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Dacatster

Dacatster

Registered User

Posts by Dacatster

  1. Could be an issue of clicques too. I have seen where this has played an issue in a few ER's I worked. Basically during my eveal I would put as my goal as having more trauma experience, and my managers always helped me get that. I also worked on  skills. It got word I was a good stick and a good person to be in trauma. It was never a problem after that. Just show your peers you are dependable.

  2. When I worked PEDS ER, that was my biggest complaint from coworkers. I tried not too criticize others, however, I would upgrade them if needed. One of our regular charge nurses, that had worked there for over 25 years placed a patient as a green, level 4 on EIS system. His chief complaint was tongue was big. I am not sure how she triage him, but I settled the patient right away, and he was in full blown anaphylaxis . I ungraded him to a red, level 2. Sometimes brain farts happen. she admitted it was a brain fart.

  3. Not sure why the doctor doesn't help when short staffed? I never left bruised or sore after working in the PEDS ER for many years, even with parents that refuse to restrain child. Often had to do many an IV, lab draw cath because I didn't have help I either asked the parent or doctor to help hold. 

  4. Edited by Dacatster

    I went from working from a adult renal diabetic unit to Ped stem cell transplant/step down CV surg. It was considered a PICU at my hospital, we were specially trained Hem oc and CV plus the rest of the picu stuff. I am not going to lie, it was a rough year. But I did find my calling in peds. I absolutely never ever wanted to do peds until then. Basically, I was desperate to get out of my med surg unit, 17 patient to one RN, with one lpn under you. You had 9 pt they had 8 you had to do all assessment, IVP labs, blood, dr. calls. It sucked. So I went PICU were we had 1-2 pt at a shift. 20 years later with 18 years as a peds,picu, peds er nurse. Now getting ready to go into family med at a resident clinic with majority of pt peds.   

     

    Caroline you can do it. Don't beat yourself down, don't let her beat you down. Remind her your were med surg, not peds, not icu. 

  5. I worked BMT back in 2000 for a year. I liked it, the deaths were sad. the hardest part for me was stupid drama of the family, for example 1 family getting kicked out of the RMH for watching porn in the lobby of the place on a wide screen tv.  I ended up going to PEDS ER at a level 1 trauma center, there we seen many deaths, most were traumatic, unexpected. I was able to brush most off my shoulder until 2008.

    In 2005 my nephew was diagnosis with 2 brain tumors, he was 17 at the time. He under went 2 brain surgeries, chemo, 2 BMT, often being seen the ER I worked at in 2008 he died in the PICU just right above where I worked at. I had a horrible time with that. My first day back from his funeral, I had a new diagnosis brain tumor of a teen boy came through. His only complaint was headache. Ended up with same tumor as my nephew. 

    All I could think of is that poor kid is going to go thru something horrible and end up like my nephew. I later had a friend whose son died of a brain tumor at the age of 12.  Can I just say I hate brain tumors?

    I don't know how much this helped you. But me 11 years alter, I still feel the pain.

     

  6. So I live in NWI I have applied at many md's office. I have 20 years experience. The most a md office was willing to pay was $22/hr. Now Chicago pays in mid to upper $30 for there outpatient/office nurses at the major hospitals. I ended up taking a job in SB for the $30. Is it really unexpected of me to expect at least in the upper $20's? I realize a md  office is a different pace/Skill of nursing, not easier, just different. So I can understand a little difference in pay. But really the $20 an hour was a slap in the face. I honestly can not believe nurses would accept it. It wasn't just settle patients and make appts. Two of the jobs were working for an asthma allergy doctor, where you do allergy testing and mixing the serum, and other respiratory stuff. I have worked in the ER in level 1 trauma, I don't expect the $42/hr I was making there. But less then half, seriously.

  7. Has anyone noticed there is a decrease a peds units in various areas of the country? It seems like most community hospitals in my area no longer want to care for this population. Simple RSV, pneumonia, dehydration, is no longer admitted. Instead sent home for parents to care for. Has this actually cause a rise in PICU admissions or transfers to a pediatric hospital? Just curious to your thoughts? I have worked in various areas of ped the last 20 years. PICU, ER level 1 trauma center, Peds at a rural community hospital.  

  8. Can you help a nurse out. I worked in ER for over 8 years awhile ago, for the life of me. I can not recall meds and doses of Anaphylaxis. I believe Epi is 1;1000 IM 1 amp q5 min, Ranitidine  ? , Solumedrol 60 mg IV , and Diphenhydramine 50 mg IV. Does that seem right? Thanks

  9. Not exactly sure where to look. I have heard that there were some online schools that students can enroll that already have a degree. My Husband has a BS in Accounting and has been working as an account for over 20 years. He hates it/ burned out. He thinks I am lucky because I am RN and my work schedule is 3 12 hr shifts a week. I always said once our kids are out of high school, he could get his nursing degree. Accounting paid the bills. Well the time is almost here.

    My question does anyone know of any online to get his ADN. How does he do the clinicals? Do they set up their own sites? He has plenty of science and math classes, but he graduated in 95, not sure if they will still count.

    Any suggestions would be helpful.

  10. Op I hear you. I understand the vent. Some people just have to get on their high horse and jump down your throat for no reason. The fact you continued to clean the patient up after each mess, tells me how dedicated you are to your job. Thank you. If we can't vent amongst ourselves to people that have experienced the monotony of our job, who can we? A high five to infinite0meow.

  11. That is okay i cold quit about 5 years ago when a freak of a manager used her cronies (cna) to spy on everyone. It was a teaching facility and a second year resident wanted to cath a baby. Mom okayed, I was supervising, I have done probably over thousands, working in peds for 10 years, 8 being in a peds er. It was a boy, so only one hole to go for. Well there was no urine. The cna reported to the manager, that I was too scared to cath the patient and asked the resident, he didnt get it. Come to find out this has happened frequently with this patient. He was a sickler, so he has multiple cath's.

    The ghetto manager belittled me,questioned my ability over a cna. When I told her I what really happened, she called me a liar, because her spy would not lie. She told me I needed to pull my big girl panties up and deal with it. I informed her after my shift, she would never see me again. For 2 hours after the incident she would come by, harassand insult me. I knew if I left, she would report me for abandonment. I still to this day, will never feel bad for cold quitting.

  12. I say you give us her email and bombard her her for being so stupid and trying scare tactics. Then I say you give us the dean and president email so we bombard them for hiring a fool to teach something as important as nursing. I am sick of this crap from instructors. I dealt with it too many years ago.

  13. It some aspects you are right, I dont like seeing my fellow nurses thongs and butt crack. I also dont think avoiding make up is an issue. Seriously, how many timed have you see a doctor sweat? They dont if all the do is resd charts and talk with family. They can look like a princess. However if they are doing manual labor. Then I guarentee they dont glisten.

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