taught a great lesson on teamwork which began with the question, "What would happen on the field if everyone on the football team was a quarterback?" 
    When someone play their role and plays it well, that's when they deserve praise. When everyone plays their role well, that's when everyone benefits.
    I've worked with a couple of old-school docs who were just awful, and I've worked with a couple of old-school docs who were fantastic. Unfortunately cranky personalities show up everywhere all the time, and sometimes we have to work with them. I deal with it by trying to figure out what my role is within that relationship, and then play it well.
  9. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from tnbutterfly, BSN, RN in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    Your comments speak to an idea that's been rattling around in my head for a long time: Almost all healthcare professionals at all levels could use a refresher course in teamwork, leadership, and communication.  
    "Equality" should be irrelevant on a team because we all have roles to play. One of my communication professors taught a great lesson on teamwork which began with the question, "What would happen on the field if everyone on the football team was a quarterback?" 
    When someone play their role and plays it well, that's when they deserve praise. When everyone plays their role well, that's when everyone benefits.
    I've worked with a couple of old-school docs who were just awful, and I've worked with a couple of old-school docs who were fantastic. Unfortunately cranky personalities show up everywhere all the time, and sometimes we have to work with them. I deal with it by trying to figure out what my role is within that relationship, and then play it well.
  10. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I recently renewed my family nurse practitioner credential (FNP-BC) for the first time since successfully sitting for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) national board certification exam 5 years ago. I’ve always loved the idea of lifelong learning, and while I have benefited from leveraging continuing education to enhance my professional development, I’ll admit I’ve been frustrated with the level of detail and complexity involved in maintaining my professional credentials.
    While reflecting on what I can do, moving forward, to streamline my own overall license and credential renewal process, I came up with a list of things I wish someone had told me about continuing education and maintaining my professional licenses and credentials.
    Maintaining those hard-earned professional licenses and credentials requires a bit more than just taking a bunch of continuing education courses (CEs)—you’ll need to develop strategies and tactics for yourself in three categories: 1) knowing your renewal requirements; 2) managing your time and money; and 3) maintaining accurate records.
    In this first article of a 3-part series, I’ll share my view on why knowing your continuing education requirements is more complex than it seems on the surface. Requirements can change, certain CEs may not be recognized at all or in full, and not all types of CE credits convert to the number of hours you may expect. The complexity intensifies when you hold multiple licenses and credentials.
    Requirements Change
    You already know that continuing education and license renewal requirements vary by state, type of license, and credential. But did you know that your continuing education and certification renewal requirements are likely to change over time? Yes, credentialing bodies are constantly reviewing and revising their renewal criteria.
    It’s up to you to stay on top of these changes. First, be sure to get your information straight from the credentialing agency instead of relying on world-of-mouth information. Don’t depend on what your professors told you, what your classmates said, or what your colleagues discussed in the break room. Use what you’ve heard as a launching pad to conduct your own research: Go to the source and see it for yourself in writing.
    Second, build an ongoing plan for staying aware of changes. This means checking in with your licensing or credentialing organization periodically. Professional organizations can provide a gateway to finding out about these changes. Another way is to bookmark your credentialing bodies’ renewal criteria pages and check them routinely. Of course, this doesn’t work unless you actually remember to go and check the sites. I was amazed at how many of the criteria for my FNP board certification changed significantly during my 5-year renewal period.
    Know What Counts
    Not every continuing education activity you do will count for every license or credential renewal requirement you need to fulfill. (I know, right?!) Ideally, any continuing education credit you earn would be applicable cross the board, but that’s not always the case.
    Some CEs may not be recognized in full or at all by every credentialing agency. For example, the ANCC only recognizes 50 percent of the credit earned from providers not approved by the ANCC, and the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) only recognizes CE earned through CA BRN-approved providers. So, if I earn CE credits from a provider that is not recognized by the ANCC or the CA BRN, only half of those hours will count toward renewal of my FNP-BC, and none those hours will not count toward renewal of my state licenses.
    Conclusion? Before I enroll in a CE opportunity, I check to see if the provider is honored by the ANCC and the CA BRN. Being aware of this ahead of time helps me make savvy CE choices, and keeps me from being disappointed, frustrated, or panicked at renewal time.
    Some credentialing bodies allow professional activities other than CE courses to count toward license and/or credential renewal. For example, hours spent in clinical practice, precepting students, volunteering, making presentations, earning an advanced degree, or doing research can all count toward renewing my FNP-BC board certification if documented correctly. But, unfortunately, none of those things except taking academic nursing courses would count toward renewing my CA RN license.
    Knowing your requirements also means paying attention to the specific subject matter covered in the CE opportunity. For example, I need 75 continuing education hours every 5 years to renew my FNP board certification through ANCC and 25 of those must be specific for pharmacology. With this kind of specificity, the key is to make sure I earn enough pharmacology-specific hours to meet the pharmacology requirement. This can be tricky to track because some CE courses offer only a portion of the total hours as pharmacology-specific. For example, a CE course may offer 2 hours of total credit, but only 0.5 hours of that time counts as pharm-specific.
    Do The Math
    Closely related to the idea that not every CE credit you earn will count toward the renewal of every license or credential you hold, is the idea that the credits themselves are counted differently depending on who’s providing and who’s counting. The takeaway is: Know how ahead of time how each of your particular credentialing bodies recognizes, calculates, and converts CE hours.
    Admittedly, counting CE hours can be confusing. Descriptive words are a tip-off to how the calculations may vary. Various providers offer “contact hours,” “continuing education units (CEUs),” or “continuing medical education (CME).”  Words matter because they are not all calculated or recognized the same way. The ANCC offers a conversion formula: 1 contact hour = 1 CME or 0.1 CEU or 60 minutes; 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Make sure you know the conversion formula that is being used by your credentialing body.
    Be aware that any algorithms embedded in online renewal or CE tracking applications should include consistent conversion calculations, but they may not always be accurate. The bottom line: Do your own math and double-check it. Being aware of this and knowing how to count your credits will help you decide which CE opportunities are right for you and prevent the worst-case scenarios of coming up short at renewal time or during an audit.
    Ultimately, continuing education benefits both you and the patients you serve. However, I wish someone had told me, back in the day, that “knowing your requirements” involves in-depth proactive thought and planning, especially when you hold multiple licenses and credentials. My intention in sharing this is to help you streamline your own personal continuing education strategy.
    In Part 2, I’ll share my thoughts managing your time and money to keep continuing education from breaking the bank.
    Meanwhile, here’s a question: What do you wish you’d known about continuing education before you embarked on the adventure yourself?
    Sources and Resources
    5 Reasons to Invest in Continuing Education
    ANCC 2017 Certification Renewal Requirements
    Continuing Education for License Renewal
    Lifelong Learning
  11. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Golden_RN, MSN in What is most important to chart on?   
    Just remember that you can't over chart.  It sounds great that you make time to review your charting at the end of your shift.  You won't always have time to do that, and remember to chart all through your shift as things are happening.  You never know when that emergency will happen right before shift change!
    Your question is way too broad to answer on a message board, and depends on many factors.  It sounds like you are very conscientious and double checking your work, so you are probably doing great.
  12. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I recently renewed my family nurse practitioner credential (FNP-BC) for the first time since successfully sitting for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) national board certification exam 5 years ago. I’ve always loved the idea of lifelong learning, and while I have benefited from leveraging continuing education to enhance my professional development, I’ll admit I’ve been frustrated with the level of detail and complexity involved in maintaining my professional credentials.
    While reflecting on what I can do, moving forward, to streamline my own overall license and credential renewal process, I came up with a list of things I wish someone had told me about continuing education and maintaining my professional licenses and credentials.
    Maintaining those hard-earned professional licenses and credentials requires a bit more than just taking a bunch of continuing education courses (CEs)—you’ll need to develop strategies and tactics for yourself in three categories: 1) knowing your renewal requirements; 2) managing your time and money; and 3) maintaining accurate records.
    In this first article of a 3-part series, I’ll share my view on why knowing your continuing education requirements is more complex than it seems on the surface. Requirements can change, certain CEs may not be recognized at all or in full, and not all types of CE credits convert to the number of hours you may expect. The complexity intensifies when you hold multiple licenses and credentials.
    Requirements Change
    You already know that continuing education and license renewal requirements vary by state, type of license, and credential. But did you know that your continuing education and certification renewal requirements are likely to change over time? Yes, credentialing bodies are constantly reviewing and revising their renewal criteria.
    It’s up to you to stay on top of these changes. First, be sure to get your information straight from the credentialing agency instead of relying on world-of-mouth information. Don’t depend on what your professors told you, what your classmates said, or what your colleagues discussed in the break room. Use what you’ve heard as a launching pad to conduct your own research: Go to the source and see it for yourself in writing.
    Second, build an ongoing plan for staying aware of changes. This means checking in with your licensing or credentialing organization periodically. Professional organizations can provide a gateway to finding out about these changes. Another way is to bookmark your credentialing bodies’ renewal criteria pages and check them routinely. Of course, this doesn’t work unless you actually remember to go and check the sites. I was amazed at how many of the criteria for my FNP board certification changed significantly during my 5-year renewal period.
    Know What Counts
    Not every continuing education activity you do will count for every license or credential renewal requirement you need to fulfill. (I know, right?!) Ideally, any continuing education credit you earn would be applicable cross the board, but that’s not always the case.
    Some CEs may not be recognized in full or at all by every credentialing agency. For example, the ANCC only recognizes 50 percent of the credit earned from providers not approved by the ANCC, and the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) only recognizes CE earned through CA BRN-approved providers. So, if I earn CE credits from a provider that is not recognized by the ANCC or the CA BRN, only half of those hours will count toward renewal of my FNP-BC, and none those hours will not count toward renewal of my state licenses.
    Conclusion? Before I enroll in a CE opportunity, I check to see if the provider is honored by the ANCC and the CA BRN. Being aware of this ahead of time helps me make savvy CE choices, and keeps me from being disappointed, frustrated, or panicked at renewal time.
    Some credentialing bodies allow professional activities other than CE courses to count toward license and/or credential renewal. For example, hours spent in clinical practice, precepting students, volunteering, making presentations, earning an advanced degree, or doing research can all count toward renewing my FNP-BC board certification if documented correctly. But, unfortunately, none of those things except taking academic nursing courses would count toward renewing my CA RN license.
    Knowing your requirements also means paying attention to the specific subject matter covered in the CE opportunity. For example, I need 75 continuing education hours every 5 years to renew my FNP board certification through ANCC and 25 of those must be specific for pharmacology. With this kind of specificity, the key is to make sure I earn enough pharmacology-specific hours to meet the pharmacology requirement. This can be tricky to track because some CE courses offer only a portion of the total hours as pharmacology-specific. For example, a CE course may offer 2 hours of total credit, but only 0.5 hours of that time counts as pharm-specific.
    Do The Math
    Closely related to the idea that not every CE credit you earn will count toward the renewal of every license or credential you hold, is the idea that the credits themselves are counted differently depending on who’s providing and who’s counting. The takeaway is: Know how ahead of time how each of your particular credentialing bodies recognizes, calculates, and converts CE hours.
    Admittedly, counting CE hours can be confusing. Descriptive words are a tip-off to how the calculations may vary. Various providers offer “contact hours,” “continuing education units (CEUs),” or “continuing medical education (CME).”  Words matter because they are not all calculated or recognized the same way. The ANCC offers a conversion formula: 1 contact hour = 1 CME or 0.1 CEU or 60 minutes; 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Make sure you know the conversion formula that is being used by your credentialing body.
    Be aware that any algorithms embedded in online renewal or CE tracking applications should include consistent conversion calculations, but they may not always be accurate. The bottom line: Do your own math and double-check it. Being aware of this and knowing how to count your credits will help you decide which CE opportunities are right for you and prevent the worst-case scenarios of coming up short at renewal time or during an audit.
    Ultimately, continuing education benefits both you and the patients you serve. However, I wish someone had told me, back in the day, that “knowing your requirements” involves in-depth proactive thought and planning, especially when you hold multiple licenses and credentials. My intention in sharing this is to help you streamline your own personal continuing education strategy.
    In Part 2, I’ll share my thoughts managing your time and money to keep continuing education from breaking the bank.
    Meanwhile, here’s a question: What do you wish you’d known about continuing education before you embarked on the adventure yourself?
    Sources and Resources
    5 Reasons to Invest in Continuing Education
    ANCC 2017 Certification Renewal Requirements
    Continuing Education for License Renewal
    Lifelong Learning
  13. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in 5 Reasons to Invest in Your Continuing Education   
    Continuing education allowed me to acquire a specialty certification while simultaneously meeting the requirements of maintaining my state licensure. I've always loved the idea of lifelong learning. 
  14. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to FolksBtrippin in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    I want to revise this, because telling the doc you need haldol is not really a problem. 
    There was other stuff that was really bad where I worked. From a bully nurse manager who ran over the docs. Just over the top stuff.
    But I don't  feel like I can say it here.
    Anyway, suffice it to say that there are nurse bullies, doctor bullies, social worker bullies, patient bullies. It takes confidence and skill to make your point without being dismissive or servile. And not everyone has it.
  15. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to FolksBtrippin in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    I have seen both problems. I have seen RNs (at the direction of the nurse manager)  boss physicians (and NPs) unfairly. And I have seen physicians (and one particular NP from a direct entry school) mistreat RNs. 
    Some people truly don't  understand the difference between listening and obeying. Physicians should always listen to nursing staff, but that does not mean obey, necessarily. 
    The doc has over a hundred patients. The nurse has far less. The nurse knows what's going on with her patient and is trained to report her concerns. A doc who is irritated by the data he gets just because it came from the nurse is failing to work in the best interest of the patient and also wasting time. 
    But when nurses ask docs to do their bidding without taking the time to explain why or skip pass the assessment data (I need a haldol order vs. Patient is agitated and responding to internal stimuli, per history haldol has worked in the past) they are not respecting the liability that the doc is taking on and the doc's  role. 
    And I agree with the previous poster that we ought to respect each other's expertise on the team. 
  16. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Spadeforce in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    There is and always will be a hierarchy in healthcare. This does not mean that people should disrespect each other, but the liability usually comes back to the physician hence why they are higher on the hierarchy. This is not a discussion of intrinsic human value but one of workplace roles. Physicians should not be condescending and be so aloof that they do not listen to input of nurses, and I also would not consider a physician to be a nurses "boss" (they have nurse-bosses for that). But the roles of physician and nurse are not equal since the role of a physician has more responsibility than the typical nursing staff.  But they are both important so respect should go both ways.
     
    From prior experience the physicians who treat nurses like mud puppies are not good people to work with/good physicians. But the nurses who aim high and think they could run the place better and demand equality to physicians are just as wrong.
  17. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in What I Wish I’d Known About Continuing Education: Know Your Requirements [Part 1 of 3]   
    I recently renewed my family nurse practitioner credential (FNP-BC) for the first time since successfully sitting for the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) national board certification exam 5 years ago. I’ve always loved the idea of lifelong learning, and while I have benefited from leveraging continuing education to enhance my professional development, I’ll admit I’ve been frustrated with the level of detail and complexity involved in maintaining my professional credentials.
    While reflecting on what I can do, moving forward, to streamline my own overall license and credential renewal process, I came up with a list of things I wish someone had told me about continuing education and maintaining my professional licenses and credentials.
    Maintaining those hard-earned professional licenses and credentials requires a bit more than just taking a bunch of continuing education courses (CEs)—you’ll need to develop strategies and tactics for yourself in three categories: 1) knowing your renewal requirements; 2) managing your time and money; and 3) maintaining accurate records.
    In this first article of a 3-part series, I’ll share my view on why knowing your continuing education requirements is more complex than it seems on the surface. Requirements can change, certain CEs may not be recognized at all or in full, and not all types of CE credits convert to the number of hours you may expect. The complexity intensifies when you hold multiple licenses and credentials.
    Requirements Change
    You already know that continuing education and license renewal requirements vary by state, type of license, and credential. But did you know that your continuing education and certification renewal requirements are likely to change over time? Yes, credentialing bodies are constantly reviewing and revising their renewal criteria.
    It’s up to you to stay on top of these changes. First, be sure to get your information straight from the credentialing agency instead of relying on world-of-mouth information. Don’t depend on what your professors told you, what your classmates said, or what your colleagues discussed in the break room. Use what you’ve heard as a launching pad to conduct your own research: Go to the source and see it for yourself in writing.
    Second, build an ongoing plan for staying aware of changes. This means checking in with your licensing or credentialing organization periodically. Professional organizations can provide a gateway to finding out about these changes. Another way is to bookmark your credentialing bodies’ renewal criteria pages and check them routinely. Of course, this doesn’t work unless you actually remember to go and check the sites. I was amazed at how many of the criteria for my FNP board certification changed significantly during my 5-year renewal period.
    Know What Counts
    Not every continuing education activity you do will count for every license or credential renewal requirement you need to fulfill. (I know, right?!) Ideally, any continuing education credit you earn would be applicable cross the board, but that’s not always the case.
    Some CEs may not be recognized in full or at all by every credentialing agency. For example, the ANCC only recognizes 50 percent of the credit earned from providers not approved by the ANCC, and the California Board of Registered Nursing (CA BRN) only recognizes CE earned through CA BRN-approved providers. So, if I earn CE credits from a provider that is not recognized by the ANCC or the CA BRN, only half of those hours will count toward renewal of my FNP-BC, and none those hours will not count toward renewal of my state licenses.
    Conclusion? Before I enroll in a CE opportunity, I check to see if the provider is honored by the ANCC and the CA BRN. Being aware of this ahead of time helps me make savvy CE choices, and keeps me from being disappointed, frustrated, or panicked at renewal time.
    Some credentialing bodies allow professional activities other than CE courses to count toward license and/or credential renewal. For example, hours spent in clinical practice, precepting students, volunteering, making presentations, earning an advanced degree, or doing research can all count toward renewing my FNP-BC board certification if documented correctly. But, unfortunately, none of those things except taking academic nursing courses would count toward renewing my CA RN license.
    Knowing your requirements also means paying attention to the specific subject matter covered in the CE opportunity. For example, I need 75 continuing education hours every 5 years to renew my FNP board certification through ANCC and 25 of those must be specific for pharmacology. With this kind of specificity, the key is to make sure I earn enough pharmacology-specific hours to meet the pharmacology requirement. This can be tricky to track because some CE courses offer only a portion of the total hours as pharmacology-specific. For example, a CE course may offer 2 hours of total credit, but only 0.5 hours of that time counts as pharm-specific.
    Do The Math
    Closely related to the idea that not every CE credit you earn will count toward the renewal of every license or credential you hold, is the idea that the credits themselves are counted differently depending on who’s providing and who’s counting. The takeaway is: Know how ahead of time how each of your particular credentialing bodies recognizes, calculates, and converts CE hours.
    Admittedly, counting CE hours can be confusing. Descriptive words are a tip-off to how the calculations may vary. Various providers offer “contact hours,” “continuing education units (CEUs),” or “continuing medical education (CME).”  Words matter because they are not all calculated or recognized the same way. The ANCC offers a conversion formula: 1 contact hour = 1 CME or 0.1 CEU or 60 minutes; 1 CEU = 10 contact hours. Make sure you know the conversion formula that is being used by your credentialing body.
    Be aware that any algorithms embedded in online renewal or CE tracking applications should include consistent conversion calculations, but they may not always be accurate. The bottom line: Do your own math and double-check it. Being aware of this and knowing how to count your credits will help you decide which CE opportunities are right for you and prevent the worst-case scenarios of coming up short at renewal time or during an audit.
    Ultimately, continuing education benefits both you and the patients you serve. However, I wish someone had told me, back in the day, that “knowing your requirements” involves in-depth proactive thought and planning, especially when you hold multiple licenses and credentials. My intention in sharing this is to help you streamline your own personal continuing education strategy.
    In Part 2, I’ll share my thoughts managing your time and money to keep continuing education from breaking the bank.
    Meanwhile, here’s a question: What do you wish you’d known about continuing education before you embarked on the adventure yourself?
    Sources and Resources
    5 Reasons to Invest in Continuing Education
    ANCC 2017 Certification Renewal Requirements
    Continuing Education for License Renewal
    Lifelong Learning
  18. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN got a reaction from tnbutterfly, BSN, RN in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    Your comments speak to an idea that's been rattling around in my head for a long time: Almost all healthcare professionals at all levels could use a refresher course in teamwork, leadership, and communication.  
    "Equality" should be irrelevant on a team because we all have roles to play. One of my communication professors taught a great lesson on teamwork which began with the question, "What would happen on the field if everyone on the football team was a quarterback?" 
    When someone play their role and plays it well, that's when they deserve praise. When everyone plays their role well, that's when everyone benefits.
    I've worked with a couple of old-school docs who were just awful, and I've worked with a couple of old-school docs who were fantastic. Unfortunately cranky personalities show up everywhere all the time, and sometimes we have to work with them. I deal with it by trying to figure out what my role is within that relationship, and then play it well.
  19. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Jory, MSN, APRN, CNM in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    I'll tell you what I have told other physicians:
    I don't work FOR you, I work WITH you.  I work FOR the hospital.  There is no "above" and "beneath" here.  
  20. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Davey Do in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    Good subject, angeloublue22.
    With the old Docs, I wonder if it's the God complex thing. I got into nursing about the time the older Docs still expected nurses to be their handmaidens and the young Docs were introducing themselves by their first name.
    Too bad this older Doc couldn't see the value of the team approach, something I was introduced to in the late 80's. The medical director of our chemical dependency treatment unit would sit down with the nurses and therapists, discuss patients and give perspectives. I loved being a part of the team and learning from my colleagues.
    Oh well. Old mindsets die hard.
     
  21. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Emergent in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    I worked with an awful doctor who also was so disrespectful and condescending of nursing.  She was in her 50s but had only been a doc 5 years tops.
    She had a veneer of being an extremely hip, progressive person, very liberal, liberated, an outdoor fanatic; the last person you'd expect to be a hierarchical throwback to 1960 in the workplace. 
    Eventually she was driven out by the sheer force of the nurses who could not tolerate this insufferable woman.
  22. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to angeloublue22 in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    I worked with a very old school doctor. She has held on to old school ways of looking at healthcare. For instance, doctors are in charge of nurses. I love speaking with her because she gives a lot of insight into how healthcare has changed. The only thing is she not willing to change with it.
    The other day she got angry after speaking about focusing on team care and not so much hierarchy, which is encouraged and used by everyone else in the facility. I'm the lead nurse in small satellite facility and at the main office there is a supervisor case manager RN that she must work with. After we both got promoted and she was approached by the case manager RN to see a client about a med issue, she started to complain to me. She stated...

    I again brought up the team approach and informed her that we see the clients more and can recognize their needs faster and more accurately, so of course we should have a major influence in decision making. She of course argued back and I let it go because I wasn't going to change her mind.  I was flabbergasted that she said any of this. After she kept complaining to every nurse and not listening to our recommendations, which was effecting patient care, she was asked by the other providers (team players) to not return to our facility and they would work extra to cover her shifts. 
    This was a rant but also a heck yeah for our awesome providers.
    Has anyone else had this issue with providers?
  23. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Melissa Mills, BSN in 5 Reasons to Invest in Your Continuing Education   
    Continuing education - these two words either excite you or send you into a state of boredom-induced slumber unmatched by pretty much anything else in life. Nurses are required to complete continuing education to maintain their licensure. However, experts tell us that there are more significant benefits to continuing education than just keeping our ability to practice the craft of nursing.
    Here are a few reasons you should spend your time and money investing in your future.
    Maintaining Licensure
    Every state in the U.S. has a different set of expectations for nurse continuing education requirements. Some states mandate a certain number of continuing education. Others have specific courses or topics they require to address issues that happen in the state, such as child abuse, domestic violence, or laws governing your practice.
    Providers of continuing education courses must meet specific rules to ensure that information is current and meets laws and nursing practice as it changes. This safeguards you from completing materials today that was outdated years ago. Be sure your up to date on what you need to know about nursing licensure.
    Improving Safety
    Your patients expect to be safe when in your care. No one wants to be responsible for adverse drug events, falls, or other unsafe patient situations. While it is impossible to eliminate errors altogether, it should still be your goal.
    When nurses participate in continuing education that focuses on best-practices, patient-centered care, and safety prevention - errors lessen and patient satisfaction increases.
    Fostering a culture of lifelong learning in nursing is one of the pivotal practices that keep patients safe. In fact, when the 1999 To Err is Human: Building a Safer Healthcare System was published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), it showcased some scary numbers about patient safety:
    Up to 98,000 patients die each year due to preventable medical errors Medical errors cost up to $29 billion each year nationwide You might think that the IOM would have been looking for high-tech ways to rectify these numbers. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the IOM joined forces to establish eight recommendations with goals for the next 20 years. Half of the strategies created to fix the issues found were based solidly in education. The four learning strategies included implementing nurse residency programs, increasing the percentage of nurses with a baccalaureate degree, doubling the number of nurses with a doctorate, and engaging nurses in lifelong learning.
    I believe that this study illustrates the strength of continuing education in nursing. When nurses are empowered to increase their own understanding of the profession, patients are safer and more satisfied with their care.
    Meeting Certification Requirements
    Have you considered becoming certified in a nursing specialty? Accrediting bodies often have their own requirements you must meet to maintain your certification. You might need to complete courses on specific topics or areas to achieve the necessary requirements.
    For example, if you’re like me and have a certification in Case Management, you’ll need to show that you’ve completed 80 hours of approved continuing education specific to being a case manager. Many courses will meet the requirements you need for your certification while also keeping you compliant with your state board of nursing.
    Gaining New Skills and Meeting Changes
    Healthcare is becoming more innovative every day. From new drugs and treatments to the use of artificial intelligence and virtual reality, there’s so much to learn. Instead of waiting for hands-on training opportunities to come to you on the job, consider enrolling in a CE course that provides an overview of skills you know you’re going to need.
    It’s essential to remember that not all new skills are technical. While learning how to use equipment or how to assess for specific diseases is necessary, sometimes the skills you need most are interpersonal. If you’re struggling at work with communication, time management, or you’re considering moving up the career ladder, there are courses to help you gain the knowledge you need.
    Advancing Your Career
    Whether you’re considering certification, returning to school, or just want to stay up on the latest research - all of this learning will help to advance your career. Continuing education is an excellent place to start if you’re considering changing your specialty. You can choose a few courses to take to learn the basics of just about any nursing niche out there so that you can find out if it might be right for you.
    Continuing education might be mandated. However, if you can flip the script on how you approach continuing education requirements you might find that there are many reasons to invest in your professional development.
    How you do feel about mandated continuing education? Do you enjoy it or do you just complete it because it’s required to maintain your certification?
  24. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to MargentinaCarter in Older Student, Unprofessional Nurse During Clinical   
    I know this response is 10 months old. But please know yes there are a lot of unprofessional healthcare professionals with no sense of compassion or patience with patients. But you be that change, you be that compassionate, professional nurse that's doesn't act horribly & make horrible comments just because a patient or another person hurt their feelings or pride. I have been a nurse 20 years & have had to take a lot from patients & their family, but I always try to remember they would not be under our care if they did not need us. I try to remember they are scared & have lost all control over their life in the moments of illness. I get frustrated & have days where I miss my family & feel they take more than I can give, but I shut my mouth & I go outside to breathe, scream, cry or pray for strength to get through the day/week or minutes. So please stay who you are. You was not at all wrong for asking that question & wondering if this is norm. in nursing. It shouldn't be & it truly hurts & makes nurses with ethics & morals embarrassed by this behavior. We should hold ourselves to a higher standard @ all times & not blame patients for how we react. We chose to be healthcare professionals, most didn't choose to be patients.
  25. Like
    Lane Therrell FNP, MSN, RN reacted to Davey Do in Seriously?!?   
    Yes, hawaiicarl, my nursing friend told me that if you cut off your nose to spite your face  it will grow back and my friend knows what she's talking about!
    She's an expert in the area of noses and she was recently honored by allnurses with an award:

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