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Louise Henaut

Louise Henaut

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  1. Louise Henaut

    I Was Fired...for Being Abrasive and Having Attitude

    Thank you so much nurse Beth! This truly means a lot and I will take this as a lesson and experience. As difficult as it is, I’m happy to at least keep working as a nurse regardless of where it is.
  2. Dear Nurse Beth, 

    So my passion all throughout nursing school was to become an ED nurse. I had my preceptorship in the ED and actually ended up becoming good friends with my preceptor. I landed a ED job at a hospital 30-40 min away from my home and while I had never been to this hospital before and it was farther away from another hospital that I had been offered a job at, but I was determined to do ED. My first week was overwhelming however I felt like I was catching on to everything very well. I thought I was getting along with everyone and tried so hard to make friends because this has always been a struggle of mine because I have always been told I have a big personality. Mid second week, my preceptor pulls me aside and tells me I have had complaints that I have an attitude and am argumentative when others try to help. He did not have any specific examples and I was baffled, hurt, and felt so bad that I had made this impression. I cried and apologized to him and he hugged me saying he just wanted to help and he thought I was doing great but to just work on how I speak with others and that it was just something I was going to have to improve on. He even called me after saying I don't want you to take this personally, I want you to take it in, grow from it and keep moving. I walked away from the conversation thinking this was just a hiccup and that I would become more comfortable within a few more weeks and I just needed to find my footing with this group of people. I thought that this meeting was to tell me "hey this is what you need to improve on" and that I would have the rest of my orientation to improve myself. I felt that maybe my anxiety was getting the best of me and making me come off as argumentative with the staff when truly I was just nervous and unable to communicate when I was struggling with a certain task. I worked two more shifts after that and tried my hardest to watch how I was speaking to others. After that conversation though I suddenly was seeing myself never quite fitting in with this team. I was not nearly as excited to be in this ER or even work at this hospital the way I was during my preceptorship. My first day back on my third week, the manager pulled me in her office an hour into my shift and told me my communication skills were not what they were looking for, that I was not a good fit for their team and I was being terminated effective immediately. My heart sank. My old preceptor from school who I had become friends with was shocked that they did not give me more time. I want to be angry and blame them that they were not welcoming enough and being a bit harsh on me, but I want to learn from this experience and acknowledge my mistakes because I know I cannot walk away from this having learned nothing. However, I am suddenly doubting my decision to go into nursing. I am confused that they brought a problem to my attention last week, told me to improve on it and that they would help me, and then fired me the following week for that problem...I thought I would have more time to improve myself but I guess my problems were much bigger than I thought. My skills were not a problem whatsoever and I was learning everything very quickly. I am still trying to understand exactly what I did wrong so I can improve myself, but my confidence is shattered and they frankly did not give me much explanation or examples on why they had this impression that I was "argumentative". The only thing was that my preceptor told me when someone says something to me or tries to help me that I should just smile and say yes okay I understand instead of explaining why I am doing something the way I am doing it. I almost feel like I was fired because I did not brown nose the nurses the way the other new hires/grads were. I'm confused and scared to try to go back to working at a hospital because I am afraid I will make the same mistakes. I feel like my personality tends to make a large and longer lasting impression on others and I can be charismatic and flamboyant, but end up being not everyone’s favorite to be around. I have no filter when in my comfort zone and I will tell you exactly what I think and why however I guess that causes me to come across as abrasive but without the intention of being insulting.

    The orientation was supposed to be 12 weeks and I couldn't even get through 3 weeks. I was supposed to be given one patient in my first 2-3 weeks and was juggling 4-5 in my second week. I scribed and charted a cardiac arrest my second to last day of work perfectly and constantly thanked others when they taught me something. I am trying to figure out if I really just am a person with an attitude problem or maybe this unit and set of people was just not a good fit for me. I'm just lost and disappointed in myself and wishing I could have shown them the best side of myself, but I somehow feel like i wasn't given a chance to do that or to even fix my mistakes. 

    1. Nurse Beth

      Nurse Beth, MSN

      I'm so sorry this was your first experience.

      The fact that they did not give you any specific examples and moved to judgement so quickly could be signs that the management is not experienced or mature. If you worked 12 hr shifts, that means that you worked 6 shifts and were fired on your 7th shift. Only something egregious would warrant immediate termination.

      Too many times I've seen nurses who start out a bit shaky in some way  blossom with support and with time. What a shame to just throw away nurses.

      You describe yourself as explaining yourself (being defensive) when someone said something to you (which I'm taking to mean giving you instruction). You use the term "brown-nosing" to describe other new grads' behaviors. Acknowledging their novice status is not brown-nosing, it's appropriate. This view could be a point of pride on your behalf.

      Here's what I'm sensing, and what you can learn from the situation, because I know you want for this to make some sense. Tone down your big personality. Adopt a humble, learning attitude.

      This is harder for people who are smart, and I have a hunch you are smart, skills-wise. But there's also emotional intelligence, or people-smarts. If the nurses at all thought you were not teachable, that would account for the decision to terminate. Being seen as not teachable is the unforgivable sin in new nurses. Why? Because your co-workers need to know they can trust you with what they consider their patients. 

      You need to move forward from this experience. The worst experiences often become important landmarks in our lives...if we learn from them.

      I, too, had a rough start. I was suspended for a medication error as a new nurse. I know how you feel because I questioned if I should even be a nurse. It was pretty awful. Read about it on my blog I Was Suspended.

      Here's the key- do not quit. You did not come this far to quit, you have a purpose.

      Best wishes, my friend

      Nurse Beth

  3. To try to make a long story short, my passion all throughout nursing school was to become an ED nurse. I had my preceptorship in the ED and actually ended up becoming good friends with my preceptor. i landed a ED job at a hospital 30 min away from my home and while I had never been to this hospital before and it was farther than many other hospitals that I had been offered jobs at I was determined to do ED. My first week was overwhelming however I felt like I was catching on to everything very well. I thought I was getting along with everyone and tried so hard to make friends because this has always been a struggle of mine. Mid second week, my preceptor pulls me aside and tells me I have had complaints that I have an attitude and am argumentative when others try to help. He did not have any specific examples and I was baffled and hurt and felt so bad that I had made this impression. I cried and apologized to him and he hugged me saying he just wanted to help and he thought I was doing great but to just work on how i speak with others and that it was just something i was going to have to improve on. he even called me after saying i dont want you to take this personally i want you to take it in, grow from it and keep moving. i walked away from the conversation thinking this was just a hiccup and that I would become more comfortable within a few more weeks and I just needed to find my footing with this group of people. I worked two more shifts after that and tried my hardest to watch how i was speaking to others. after that conversation though i suddenly was seeing myself never quite fitting in with this team. i was not nearly as excited to be in this ER or even work at this hospital. my first day back on my third week, the manager pulled me an hour into my shift and told me my communication skills were not what they were looking for, that I was not a good fit for their team and i was being terminated effective immediately. my heart sank. i am suddenly doubting my decision to go into nursing and felt horrible that a problem that was brought to my attention last week was not able to be fixed. i thought i would have more time to improve myself but i guess my problems were much bigger than i thought. i am still trying to understand exactly what i did wrong so i can improve myself, but my confidence is shattered. im confused and scared to try to go back to working at a hospital because i am afraid i will make the same mistakes. the orientation was supposed to be 12 weeks and i couldn't even get through 3 weeks. i was supposed to be given one patient in my first 2-3 weeks and was juggling 4-5 in my second week. i scribed and charted a cardiac arrest my second to last day of work perfectly and constantly thanked others when they taught me something. im just lost and disappointed in myself and wishing i could have shown them the best side of myself, but i somehow feel like i wasn't given a chance to do that or to even fix my mistakes.
  4. Louise Henaut

    Ethics of Organ Donation

    yes this helped thank you!!!
  5. Louise Henaut

    Ethics of Organ Donation

    Hey! I have to write a paper on a case study that my professor produced and I chose the one about organ donation because I immediately had a certain opinion on it and knew what I wanted to write about. The only problem is I'm not totally clear on the legal issues pertaining to the issue in the case study and while writing my paper I want to make sure I am making a stance that is legally correct. The section I am confused on is this: "When the OPO representative arrives, she discovers that JD's driver's license has a little heart and "organ donor" stamped on the front. The backside is scuffed so as to make illegible any signature or date that might have been there. He had not signed up for the online state donor registry and has no healthcare directives on file. Yet on the basis of his driver's license, it's determined that JD had authorized donation, a "first person consent," leaving no record of revocation or refusal of authorization." The parents in the case study say they do not want to their son to be an organ donor so basically my paper is on whether or not it is ethical to go through with the organ donation on request of the patients previous decision to be an organ donor or respect the requests of the parents and the lack of further evidence that the patient is a verified organ donor. For me personally, I would follow the decisions of the patient and go through with the organ donation and I know what I want to write about, but I am having a hard time understanding the legality of the situation. I am also confused on what "first person consent" is because upon looking it up it says it means the person signed up to be an organ donor but the case study says "he had not signed up for the online state donor registry". It later says this: "The state's recently revised Uniform Anatomical Gift Act states that, "in the absence of an express, contrary indication by the donor, a person other than the donor is barred from making, amending, or revoking an anatomical gift of a donor's body or a part if the donor made an anatomical gift . . . . " Can someone help put this into easier english lol...Thank you so much!! Any personal opinions is totally welcomed to help form my argument.
  6. Louise Henaut

    Nanda Nursing Diagnosis for PROM

    I am doing a careplan on a patient I had who had premature rupture of membranes. I have to come up with 3 NANDA nursing diagnosis and I am having a lot of trouble doing it. I came up with these but my professor is saying they are wrong. Can you guys give me some suggestions and let me know why these are wrong. Thanks! Risk for Infection r/t amniotic membrane rupture manifested by leakage and water breakage on 1/9/18 Acute Pain r/t contractions of uterus manifested by PROM and monitor showing contractions 1-2 times in morning and 3-4 times in the evening. Anxiety r/t crisis situation manifested by prolonged stay in the hospital.
  7. Louise Henaut

    RN first or BSN first?

    im 17 going on 18 soon. I became a CNA when I was 16 because I decided I wanted to go into nursing. Now I am almost done with high school, I am actually graduating early to go on a service trip to Cambodia to care for HIV positive children (super super excited). So I already applied to three universities to go straight into starting my BSN, but I am starting to think maybe I should just go to my local community college, get my RN in two years, then transfer over to a four year and finish up my BSN in 9 months...Im just not sure which would be the smartest path. Thanks. (PS i want to go into pediatric or oncology nursing)
  8. Louise Henaut

    tattoos and nursing, yay or nay

    I am planning on becoming a nurse, I am already a certified nursing assistant and working as one as well. I am 17, turning 18 in a few days. Long story short, for my birthday I want to get the words "breathe" or something similar (maybe in latin) on my inner arm. I want it because I suffer from depression and have anger issues and I want to see it when I am upset to remember to just take a deep breath and relax. I was wondering, will having this small tattoo be that big of a problem with finding a job? i wear long sleeves under my scrubs already because its cold in the nursing home and I dont see why couldnt do that with a future job as a nurse in hospital. Thanks so much!!
  9. Louise Henaut

    Nervous about becoming a nurse because I don't like being a cna

    Thank you! This made me feel tons better, I really want to work with children, but I'm totally open to other fields. I originally went into this because of pediatrics but then as I got my cna and everything I started to think about an Anesthetist nurse, emergency nurse, neonatal (of course), psychiatric, and for sure wanted to look into oncology (the other reason I got into nursing).
  10. I just became a cna my junior year in high school and I'm gonna try to make this short but I got a job at a nursing home and while I love brining happiness to the faces of these people the work is hard haha. I usually take night shifts because it allows me to get homework and reading done and I only do it a couple nights a week mostly like one shift cause it's just so hard to do it with school. My thing is, before shifts I'm so drained already I'm just like not into going to work I want to help people I'm going on a service trip to Cambodia in feb to work with children and stuff like I want to work with children but will being a nurse be this like idk haha exhausting or will the work of helping people fuel me to get up everyday. I guess what I'm asking is, is the work as satisfying as it seems. I was to wake up every morning happy to go in for work, I don't want to be like "ugh I don't feel like working". That's why I went into this field because I wanted to help people and I felt like it would be the perfect job that doesn't just keep me sitting on my butt all day and I'm doing something productive during my shift. Thanks
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