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beachynurse BSN

Registered User

Reputation Activity by beachynurse

Reactions Given

Like 24
Haha 1
Disagree 1

Reactions Received

Like 47
Sad 1

  1. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from Amethya in PARENTS say the darndest things   
    Psychic powers or your crystal ball..... I get the same thing....I got chewed out because a kid fell down the stairs and hurt her leg, why didn't I call Mom... Well, I have to know about the injury in order to call????? The kid never came to the clinic because the bell had rung and she was afraid she would miss her bus..
  2. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from CanIcallmymom in Does your state allow you to give medication without a Health care provider order?   
    I actually like this. It protects us from liability and we have enough to worry about already...
  3. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to Keeperofthebandaids, BSN, RN in PARENTS say the darndest things   
    ADD medicine capsule found in Kinder's pocket.  Called mom.  "Oh, I was sending that home with him for Grandma to give it to him after school."  The apple doesn't fall far from the tree!
  4. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to Blue_Moon, BSN in PARENTS say the darndest things   
    Yes this! Or the ones that argue, but they were fine when I dropped them off!!! Ok well I'm not making this up, I have better things to do so come and get them!
    I had a TEACHER inform ME the flu was going around and was I aware? Oh I don't know, are YOU aware there are kids learning today?
    I had a parent furious with me because her son scraped his hand on the fence but didn't come and tell me about it or tell any teachers he got hurt. So she throws his hand in my face and says LOOK. It was literally a tiny superficial scratch that he said didn't even bleed. Ok well aside from the fact it's minor, exactly how exactly am I supposed to be able to help him if I don't know again??? 🤔 
     
  5. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to Horseshoe in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    Let's assume for the sake of argument that YES, all of the criteria for a criminal charge and conviction of this nurse have been met. I believe that the purpose of criminal charges and incarceration are twofold: to punish criminals and to deter others from doing the same.
    If RV is convicted, yes, the punishment part of the equation will have been met. People can get their pound of flesh and be happy that a criminal has been taken off the street and out of the hospital corridors. 
    Will it result in deterrence? Will fewer medication errors be made because this particular nurse was held to account in a criminal court, thus scaring the rest of us straight and making us think twice about skipping any part of the processes that are in place to prevent such errors?  I imagine that a lot of us will think about this case as we go about our days. 
    The problem I see here is that it is highly likely that though PERHAPS medication errors may decrease by some small percentage in the very short term, the VOLUNTARY REPORTING of medication errors will suffer a HUGE hit. No one wants to suffer criminal consequences of a mistake, no one wants to see their peers suffer criminal consequences of a mistake. Even though the chances of being criminally charged for a medication error are still small, there will now be a *perception* that in addition to the usual consequences of medication errors, now we can be arrested for making a medication error.
    I think when weighing the public benefit of putting a nurse in jail for a pretty egregious series of negligent acts vs. the inevitable deterioration of a process intended to analyze and correct reasons for medication errors, thus preventing more of the same in the future, we need to be really really careful. It may feel good in the short term to punish someone for incredible stupidity, to get retribution for taking a life (in a terrible manner) and for breaking down public trust in our profession as a whole. In the long run and big picture, putting her in jail doesn't do anything to further protect the public. I think in the long run, it puts the public in even more peril because now errors will be covered up, a culture of secrecy is implicitly encouraged, and we lose the chance at the self reflection that allows the discovery of new ways to improve patient safety.
    JMO.
  6. Disagree
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to Wuzzie in Nurses Call the Governor of Tennessee   
    Yes, wouldn’t it be wonderful if we continued to support unsafe nurses by offering slaps on the wrist for despicable lapses in judgement. 
  7. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to ronny1067 in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    Vanderbilt should be ashamed of themselves....  Ultimately they are responsible.
  8. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to mtnNurse., BSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    I understand why you think that. We can only imagine what type of nurse she usually is because we don't know. I imagine her to be usually prudent and then horrible circumstances led her to fail to be as aware / critically-thinking / present-in-the-moment as nurses "should be" every second of the work day without fail, regardless of the work environment and regardless of circumstances. I picture her in those 30 min. or hour or longer (sorry I forget how long from the time she was delegated to do the med. pass and pushing the med) accidentally grabbing the wrong medicine, preparing it, pushing it, and failing to monitor afterwards. I also picture her being in a mindless rush and can imagine many environmental circumstances leading her to be in a mindless rush. Just one example, could miscommunication have led her to believe that someone else would have eyes on the patient -- NOT an excuse as someone would argue, that SHE should not have monitored herself. But none of what I am saying is an excuse for her failing to do everything the right way. There could be many excuses though of why the criminal charges don't apply and why she ought not to be locked up in prison and labeled a felon. 
    There's a big difference between being reckless, stupid, and momentarily mindless...and in fact therein maybe lies the difference in whether criminal charges could apply. Two years is not a lot of experience. "Should have known" and "did know" are two different things. 
    I do think I'm more prone to want to give her the benefit of the doubt (again, not in excusing what she "should have" done as a nurse but excusing that what she did do is not criminal behavior) than some of you awesome superstar critical care nurses who have decades of experience under your belts, because it's more recent in my mind how overwhelming the first couple years of work are. Maybe she didn't have enough experience to be in the resource role she was in. Maybe she was striving so hard to be a "good worker" and didn't know yet how to prioritize better and how to stand up to pressures to work faster. Can any of you try harder to imagine what that day was like for her, and so imagine that perhaps consequences such as loss of licensure is warranted, but years in prison and life-time label as felon for this is cruel and unusual punishment? 
  9. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to Katillac in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Couldn't agree more. And most schools have exactly zero tolerance for a student practicing outside their scope, or refusing to respect boundaries set by instructors or God forbid a facility nurse in a clinical. And the idea of this girl in nursing school watching to make sure nurses at her clinicals were "doing things right"? She wouldn't last 10 minutes. 🤣

    But I disagree with having her submit questions in writing, or talking with her further about the consequences of her behavior. She's not listening, and way too much time that should be spent on patient care by the PSW and the OP is already being wasted on attempting to manage this chickie. Every time it happens, I'd just say. "We've been over this. That's the kind of question I won't be answering," and then redirect her to a PSW-appropriate task.  I'd keep a quick tick list of times it happens to cover my six in case the excrement hits the air mover, but management already knows what's happening and elects to do nothing. Not OP's problem to fix, just to manage toward least disruption by and maximum productivity out of this subordinate. 
  10. Haha
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to LockportRN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Got my first laugh of the day! Thanks!
  11. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from audreysmagic, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Wow, I'm going to completely disagree with you here. I don't see the RN as having the ege, I see the PSW having an ego. It appears that she feels that with her minimal amount of training that she feels that she knows as much as the nurses. This can be very dangerous. I don't feel the nurse is being rude at all, I feel the PSW is being rude by questioning the ability of a person with qualifications that she is nowhere close to having. It would be one thing if another nurse was questioning another nurse, but, a subordinate questioning a superior, no way.... You are way off base.
  12. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    How horriffic for both the nurse,  and the patient's family. While I am horrified at the medication error, that's what it was. A tragic medication error that should have been utilized as a training tool to prevent something like that from ever happening again. The hospital needed to look at it's procedures and put new ones in place. As far as her license, I am sure that the guilt that she feels is more punishment than losing her license could ever be. I think that would be way too harsh. Possibly be mandated to take some medication training, monitored for a time and then returned to full duty. I think that is a much fairer outcome. We as nurses can be so cruel to each other, and I understand that this error cost a life, it was just that, an error. And by no means am I minimizing the error, I totally understand it's cost. We see physicians make deadly and costly errors and they go back to practice as though nothing happened, but nurses are crucified. Lets stop that kind of behavior, please!!!!!
  13. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from audreysmagic, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Wow, I'm going to completely disagree with you here. I don't see the RN as having the ege, I see the PSW having an ego. It appears that she feels that with her minimal amount of training that she feels that she knows as much as the nurses. This can be very dangerous. I don't feel the nurse is being rude at all, I feel the PSW is being rude by questioning the ability of a person with qualifications that she is nowhere close to having. It would be one thing if another nurse was questioning another nurse, but, a subordinate questioning a superior, no way.... You are way off base.
  14. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from audreysmagic, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Wow, I'm going to completely disagree with you here. I don't see the RN as having the ege, I see the PSW having an ego. It appears that she feels that with her minimal amount of training that she feels that she knows as much as the nurses. This can be very dangerous. I don't feel the nurse is being rude at all, I feel the PSW is being rude by questioning the ability of a person with qualifications that she is nowhere close to having. It would be one thing if another nurse was questioning another nurse, but, a subordinate questioning a superior, no way.... You are way off base.
  15. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from audreysmagic, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Wow, I'm going to completely disagree with you here. I don't see the RN as having the ege, I see the PSW having an ego. It appears that she feels that with her minimal amount of training that she feels that she knows as much as the nurses. This can be very dangerous. I don't feel the nurse is being rude at all, I feel the PSW is being rude by questioning the ability of a person with qualifications that she is nowhere close to having. It would be one thing if another nurse was questioning another nurse, but, a subordinate questioning a superior, no way.... You are way off base.
  16. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from audreysmagic, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Wow, I'm going to completely disagree with you here. I don't see the RN as having the ege, I see the PSW having an ego. It appears that she feels that with her minimal amount of training that she feels that she knows as much as the nurses. This can be very dangerous. I don't feel the nurse is being rude at all, I feel the PSW is being rude by questioning the ability of a person with qualifications that she is nowhere close to having. It would be one thing if another nurse was questioning another nurse, but, a subordinate questioning a superior, no way.... You are way off base.
  17. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to JollyBug92, BSN, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    I have to disagree with you, but I'm wondering how you came to this conclusion regarding me having a huge ego and needing to humble myself.
    A personal support worker (PSW) is a very important job, but her job is to turn patients in bed, feed them, bathe them, help them with getting dressed and such. These are all important things to do, but do not require years of training to do. Even so, I do not pick apart her bed making skills, or how she applies a brief. This PSW does not handle medications, do wound care, or receive and transcribe doctors' orders, so she does not need to know how that's done or be taught how to do those things. Remember, training takes time. What is the point of training if she isn't even supposed to do a task? If it were part of her job, as laid out by our director, the PSW job description, and the facility policy and procedure manual, I would be more than happy to teach her how to perform safe medication administration and other such tasks. As it is, she is not allowed to do those tasks. It has nothing to do with her capabilities. She is simply not qualified to do them as she is not a nurse, and if she were to do them (which would be against our facility policy), it would result in harm to our patients and would result in her termination.
    I don't think it's acting high and mighty when I tell her that she does not need to know how to do things because she is not going to be doing them. If I teach her how to do the things she asks, this implies that she can do these tasks, does it not? I don't think that's being egotistical when I refuse to teach her, I think that's reminding her that she cannot do a task and keeping my patients safe.
    She has asked to be trained to do things, like flush a chest port or draw up and administer a narcotic, which involves a lot more than just a 5 minute lesson even when you hold a nursing diploma or degree. Of course, when she asked to be trained to do that, I refused: I am protecting my patient as this is a task reserved for nurses in our facility. Beyond the fact that such tasks are only to be performed by a nurse as per our facility policy and procedure manual, it would be putting my patients at risk AND my licence at risk if this PSW were to do those tasks. She is not even supposed to have access to the codes and keys to access supplies and medications, which to me says "If you can't have the keys, you can't use whatever is in that cart/room". How would I explain to my director that I let this PSW do such tasks when it is not in the PSW job description and the P&P manual specifically states that all medications, including oral medications, controlled substances, medicated ointments, medicated oral rinses, ear drops, inhalations, and eye drops are only to be accessed and administered by registered nurses and registered practical nurses.  
    Again, I am protecting my patients. Their safety is of utmost concern to me. I don't mind being questioned, but as this happens only with this PSW, and it happens multiple times a shift, it's getting old.
    Lastly, every minute she spends pulling apart assessments, giving unwarranted (and unsafe) recommendations, and sending me on wild goose chases is a minute that I could have spent doing something else. Those add up over the day to a heck of a lot of minutes! Of course, I have to prioritize, but I always take her claims as true until proven otherwise, so I'm often leaving a less dire task to deal with her claim. 
  18. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from audreysmagic, RN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Wow, I'm going to completely disagree with you here. I don't see the RN as having the ege, I see the PSW having an ego. It appears that she feels that with her minimal amount of training that she feels that she knows as much as the nurses. This can be very dangerous. I don't feel the nurse is being rude at all, I feel the PSW is being rude by questioning the ability of a person with qualifications that she is nowhere close to having. It would be one thing if another nurse was questioning another nurse, but, a subordinate questioning a superior, no way.... You are way off base.
  19. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    How horriffic for both the nurse,  and the patient's family. While I am horrified at the medication error, that's what it was. A tragic medication error that should have been utilized as a training tool to prevent something like that from ever happening again. The hospital needed to look at it's procedures and put new ones in place. As far as her license, I am sure that the guilt that she feels is more punishment than losing her license could ever be. I think that would be way too harsh. Possibly be mandated to take some medication training, monitored for a time and then returned to full duty. I think that is a much fairer outcome. We as nurses can be so cruel to each other, and I understand that this error cost a life, it was just that, an error. And by no means am I minimizing the error, I totally understand it's cost. We see physicians make deadly and costly errors and they go back to practice as though nothing happened, but nurses are crucified. Lets stop that kind of behavior, please!!!!!
  20. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    How horriffic for both the nurse,  and the patient's family. While I am horrified at the medication error, that's what it was. A tragic medication error that should have been utilized as a training tool to prevent something like that from ever happening again. The hospital needed to look at it's procedures and put new ones in place. As far as her license, I am sure that the guilt that she feels is more punishment than losing her license could ever be. I think that would be way too harsh. Possibly be mandated to take some medication training, monitored for a time and then returned to full duty. I think that is a much fairer outcome. We as nurses can be so cruel to each other, and I understand that this error cost a life, it was just that, an error. And by no means am I minimizing the error, I totally understand it's cost. We see physicians make deadly and costly errors and they go back to practice as though nothing happened, but nurses are crucified. Lets stop that kind of behavior, please!!!!!
  21. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to hyllisR, MSN, RN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    I think she should be reprimanded, but not lose her license. According to CMS, there are 100,000 deaths due to medical errors each year. Are all of these doctors losing their license?
    I promise you, whenever an incident like this happens, it is never one person at fault. It is a system process error. I am just not ready to put all of the blame on this nurse. For example, how is a paralytic readily "available"? What pharmacy does that? In my facility because a paralytic is only used to intubate, or when a patient is intubated, paralytics are only available in critical care areas and they are in a "kit" for intubation drugs. We just do not have all of the information available to us. I fear we are only hearing about this because she is a nurse.
  22. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    How horriffic for both the nurse,  and the patient's family. While I am horrified at the medication error, that's what it was. A tragic medication error that should have been utilized as a training tool to prevent something like that from ever happening again. The hospital needed to look at it's procedures and put new ones in place. As far as her license, I am sure that the guilt that she feels is more punishment than losing her license could ever be. I think that would be way too harsh. Possibly be mandated to take some medication training, monitored for a time and then returned to full duty. I think that is a much fairer outcome. We as nurses can be so cruel to each other, and I understand that this error cost a life, it was just that, an error. And by no means am I minimizing the error, I totally understand it's cost. We see physicians make deadly and costly errors and they go back to practice as though nothing happened, but nurses are crucified. Lets stop that kind of behavior, please!!!!!
  23. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to mbarthold in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    What happened to "Errors are SYSTEM process errors"?
    And the 'no-blame' culture? Don't be afraid to report a mistaken. We're not interested in punishing you - we want to help fix the problem so it doesn't happen again.
    It seems to be missing, somehow.
  24. Like
    beachynurse, BSN reacted to Amethya in POTS/Dysautonomia   
    Okay cool! Thanks for the info!
  25. Like
    beachynurse, BSN got a reaction from Amethya in POTS/Dysautonomia   
    I talk to the student and the parents and find out what their symptoms and reactions are, and determine what response needs to happen in school. I prepare an emergency plan for teachers to follow until I can get to the classroom and take over. It's just simple step by step directions what to possibly look for and what to do. 
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