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newRNinthecity

newRNinthecity

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  1. newRNinthecity

    I'm a nurse. Also a birth mom. Any others?

    Thanks guys, I appreciate all the suggestions. I definitely plan on shadowing several units of interest. I did some counseling in the past, but haven't thought of doing it in quite some time. Doing a little counseling/therapy is definitely a good suggestion that I will consider. I still have a few more months until I can transfer (I have just been day dreaming of escaping med surg, and making a plan in advance lol) so we will see where I end up after some thought.
  2. newRNinthecity

    I'm a nurse. Also a birth mom. Any others?

    I got pregnant at 19, at the beginning of college. I chose adoption. Hardest thing I have ever done and will ever do in my entire life. I think about him every single day. I went on to graduate with a nursing degree. Hated OB rotation in school - reminded me too much of my son. Totally wrote off working with kids or babies when I graduated. I started on a mostly geriatric med surg floor, where I am now. I have realized med surg is not for me. I am now in my mid twenties and I have come a long way from the broken hearted 19/20 year old that I was. I no longer want to cry when I see happy new mothers with their babies. Seeing babies actually makes me smile. Anyways, I am starting to think that a mother-baby/postpartum unit would be a perfect fit for me. It really appeals to me right now. (Definitely not L&D...I can wipe c-diff poop any day, but the mess of delivery grosses me out). I've also considered the NICU, but think that would be a little more stressful. The only thing is that I am a little nervous about what working with babies might be like. Are there any other nurses that are birth moms out there? Ever worked with babies after you became a nurse? I've honestly never met another birth mother in my life. Probably because we do not go around advertising this fact about ourselves. But just interested in some input if there are any of you out there. I really want to go for it once I finish up a year on my med surg floor. Just nervous that emotions might come with it.
  3. newRNinthecity

    Where to go from here (Med Surg, that is)?!

    Thanks for the info! I'm interested in mother/baby because it seems like a generally happier environment and generally happier people. In med surg I do like my little old ladies and cute old men, especially the ones that like to tell stories - but I never have time to talk to them and its definitely not a happy environment! I'm sure mother/baby can be stressful and have difficult patients, but it seems like it would at least be better to be stressed out in that environment.
  4. newRNinthecity

    Where to go from here (Med Surg, that is)?!

    Hello! I'm getting closer to the end of my first year in nursing on a busy med surg floor at a big city hospital. After the 6 or 7 month mark, I finally got into my grove and started getting some enjoyment from my work...no longer dreading upcoming shifts. Sometimes I leave work feeling like I made a difference for someone... but most of the time I leave (more like, run out) feeling super stressed, overworked, and in need of a long time to de-stress. I definitely do NOT like med surg. Too much chaos. I don't feel the passion for the job that I want to feel. I could maybe stick it out in med surg longer if I had a good schedule, but most newer nurses here have to rotate nights/days/weekends - and for me, I need to be doing something I enjoy more if I am going to work this crazy schedule. Our unit has a constant turnover of new RNs. People stay 1-2 years and leave or transfer units. So I know its not just me. I can internally transfer at the year mark. 1 year med surg seems like a solid foundation to be able to transfer somewhere with. But I have no clue where I want to go! There are always openings on most units, so I think there will be quite a few doors open. I initially wrote off working with babies when I finished school, but now I am realizing I might actually like it. Has anyone gone from med surg to Postpartum/Mother Baby or the NICU? Was the transition easy? How does it differ from med surg (besides the obvious patient populations)? I've given some thought to GI lab (endo), but have heard thats a pretty desirable position and hard to get. Also may need some experience recovering people from anesthesia. I've also thought a little about the OR - but a little scared to make a commitment to it and then not like it. I think I would miss some aspects of being on a floor. Not really interested in going to ICU. Not interested in L&D. I honestly picture myself in an outpatient setting one day unless I find my niche in the hospital. I'm planning on shadowing on some different units once it gets a little closer to the one year mark. No clue where I want to go, but I know for certain I don't want to stay where I am. Any suggestions on places to shadow? Any med surg nurses that have had successful transitions elsewhere?!
  5. newRNinthecity

    New Nurse on Med Surg Floor

    I'm a new nurse 7 months in on a med surge floor. I actually wrote a few panicking posts like this around 3 months in also. I felt like med surg was not for me (still maybe true) and I was a horrible nurse and things would never get better. It does start to get better...I'm honestly still waiting on more time for things to continue to get better...but every shift gets a little better. I still have days where I am running up and down the hall, feeling swamped, trying to think straight. But then there are other days where I will realize, "Wow I just gave a blood transfusion, had a patient pushing 200s systolic BP, a patient with crazy blood sugars, an admission, etc...and I kept my cool, asked for help when needed, and took care of it!" No day will be perfect, and all nurses have stressful days no matter what. There have still been some recent days where I left work wanting to cry due to the sheer stress I felt. I still ask questions all the time, and there are always resources available for things you don't know. Little by little, I find myself worrying less about work the night before a shift, feeling more confident, and even enjoying the work I do on some days. I definitely don't feel totally confident, but it has improved. I still have trouble seeing the "big picture", but that also gets better every day. When I first started it felt like a patient had this list of diagnoses, and all these orders that were like puzzle pieces that did not fit together. I wish I could read the whole chart, but obviously we don't have time for that. I have found that reading the most recent physician progress note and the admission note (if time allows) is helpful to determine what exactly we are focused on doing for the patient. I write down all my little thoughts (recheck a BP, make sure a patient got a dinner tray, etc) or else I will forget them. I usually put an empty check box next to things I need to do, so that I can check them off when complete. I am very type A, so it drives me crazy that all my boxes are never checked off and I keep adding more things to the never-ending to-do list. Once I accepted that the list never ends, and a lot of things are out of my control, I also felt less stressed. I often have to remind myself to take a deep breath. One of my co-workers said it takes well over a year to feel confident and like you know what you are doing. Keep your head up, you can do it! I keep reminding myself that with a year or two of med sure experience, so many doors open up to other nursing careers. Finding something to work towards has helped me as well! Good luck!
  6. newRNinthecity

    Maybe I'm not a bedside nurse?

    I've been working as a new nurse for half a year. Med surg floor, mostly geriatric population. RN to patient ratio is okay, usually 1:5. Work is very physically demanding, the patients require a lot of ADL assistance on top of the medical problems they are hospitalized for. We have techs, but not enough. It seems like there is a high turnover rate for nurses on this unit. Everyone seems stressed out all the time. I can tell that I have grown so much as a new nurse, but I have not really gotten over my new nurse anxiety yet. I like being a nurse, but the floor I am on stresses me out so much. I already feel myself burning out, and I have only been a nurse half a year. I am starting to think bedside nursing may not be for me. I have been questioning this since I started, but I don't know if this is because I am a new nurse or I really am not interested in bedside nursing. I'm more of an introverted person, and while I like talking to patients, I really don't like dealing with peoples family members. I don't like paging doctors, tracking them down, and waiting for them to call back. I rotate between night shifts and day shifts, which kills me. My job affects my quality of life and mental health. I get stressed out about going to work. I really only enjoy being at work maybe one shift in a two week period. Some days I find myself dreaming about changing careers to be a teacher or a physical therapist...or find some 9-5 desk job. I need at least one year of experience for a job that I'm more interested in. I already feel happier when I think about transferring units at the one year mark - just having a countdown to that alleviates some of my stress. While I'm sticking out my year on the floor (still trying to learn as much as I can, grow as a nurse, and have a good attitude), I'm looking into where I might like to go. I have been thinking about trying an Endoscopy Unit or maybe the OR. Both seem to have hours that are a little better, less dealing with family members, and lower patient ratios. Ultimately, I would like to go outpatient in the future. I don't really know much about Endo nursing or OR nursing. I can't leave the hospital until 18 months of work, because I have a new nurse contract. But I also am interested in things like correctional nursing, outpatient transfusion centers, and other non-bedside jobs. Any advice? Any recommendations for nursing fields I might explore?
  7. newRNinthecity

    Anxiety & Nursing

    Thank you for the new perspective, anewsns. I have never thought about how trying to have so much balance can actually be a form of control. I do like my job and am not leaving anytime soon, so i appreciate your post. I also think a good amount of my anxiety will decrease once i get more used to just being a nurse. Thanks!
  8. newRNinthecity

    Anxiety & Nursing

    I'm a few months in to orientation on a Med Surg floor, about to go on my own within the next couple weeks. I have been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and panic attacks since I was a kid (thank you long-standing family history of anxiety). I have heard over and over that the first year of nursing is the hardest, and that it is normal to question your career choice....but I have really been struggling with questioning my career choice. Don't get me wrong, I love being a nurse and helping others. I can recognize my good days and bad days. Being new is a reality shock, but I am learning so much. I feel like I am slowly but surely getting the hang of nursing. The good days are happening more frequently, and I am learning to let a lot of things on the "bad days" roll off my shoulders. I know I still have much to learn, but everyone says I am progressing normally. My hospital is great, my nurse leaders are great, and the staff on my unit is awesome. Everyone on my unit is so kind and helpful to the new nurses. I am not trying to complain about my job situation, because I am very blessed to be where I am. I just have a personal issue with anxiety that has gotten way worse since starting my nursing career. For me, the stress level nursing comes with is huge. I didn't picture rainbows and hand-holding, but I also did not expect this career to be so stressful. I get a lot of anxiety about going to work. For the 12 (more like 13) hours I am on the floor, I feel so wound up. I try to un-wind with a bubble bath or something relaxing when I get home, but working back-to-back 12s usually only allows me time to eat and sleep between shifts. After work, I feel anxious about my actions during the previous shift. I have done talk therapy in the past and I have anxiety medication. I am looking into starting up talk therapy again, and my mom suggested acupressure. I exercise, eat right, take a lot of "me time", pray about it, hangout with friends and family on off days, and try to make the best of my anxious tendencies. My best efforts to maintain balance have not been working since starting this new job. I really do not want to feel so anxious and wound up for the rest of my nursing career. The thought of feeling this way for a long time, stresses me out even more! This is not ideal quality of life for me. I don't like making decisions that can adversely affect a patient's outcome. I don't like not knowing what will happen during the shift. I don't like not being able to follow my organized plan for the day, because x y and z happened. I don't like the long shifts where I feel on-edge for 12 hours. I have a new graduate contract and I want to get at least 2 years experience on my floor if I can. I'm not a quitter and I want a solid 2 years of general nursing experience. But feeling this way is not how I want to spend the rest of my nursing career. Right now, a boring 9-5 office job sounds like a dream. I am learning a lot about myself - like how I think I would much prefer a more predictable schedule. I like nursing, but my current setting is definitely not for me. Any suggestions from other anxious nurses? What are some ways to cope during these first 2 years? Thinking towards the future, what are some alternative nursing settings that are a little more relaxed?
  9. newRNinthecity

    Help a Stressed New Med-Surg Nurse

    Thank you! I seem to be doing alright with getting all the basic things that need to be done, done. I'm not a pro at time-management and prioritizing after a couple months, but I think I'm getting better at that stuff every day. The biggest thing that has been mentioned to me is my timidness and the need for me to be confident. I'm not really a shy person, but the responsibilities of nursing make me nervous. I've never had a job where my actions can greatly affect a persons life before. I also struggle with communicating with patients and sometimes physicians. It is sometimes hard for me to see the overall plan of the patient. Usually I am so busy that there is no time to look at the paper chart with progress notes, then a physician or manager will ask me something about the patient that I don't know the answer too. What does AN stand for?
  10. newRNinthecity

    Help a Stressed New Med-Surg Nurse

    Any advice for a stressed out new grad? I'm a few months into orientation on a med surg floor and I am so stressed out. I have heard that the first year of nursing is hard, but I am already questioning whether or not nursing is the right career for me. I spent 4+ years of school for this, am contracted to over a year at this job (or I owe money), and it is not at all what I expected. I feel like there is no holistic care being given, and like I am not really helping my patients. I thought there would be more "hand holding" and holistic care. I love helping others, so I thought nursing would be a great career for me...but I don't feel like I am doing that. On top of that, the job is stressing me out in all areas of my life. Five patients is a lot, and I feel like all I have time to do are the very basics. My preceptor says I am doing alright, but I need to be more confident when I am on the floor. It is really hard for me when I feel like I don't know much and I am so nervous. I feel like I am on edge for the 13 hours I am there. I try so hard, giving it my all for the entire shift, but feel like it is never good enough. I come home feeling like a horrible nurse, and I have cried on the car ride home a couple times because the day was just so stressful and overwhelming. I already am feeling like I will burn out at this job. Part of me is glad that I am contracted for a certain amount of time, so I have to stick it out. But I also dread sticking out another year if this truly not the job I was meant to do. I think about how stressful work is on my off days. The night before, I can't sleep because I am so stressed out about work the next day. Driving to work, I sometimes feel nauseous. Sometimes at work, I feel so overwhelmed that I don't even know where to start. I just freeze. I really want to be a good nurse, but at the end of the day this is just a job, and I think to myself - why am I so stressed out in all areas of my life because of my job. I need a job to pay rent, buy food, and live life. But this job is so stressful. Any advice?
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