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magnoliablush ASN, RN

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Reputation Activity by magnoliablush

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Haha 1

  1. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to NurseLiz22 in Went from failing NCLEX at 265 to passing in 75!   
    Hi everybody! I read so much on here about other people's NCLEX stories, and I promised myself that if I passed this thing that I would do the same to hopefully give others some confidence and the ability to see the light at the end of the tunnel we call NCLEX. 
    First off, my school had us using Kaplan. I took the 3-day review course and did q-bank questions and completed all of the other tests. My scores never went up, and I didn't feel like I was learning anything. A month passed, and I used other resources like Saunders which also did not help much. All of my classmates and friends took the test and passed, and they were only using Kaplan and were getting scores similar to mine (50's), so I figured that I was fine. The morning before the test, I found out that my dream job that I interviewed for turned me down. I took all 265 questions and nearly ran out of time, which I responded to by quickly trying to finish the last 40 because I didn't want to have the last 60 scored just in case I was below the passing line. I did the Pearson Vue trick once I got home that night and again in the morning, and got the "bad pop-up". I found out I failed later that day.
    I honestly cried for 6 hours straight after seeing my results, and allowed myself to feel bad for myself the next 2 weeks. Nobody else in my class failed except me. Nobody I knew was using UWorld, but after reading reviews on this website and online, I decided to take the demo. I felt completely connected with UWorld while using it, and instantly felt like I was learning so much from the pictures and details provided in their rationales. From that day forward, I ditched Kaplan and studied 6 hours a day with UWorld. I decided to apply to jobs again, and was offered a job on the spot that was contingent on passing my NCLEX next time. I continued to study UWorld every day, and ended up not finishing the entire QBank before taking my NCLEX again (I had about 500 questions left). I focused on taking the self-assessment, which I got 87th percentile in and a very high chance of passing. I also went back to Kaplan just to take their readiness test after using UWorld, and I got a 65%! When I approached the NCLEX the 2nd time, I told myself I would be there for the full 265 questions and 6 hours. After an hour and a half and 75 questions, it stopped. It was a different test this time, with completely different questions. I knew I passed right then and there, and it was because of my determination and UWorld! I did the Pearson Vue trick, and got the "good pop-up". My license was posted the next day and now I am in orientation at a job that I love.
    YOU... can do this!!! Seriously. Don't for a second doubt your ability or your worth over a test. If I can go from failing in 265 questions to passing in 75 you can, too. It might seem tough now but the fact is: you will always have a second chance at the NCLEX! Never forget that good things are waiting for you ahead despite how terrible you might feel right now. I believe in you!!!
  2. Haha
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in School Title   
    Several of my high school kids call me “nurse lady” which I just roll my eyes to. Then they try again with Nurse first name. Some just call me by my first name, with a Miss added in. 
  3. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to Persephone Paige, ADN in Is this insubordination? How do I deal with this PSW?   
    Meee too! 
    Great idea about the writing it down. Once everything has been answered, ask for a copy and whip it out. "I refer you you bullet point #4." Or tape it to your back! 
     
  4. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to nursingstudentx96 in UWorld?   
    That is awesome! Congratulations :D I have heard many good reviews!
  5. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from nursingstudentx96 in UWorld?   
    All this!! It was worth it. It helped me to recall the entire nursing program. I passed the NCLEX on my first try, in 75 questions. 😊
  6. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to laflaca, BSN, RN in My very first squad call   
    Great job!  No need to be moving anyone around, especially if they're not in immediate danger and you can't rule out head or spine injuries.  You move him onto a wheelchair or bed, you might hurt something and they're just going to have to move him again, right?  No need to be using our Girl Scout skills to forage for splint materials in the ditch, either (EMS has really nice splints, backboards and c-collars, plus pain meds!)

    Airway's good, breathing's good, circulation's good, nothing's immediately life threatening....you assessed, you kept things from getting worse, you got him to a higher level of care, and you'll follow up afterward to make sure he gets what he needs at school.  Sounds perfect to me.

    And why are they always wearing those skinny, skinny jeans when they hurt their legs?  🙂 

     
  7. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from nursingstudentx96 in UWorld?   
    All this!! It was worth it. It helped me to recall the entire nursing program. I passed the NCLEX on my first try, in 75 questions. 😊
  8. Haha
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in School Title   
    Several of my high school kids call me “nurse lady” which I just roll my eyes to. Then they try again with Nurse first name. Some just call me by my first name, with a Miss added in. 
  9. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to OldDude in FYI   
    It's gonna be a learning experience for the staff. Just be patient and firm. You might remind the staff they are personally responsible if something goes sideways under a similar circumstance.
  10. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to 37changes, ASN, RN in UWorld?   
    UWorld is worth every penny, IMO.  If you're ready to get started and have the time, go for however long you think you'll need.  It is a GREAT tool, and many times I wished I had had it during my program.  The rationales (often with pictures!) are excellent.
    I opted for the 90-day package with two assessments after graduating.  I knew I wouldn't need 90 days (unless I didn't pass) but I wanted those two assessments.  
  11. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to Pili_in_the_PICU in I PASSED - and First Post woo hoo   
    Wow you guys. I did it! I'm officially an RN!
    I just wanted to share my experience because many people are going through this and I understand the stress.
    I passed on February 4th with 75 questions in about 2 hours (plus the Special Research Section at the end)
    I had 35 SATAs, a lot of priority, pharm, and unit management type of questions. The whole time I was second-guessing myself, but I did. not. change. my. answers. *phew*
    I graduated in December. Our school provided Kaplan live training and integrated Phase 1 in to our final semester. I didn't get my ATT until January 20th, at which point I started studying.
    I used Kaplan's Qbank and Question Trainers, completing all but 400 of the Qbank questions, and all but the last Question Trainer (#7). My scores ranged from 57-78%, average score being 68%. My remediation dedication was far from perfect: sometimes I just didn't remediate. I usually gave every test a once over, noting the places where my brain went off course or any huge dearth of knowledge. 
    I also used Saunder's Comprehensive Review, which I had throughout nursing school. I divided the chapters in the book by the number of days I had to study. I averaged about 5 chapters per day, flipping through the content, reading whatever seemed distant or unfamiliar, and completing the questions. I didn't do all of the Chapters, however...
    In the final week of my preparation I became sick with acute bronchitis (adenovirus? still never went to the doctor) ... I plugged away, through fever and night sweats, since my brain still seemed to function. However, the 3 days before my exam, I was so burned out, that I did not study one bit!
    That's right, I did NOT study the 3 days before my exam. I had *not* reviewed everything. I was off of my predetermined study schedule. But, I passed!
    I was a great student in Nursing School, getting that 4.0. However, I did not remember everything, despite my honest attempts. There's no way to know everything. My success in school and the NCLEX came down to TEST TAKING SKILLS. I think the Kaplan decision tree is a great system if you struggle with test taking skills. It gives you a systematic way to break down the question. I think, if you do this enough, it becomes second nature. I think I already did this to an extent, which is why I did well in school. Only one measure of understanding, but unfortunately the main skill that is necessary to pass the NCLEX. Harness that test taking power, ya'll. It'll get you there!
  12. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to GlitterPrincess in Passed NCLEX in 75 questions!   
    Hey gang,
    I wanted to share my NCLEX experience with everyone, and hope it can help you if you're preparing to write your NCLEX. I wrote my exam yesterday morning (bright and early at 0800). I got maybe 4-5 hours of sleep the night before my exam, as I was super anxious and couldn't shut my brain off for the life of me. The morning of the exam I got up at 0630, ate some peanut butter toast, drank a RedBull and a large glass of water. I left my house and got to the testing centre around 0720. The check in process was quick and painless, the staff were super friendly at the testing centre! I was seated and started my exam probably around 0745. My exam shut off at 75Q’s and I walked out with my stomach in knots and I just had this overwhelming feeling of failure. I was done my test in less than an hour. I was certain I had failed. I kept thinking “I didn’t get any of X, Y, Z type questions- why didn’t I get any of those? I must have done so bad if I didn’t get that many of those types”. I also felt like I was only 100% certain on maybe 5Q’s. The rest I felt like I was making educated guesses and critically thinking out the wazzoo! My husband picked me up and we went for breakfast, I was in that mood where you want to laugh and cry at the same time because you can’t possibly believe what just happened.
    While we were in the parking lot of the restaurant I got the email from Pearson-Vue indicating I had completed the exam, so I decided to try the PVT- to my surprise I got the ‘good pop up’. Although, this was a relief, I still couldn’t believe it. I tried not to get too excited until I received my official results. I spent the rest of the day cleaning and taking down Christmas decorations (I know super late but my entire January was occupied with studying 😂). I found out this morning at 0830 that I officially passed!
    Upon reflection of my exam experience I would have to say- it was not difficult overall (content wise). At the time I felt like I did so poorly, but this was because I was actually doing well. This test is designed to get harder the better you’re doing. It’s designed to test your critical thinking and deductive reasoning given your basic nursing knowledge. Were there things I had never heard about on there? Absolutely. Did I have to break words down to try and figure out what they meant? You bet! Did I have to stop and remind myself to breath from time to time? Yes! 

    I used Uworld and the Mark K audios while studying. I always did about 100Q’s a day (sometimes in larger tests [25-50Q’s] and sometimes in smaller tests [5-10Q’s] depending on the content and how I was feeling). I finished the majority of the questions bank minus 70 pharmacology questions. My scores ranged from 20-80% on my Uworld practice tests. Regardless of my scores I always read the rationales. On my Uworld assessment I scored in the 92nd percentile. I took a few days off here and there, and had adequate breaks throughout the day. I drank way too much coffee and RedBull, and got myself into the worst sleeping schedule. I stayed sane by eating nutritious meals/snacks, drinking lots of water and praying PRN! The combination of Uworld, and Mark K were awesome! I feel like they both over prepared me content-wise, and they fine tuned my critical thinking skills and my ability to answer NCLEX style questions. I would recommend the combination of the two to everyone 😊 To be honest, if you're still in nursing school I would recommend tracking down the Mark K audios and giving them a listen (he simplifies and explains things SOOOO well). I didn't find them until halfway through my month of studying (so I was solely using Uworld), and I wish I would have known about them sooner! 

    My two biggest NCLEX tips would be: do practice questions, and manage your anxiety. Remember to take deep breaths, remember to pause and gather your thoughts and feelings (both while you're studying and during the actual exam). Studying, and preparing, for the NCLEX is very important, but the NCLEX is not content heavy. It is more so, do you know the bare-minimum of nursing knowledge, and can you critically think/apply that knowledge. Don't psych yourself out (or keep yourself up at night) thinking about all of the things you need to memorize, and all of the things you don't know yet. Keep saying to yourself "I am going to be an RN".💘
    I hope this helps 💟
  13. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from FutureNurseInfo in Med-Surg: Survival Tips   
    Keep in mind you need to know your nursing interventions. You’ve done the A&P, now focus on what the nurse will do. I really recommend looking at how to answer questions. Like remembering the A, B, C’s,  Maslow, and such! Just knowing the information isn’t enough, try to apply the nursing intervention... if you can only do one thing to keep that patient alive or safe...which one is it? That will help. 😊med surg is hard, but not impossible. You can do it! 
  14. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to Orca in New to Correctional Nursing, any tips?   
    I have been an RN for 20 years, the last 14 of it in corrections, with eight as a DON. I will try to give you some information that you can use.
    1. Stick to your policies and procedures. Deviation from them is the road to compromise, and that is a place where you don't want to be.
    2. Be courteous and pleasant, but not overly friendly. Don't share any details of your personal life with inmates. They don't need to know that you're dating, that you have two daughters, that you went clubbing last night or that you're going on vacation in two weeks. Many inmates are experts at taking tidbits of personal information and using them to gain your confidence. This is another avenue to compromise. You start to feel comfortable around a particular inmate and you begin to confide in him. He will "understand" what you are going through. Before you know it, you're in over your head. I have seen even experienced correctional medical staff fall into this particular trap.
    3. Spare the terms of endearment and excessive hands-on treatment. Inmates are not "sweetie", "honey" or anything other than their names. I normally refer to them as Mr. or Ms. No first names, because that implies familiarity. No way to get in trouble with that. Confine any hands-on treatment to only what is necessary to get the job done. No physical comforting, no hugs. Any of this can be misinterpreted as romantic interest. You are not working with people who are skilled at maintaining appropriate interpersonal boundaries. Keep it professional.
    4. You will be in an environment where you will hear a lot of profanity and slang. Keep these out of your dealings with inmates. Be professional and you will be respected.
    5. Don't go into an area with an inmate alone, or turn your back to an inmate when you are working. Keep sharps secure (scissors, needles, etc.). These have value on the yard, and inmates will steal them at any opportunity.
    6. Set limits. If an inmate starts cursing or yelling or is discourteous or threatening, conclude your business and hand the matter over to custody. This isn't a hospital, where you have to placate angry people because they are customers. If an inmate started yelling or arguing with me, I told the officer "We're done here. He can go now." Word will get out that you won't be intimdated or take verbal abuse.
    7. The information network on the yard is large and word gets around quickly. If you just broke up with your husband or boyfriend, or you got totally wasted last weekend, it will be all over the yard in short order if you mention it to or around an inmate. I never mention family, the area of town where I live or anything that I have planned or have done around an inmate. There are no pictures of family or hobbies or travels in my office. That is deliberate. The less that I share with inmates, the better.
    8. Do not do any favors for inmates. Don't take anything out or bring anything in for them, or do for one what you would not do for all. This snowballs quickly, as one of our dental assistants soon learned when she started bringing in CDs for her "favorite" inmate. He used the threat of reporting her to coerce her into more and more "favors", including sexual ones.
    9. If you tell an inmate that you are going to do something, follow through. This mainly applies to things like referrals, ordering medications and the like.
    10. Remember that inmates live in a world with a lot of sameness and monotony. Your interaction with them, whether it is positive or negative, will be a bigger part of their day than it would be were they on the outside. Things stick with them.
    11. Keep your conversation guarded if inmates are in the area. They are expert eavesdroppers.
    12. If an inmate says something inappropriate to you, call him on it immediately. Ignoring it is allowing it.
  15. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from KeeperOfTheIceRN, ADN in CPR Instructor   
    I am. The school board paid for me to do it, but I really only got certified so that I can teach the high schoolers. Here in 10th grade we get the entire class certified in CPR/AED/FIRST AID. So, the gym teacher & I got certified. The school board keeps our supplies, so we grab them when we need. We do put on a teacher class or two every year, but we get compensated for it. I'm glad I did it. 
    It wasn't too bad, a full day of class, then we had to be monitored teaching a full class, and then we were done. Just keep a binder with all the teaching/lesson plans, and make sure you have the supplies you need. Teaching was really not difficult. It was mostly a little bit of talking and a lot of pushing the DVD button. Then you watch the students doing the work, checking them off on each thing. Being organized for class (printing out the forms and such) was half the battle. The actual classes are not super hard. 
  16. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from KeeperOfTheIceRN, ADN in CPR Instructor   
    I am. The school board paid for me to do it, but I really only got certified so that I can teach the high schoolers. Here in 10th grade we get the entire class certified in CPR/AED/FIRST AID. So, the gym teacher & I got certified. The school board keeps our supplies, so we grab them when we need. We do put on a teacher class or two every year, but we get compensated for it. I'm glad I did it. 
    It wasn't too bad, a full day of class, then we had to be monitored teaching a full class, and then we were done. Just keep a binder with all the teaching/lesson plans, and make sure you have the supplies you need. Teaching was really not difficult. It was mostly a little bit of talking and a lot of pushing the DVD button. Then you watch the students doing the work, checking them off on each thing. Being organized for class (printing out the forms and such) was half the battle. The actual classes are not super hard. 
  17. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in NCSN are you certified?   
    I am not. I am working on my BSN, so until I finish that, I can't. I will say that I am in a rural district. My pay will not increase. It is a small school, and small county. I am not positive I will get certified, I really don't know how long I want to be a school nurse. If I wanted to keep doing it, I may, and move districts. I think it is a good thing to have!
  18. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN got a reaction from NutmeggeRN in Got offered a school nurse job..over 2 weeks ago   
    I was offered the job and then it took about a month until the school board met. I had to be "appointed" by the board, so it was normal for me. 🙂 No worries, it should be fine. If you are concerned, just give them a call and ask. 
    Congratulations!
  19. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to kidzcare in Make Up Your Mind Please!!!   
    Perfect!
    Silence is a greatly underused communication technique! I've done a lot of reading on effective communication and this is one strategy that use all the time! It really gives the impression of confidence even if you are not feeling confident in what you are saying at all. Or, I guess more accurately, filling silence because it feels uncomfortable comes off as insecure or unknowledgeable. 
    What's the saying? Better to stay silent and be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt 🙂
    **not saying anyone on this board is a fool! It's just a good life message 🙂
  20. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to EnoughWithTheIce in Make Up Your Mind Please!!!   
    Sometimes I will call a parent and just say "__________told me you wanted a phone call." Then, I say nothing else. Awkward as heck for them, funny for me. 
  21. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Make Up Your Mind Please!!!   
    I believe this is the most genius thing today and I will be using it!!
  22. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to OldDude in Return after flu   
    The exposure has already occurred before the fever showed it's head. As we all know, the cough is going to be present until everything that isn't supposed to be there is cleared. Try not to worry about it too much. 
  23. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to CanIcallmymom in Return after flu   
    A residual cough from an illness can sometimes take weeks to go away. If they are fever free and not coughing to the point where the teacher can't teach, I'd personally let them stay. But use your judgement. Have you talked to his parents this morning?
  24. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to Wuzzie in Nursing instructor gave a Warning for being late to first day of clinicals despite emailing her? What should I do?   
    She was clearly pissed and borderline inappropriate. You wouldn't lose your license over this. That's ridiculous. That being said you're off to a bad start with this one. The bets I can offer you is to keep your head down, do what she asks, be an exemplary student and don't be late again...ever!
    Also, you need to have a frank discussion with your mother. You cannot take on parental responsibilities that put you in this kind of position. 
  25. Like
    magnoliablush, ASN, RN reacted to tonyl1234 in Med-Surg: Survival Tips   
    Apply everything back to your fundamentals.  And every new thing you learn, it all starts relating to each other.  Don't treat it like you're learning something completely new.  Treat it like an extension of what you already know.
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