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ThePTNurseGuy

ThePTNurseGuy MSN, APRN, NP

Orthopedic DPT. Family Nurse Practitioner. ER RN.
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ThePTNurseGuy's Latest Activity

  1. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    Haha you crack me up myoglobin. Your last breath? lol cmon man. In all seriousness though I respect that we don’t see eye to eye. Happens all the time. Keep finding your preceptors, and keep pushing for other students to desperately find clinical sites. Just know that others won’t be as fortunate as you to find a preceptor. There are plenty of students who delay graduation or do not finish school because they can’t find people to precept them. Me and @FullGlass both believe that preceptors should come with the tuition. We’re not implying that students MUST use those preceptors. Provide the preceptors, and give them the option of finding their own if they would like. No one is forcing you to do anything. No one is parading on your autonomy or family. I’m just waiting for someone to agree with anything you’ve said. I’ve never met anyone holds your viewpoint, so it’d be nice to hear from someone else who shares the same opinion.
  2. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    No one is denigrating anything. If you’re referencing me, please read what I wrote: I had preceptors to choose from and I chose to find one on my own for a particular clinical. That’s still autonomy to find you’re own preceptor. I chose 3 that were provided to me (they were all great) and found one on my own due to distance. That should be the standard by which we practice. You want to find your own preceptor and do the extra work? Go do you. To even argue that that should be the standard for all schools is absurd.
  3. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    So you agree with the current vetting process, and believe that nursing does it the right way in regards to not including GRE/a standardized test? I do agree with some of the points you made. Dumb dumbs can still get through with these exams. Though, I still think it’s better than nothing and it should be factored in alongside the rest of the requirements.
  4. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    You’re honestly comparing apples and orange man. Discussing the number of schools for medical school and nursing is a night and day comparison. Different variables at play. If you’re telling me that Phoenix and Walden are going to out compete more reputable schools, with standards being raised and with accountability for clinical sites, we’ll just have to agree to disagree. And you’re incorrect about half of nursing schools requiring GRE. That is not a factual statement. There might be a small minority but not a majority. The only consistent GRE requirement for nursing is their PhD programs.
  5. ThePTNurseGuy

    AANP vs. ANCC 2019 & Go w/ AANP

    Thank you! I'd like to make one caveat when deciding between the two certifications: Each organization requires 100 CEUs every 5 years. However, the way that you obtain them is different. For the AANP, you need to obtain CEUs through various approved sponsored courses (ex. Medscape, AANP, ANA, ENA, AACN, etc.). For the ANCC, you also obtain 100 CEUs every 5 years. Unlike the AANP, you can also obtain CEUs in different category systems. For example, you can obtain CEU by completing poster presentations, quality improvement projects, preceptor hours, professional service, etc. If these various activities are something you are interested in, this might be one reason why you might choose ANCC. There are various ways to offset the cost of obtaining CEUs. Again, if you're an AANP member all the CEUs are free. UptoDate, Medscape, CDC, etc. also offer free CEUs for various courses as well.
  6. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    Congrats on almost finishing your PMHNP. I would love to do that down the road if possible. The minute NPs are given the opportunity to attempt and pass the USMLE, PAs will come knocking for the NP exam, and they will pass it with flying colors because it is too easy of an exam. Professions don’t like intermingling, regardless of what that might bring. The PANCE is similar to USMLE 2, but outside of 1 program in the country, there are no PA to physician bridge programs. Better off just going to medical school. You might not agree with everything I said, but I think we both agree there are glaring problems at hand. How we get from point A to point B? I’m all ears. The real question is if all the major stakeholders are listening (which they’re likely not). We know there are problems and now our profession has to come up with reasonable solutions.
  7. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    I like many of the points you made; however, I think it’s BOTH an oversupply AND a distribution problem. At the rate we’re headed, regardless of the demands that are present in certain areas, we’re going well beyond the normal healthy growth rate of a booming profession. Assuming we keep a steady growth rate with no increase in numbers each year (a big assumption to say the least), were looking at half a million NPs by 2025, at the latest. First it was 10,000 graduates. Now it’s 20,000, and according to the data, 30,000 every year. It’s a short term fix with glaring flaws down the road. These schools don’t care about the profession: they care about the $$$. Let’s be proactive and not let our profession becoming a laughingstock among our colleagues.
  8. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    Myoglobin, I really appreciate you sharing your thoughts on this subject. I value what you've shared, and even though we don't agree on everything, I think it has been a fruitful discussion. Do you currently practice as a psych/PMHNP? Or are you still practicing as an RN? I was just wondering what your background is. My understanding is that the CCNE is attempting to "clamp down" on schools that aren't assisting with clinical rotations/finding preceptors. I don't think much has been done so far, but that would make a tremendous impact. Students are paying schools, and yet they are responsible for finding their own preceptors (in some cases, or in many cases, using websites to find and pay for instructors). Shutting down these schools would be amazing, in my opinion. PTs, PAs, PharmDs, MD/DOs, do not need to find their own preceptors; you pay the tuition and it is the school's responsibility to hold their end of the bargain. That's how it should be. I don't think it's a lack of overconfidence that leads NPs to use evidence-based resources: it's desperation and necessity. Many of our colleagues HAVE TO rely on it because they were never taught it (or it wasn't discussed in detail). I'm not sure who these psychiatrists are that you work with, but I do know that the ER docs that I work with frequently use evidence-based resources to make sound decisions in the department. I think this is obviously influenced by age, experience, preferences, etc. We've already heard countless NPs who have confessed and admitted that the education needs to be better. There is no reason that NPs should not have more classes pertaining to differential diagnosis, imaging, pharmacology, etc. These classes would undoubtedly make NPs better at what they do. I don't think having lesser quality education is a valid reason for NPs to be dependent on on these resources. All providers use these resources, the difference is that some of have a better educational foundation. That's an important distinction. At the end of the day, our profession is shooting themselves in the foot by opening up all these new schools. History has already shown what happens to other professions who do the same thing (ex. pharmacy). At least they can lessen the blow to some degree, because they have higher requirements and there are less schools relative to nursing/NPs. There's a gluttony of NPs and the higher nursing institutions need to do something. Fast. Again... -Why not raise the requirements slightly? Why not a 3.5 instead of a 3.0? How about requiring a GRE like every other profession? That would help to eliminate some people from the applicant pool. -If we're going to make a gluttony of NPs, why not improve the education across the board so that they are more prepared for practice? Why not increase the clinical hours required prior to practicing? That would allow for more competent entry-level NPs. -Why not make it a mandate (a legitimate mandate) that NP schools MUST provide clinical sites to their students? This would undoubtedly shut down schools that shouldn't be open to begin with. This, in turn, would condense the number of schools that currently exist, and keep the best schools open. This problem is multi-factorial in nature. I've already opened a discussion topic on why I believe there should only be one certification board available to the public (i.e. AANP for NPs). Having two certification boards hurt our profession; there are no other disciplines that do this. I have never seen a profession with greater variance in skill and knowledge than our own. I’m proud of who we are but absolutely ashamed at the same time. Ignorance is bliss, but when you come from another healthcare profession and reflect on the differences, it’s easy to see all the gaps that truly exist.
  9. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    Haha only a dollar? I’ve already shown you statistics of the increasing number of NPs graduating each year. Compound the new graduates with new programs that are opening in the next couple years. With all of that said: 1. Do you agree with this? Do you believe that the more programs the better? Why is this better? More for profit schools are opening up and it isn’t a good look for the profession. Walden students have to pass the same exam, but that doesn’t mean that they have a good reputation among many recruiters (or healthcare professionals for that matter). Do you go to Walden? I don’t hate the school by any means. I’m just sharing what I’ve heard and learned in person, online, in this forum and with people who went there. If it truly is the best school based on life circumstances I cannot hate on that. 2. You make it sound as if high intellectual IQ is inversely proportional to soft skills and emotional IQ. Granted, there are nurses and physicians who are book smart, but cannot practice well regardless of their GPA and test taking abilities. However, there are plenty who play both ends of the court. You’re comparing yourself as a 4.0 student to someone who has practiced on the floor for multiple years. Let’s compare apples to apples. When all is said done, if the emotional IQ is there, you’re going to take the smarter student on paper. 3. The idea that previous NPs shouldn’t practice without a masters degree isn’t a new issue. Pharmacists and physical therapists who don’t have their doctorate can still practice with their RPh and BSPT. Thats very common in practice, particularly when a profession progresses forward over time. Physicians back in the day could practice without a residency (or with less years).
  10. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    I do not think the average student GPA going to NP school is 3.7. I could be wrong and I have no data to back my claim. However, having a 3.0 GPA requirement is a very low standard, in my opinion. Do you honestly believe that’s a good standard? I can’t tell the Walden’s of the world anything. More power to them. However, I have had friends who went to Walden who were not hired over candidates from other more prominent schools. At the end of the day, HR and other companies will take it into consideration where are numerous applicants. I’m sorry, but all things being equal, they will take NP who went to Vanderbilt or Georgetown. I don’t think intellectual elitism is the answer, but I don’t see how you wouldn’t agree that the standards are too low. There has to be a middle ground and right now we don’t have one.
  11. ThePTNurseGuy

    Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners

    100% agree. My wife is a pharmacist and she graduated just before the bubble burst. She’s been practicing for quite some time, but 7-10 years ago it was the profession to pursue. Unfortunately, the DPT Is heading the same route as pharmacy, NP, etc. (the only difference is that the class sizes are smaller due to labs, simulation, hands on experience etc.). It’s not just Walden and these other schools (although they are part of the problem). The large majority of all nursing schools need to raise their standards.
  12. ThePTNurseGuy

    AANP vs. ANCC 2019 & Go w/ AANP

    Hey guys, I finished a post-master's FNP program earlier in the year, and I thought I'd share my thoughts on why I believe that we, as an NP profession, should go with AANP for certification: 1. The AANPCB is specifically and solely dedicated to upholding, improving, and strengthening the NP profession. While I do respect what the ANCC does for nursing, it encompasses so many different things outside of our specialty: RN certifications, leadership certifications, NP certifications, etc. We should be dedicating our resources to an organization like this. They have been representing us since the early 90s. 2. The AANP initial certification exam fees and the certification renewal are BOTH cheaper than the ANCC. If you are a member of the AANP, the cost of the exam and renewal is even cheaper. Paying higher fees every 5 years can add up, especially when you have funds that need to go elsewhere as well. 3. The AANP continuing education is phenomenal. I've been a part of multiple different organizations, and I genuinely believe that the AANP has some of the best resources available. You can get TONS of great CEUs (pharm, disease management, etc.) on their website. I've looked through ANA's membership benefits and they are nowhere near AANP. 4. In regards to the exam, if you study from Leik and supplement with BoardVitals, you'll be fine! I honestly thought the exam was too easy...considering that people have a lot of autonomy as an NP. Frankly, it should be much harder than it is. The most interesting thing about this year is the fact that ANCC CHANGED their exam, making it more clinically-based and less research-based. Do any of you find that kind of funny, considering that that was what the AANP was all about to begin with? If they're changing the exam to be more clinically-based, they mind as well MERGE the certification exams together. MD/DOs know that having two certification boards is a BAD thing, because that leads to inconsistency between various NPs. Frankly, I believe the ANCC finally realized that it was a bad idea to proctor an exam with 30-35% of the material being research-based. How is that going to vet bad NPs from practicing? Outside of 2015, every year thereafter, the AANP FNP exam has lower/slightly lower pass rates than the ANCC. Part of the reason why this might be is because of the clinical content. 5. To my knowledge, as of right now, there are no states in the entire country that will not accept an AANP certification. I have encountered hospitals that list ANCC; however, when I called to talk to HR and recruiters, they have stated that an equivalent national certifying body is equally as acceptable (i.e. AANP). 6. Believe it or not, there are a large number of people who have told me that they choose ANCC because it has one more letter in the certification. Are we really picking one certification because FNP-BC looks better than FNP-C? We have enough letters behind our name as it is (I honestly just use 'FNP'). I'm sorry, but that isn't a good reason to choose ANCC. While I understand the ANCC has been around longer, and they do bestow magnet status to hospitals, times have changed, and I am unaware of any hospitals that will deny an NP with AANP certification. Again, as it stands, the initial exam fee and renewal fees are less, the money goes towards the biggest NP organization in the country, the CEU courses are fantastic, and the exams are clinically based (as they should be). As a physical therapist, I have been disappointed by the lack of clinical knowledge and skill that certain NPs have. I think one problem lies in the fact that there are two certification boards (among other reasons as well). Now that the ANCC is mirroring AANP, let's make one certification once and for all. There is no reason for two certifying bodies. What are your thoughts on this? J.Lee- DPT, MSN, FNP, CNL, OCS
  13. ThePTNurseGuy

    Online MSN Psychiatric

    Can I contact you about the program? I was considering it because I heard good things but you’re making me second guess if I should.
  14. ThePTNurseGuy

    Standardization of NP Education

    I'd like to weigh in on this, as this is always a topic I am very passionate about. I have my doctorate in physical therapy and my MSN. I am currently obtaining board certification for FNP. Having gone through both curriculums, I can honestly say that PT education is vastly superior to RN/NP education. One area that needs drastic improvement in NP programs is orthopedics/musculoskeletal education. I disagree with one of the earlier posters who said that gross anatomy is not necessary. Anatomy knowledge is lacking for every NP I have seen or worked with. I am not saying they have to be experts, but the knowledge base has to be better. Primary care sees so much ortho/MSK conditions: they need to be better with this specialty. In regards to education, all the fluff has to exit the curriculum. These nursing care plans do not help anybody. I agree with everyone who mentioned that more education is needed beyond the 3Ps. Give students 2-3 pharmacology classes. Allow them to go in depth into each body system. Clinical hours should be bumped to 1000-2000 hours. Also, why do nursing programs ONLY use nurse educators? That makes absolutely no sense to me. They should be bringing in experts from other fields to teach specific areas of content. Bring in MD's/DOs, PTs, OTs, SLPs etc. Is it a pride thing? There is no reason for a nurse to be teaching a pharmacology class if their knowledge of pharmacology is poor.
  15. ThePTNurseGuy

    George Washington University- FNP Fall 2017

    Thanks for responding Dbx! I was just wondering, but do you have an email that I could contact you with? I had some other questions I was hoping to run by you. My email is jamiemlee23@gmail.com Also, could you expound on what you mean when you say it's been difficult to get institutions to approve the clinical rotations? Is there a reason they're saying no even though the preceptors say yes?
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