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verene

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Reputation Activity by verene

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  1. Like
    verene got a reaction from FullGlass, BSN, MSN in Anxious, Confused, and needing help/advice   
    1) Stop. Breathe. It’s clear your anxiety is overwhelming you right now, and that makes everything more difficult. You instructor’s comment that your depression may be interfering with your ability to perform in clinical sounds like a sign to seek help. Do you have a student health center at your program? The university I attended offered free mental health services to students. This may be an option for you or they may be able to refer you somewhere. Getting your anxiety and depression under control WILL help – both can increase negative thinking, decrease confidence, interfere with  your ability to concentrate and retain information, and can overall make life feel far more overwhelming, difficult, and negative than it actually is.  
    2) I would not push yourself overly hard to find a job right this instant, particularly if it is stressing you out, and increasing your anxiety. There are several reasons you might be receiving rejections – some places auto-reject if you are not yet licensed, or it may be something about your resume, or you may be applying to positions which aren’t “new grad positions” which can be a problem in some (but  not all) hospital systems.
    I’d reach out to your career center, or writing center, and/or faculty adviser for some resume and cover letter writing advice, as well as insights on what local employers are looking for before giving up.
    3) I am sure what happened with your preceptor and clinical placement. It may be a case of a bad preceptor, or maybe a bad personality fit, or maybe you were not thinking clearly with your high anxiety and she did stop you from doing something that could have been harmful even if you didn’t realize it at the time.
    It sounds like your school *IS* trying to work with you by offering you options.
    Right now you have the choice to:
    1) Sit down with your instructor and your preceptor and try to work things out. This can be difficult, but if the two of  your are able to work through your communication differences could actually be rewarding. It would also allow you to finish out the program this spring.
    2) The school is able to find you a new preceptor – this may or may not be possible, but the fact the are willing to try is a positive sign that she school is trying to support you. Given the shortage of preceptors, they may not succeed in finding a new placement.
    3) Take a term off, and retake your clinicals later graduating in December. This sounds horrible now, but it may actually be a *good* thing. Give yourself some space, some time to focus on taking care of your mental health, and the ability to come back to clinicals and still graduate once you are in a healthier frame of mind.
    Nursing school can unfortunately evoke anxiety and depression for a number of students. It’s new, it’s stressful, and carries a huge amount of responsibility, and for many students it also taking place at a time of life transition. I do very much think that improving your mental health, be it by pausing and doing some self-care and reflection, or by seeking professional assistance will help you succeed. I also think that at this moment your goals should be 1) taking care of your health, 2) finishing out school, 3) prepping for NCLEX, and 4) worrying about post-graduation employment.
  2. Like
    verene got a reaction from FullGlass, BSN, MSN in Anxious, Confused, and needing help/advice   
    1) Stop. Breathe. It’s clear your anxiety is overwhelming you right now, and that makes everything more difficult. You instructor’s comment that your depression may be interfering with your ability to perform in clinical sounds like a sign to seek help. Do you have a student health center at your program? The university I attended offered free mental health services to students. This may be an option for you or they may be able to refer you somewhere. Getting your anxiety and depression under control WILL help – both can increase negative thinking, decrease confidence, interfere with  your ability to concentrate and retain information, and can overall make life feel far more overwhelming, difficult, and negative than it actually is.  
    2) I would not push yourself overly hard to find a job right this instant, particularly if it is stressing you out, and increasing your anxiety. There are several reasons you might be receiving rejections – some places auto-reject if you are not yet licensed, or it may be something about your resume, or you may be applying to positions which aren’t “new grad positions” which can be a problem in some (but  not all) hospital systems.
    I’d reach out to your career center, or writing center, and/or faculty adviser for some resume and cover letter writing advice, as well as insights on what local employers are looking for before giving up.
    3) I am sure what happened with your preceptor and clinical placement. It may be a case of a bad preceptor, or maybe a bad personality fit, or maybe you were not thinking clearly with your high anxiety and she did stop you from doing something that could have been harmful even if you didn’t realize it at the time.
    It sounds like your school *IS* trying to work with you by offering you options.
    Right now you have the choice to:
    1) Sit down with your instructor and your preceptor and try to work things out. This can be difficult, but if the two of  your are able to work through your communication differences could actually be rewarding. It would also allow you to finish out the program this spring.
    2) The school is able to find you a new preceptor – this may or may not be possible, but the fact the are willing to try is a positive sign that she school is trying to support you. Given the shortage of preceptors, they may not succeed in finding a new placement.
    3) Take a term off, and retake your clinicals later graduating in December. This sounds horrible now, but it may actually be a *good* thing. Give yourself some space, some time to focus on taking care of your mental health, and the ability to come back to clinicals and still graduate once you are in a healthier frame of mind.
    Nursing school can unfortunately evoke anxiety and depression for a number of students. It’s new, it’s stressful, and carries a huge amount of responsibility, and for many students it also taking place at a time of life transition. I do very much think that improving your mental health, be it by pausing and doing some self-care and reflection, or by seeking professional assistance will help you succeed. I also think that at this moment your goals should be 1) taking care of your health, 2) finishing out school, 3) prepping for NCLEX, and 4) worrying about post-graduation employment.
  3. Like
    verene got a reaction from FullGlass, BSN, MSN in Anxious, Confused, and needing help/advice   
    1) Stop. Breathe. It’s clear your anxiety is overwhelming you right now, and that makes everything more difficult. You instructor’s comment that your depression may be interfering with your ability to perform in clinical sounds like a sign to seek help. Do you have a student health center at your program? The university I attended offered free mental health services to students. This may be an option for you or they may be able to refer you somewhere. Getting your anxiety and depression under control WILL help – both can increase negative thinking, decrease confidence, interfere with  your ability to concentrate and retain information, and can overall make life feel far more overwhelming, difficult, and negative than it actually is.  
    2) I would not push yourself overly hard to find a job right this instant, particularly if it is stressing you out, and increasing your anxiety. There are several reasons you might be receiving rejections – some places auto-reject if you are not yet licensed, or it may be something about your resume, or you may be applying to positions which aren’t “new grad positions” which can be a problem in some (but  not all) hospital systems.
    I’d reach out to your career center, or writing center, and/or faculty adviser for some resume and cover letter writing advice, as well as insights on what local employers are looking for before giving up.
    3) I am sure what happened with your preceptor and clinical placement. It may be a case of a bad preceptor, or maybe a bad personality fit, or maybe you were not thinking clearly with your high anxiety and she did stop you from doing something that could have been harmful even if you didn’t realize it at the time.
    It sounds like your school *IS* trying to work with you by offering you options.
    Right now you have the choice to:
    1) Sit down with your instructor and your preceptor and try to work things out. This can be difficult, but if the two of  your are able to work through your communication differences could actually be rewarding. It would also allow you to finish out the program this spring.
    2) The school is able to find you a new preceptor – this may or may not be possible, but the fact the are willing to try is a positive sign that she school is trying to support you. Given the shortage of preceptors, they may not succeed in finding a new placement.
    3) Take a term off, and retake your clinicals later graduating in December. This sounds horrible now, but it may actually be a *good* thing. Give yourself some space, some time to focus on taking care of your mental health, and the ability to come back to clinicals and still graduate once you are in a healthier frame of mind.
    Nursing school can unfortunately evoke anxiety and depression for a number of students. It’s new, it’s stressful, and carries a huge amount of responsibility, and for many students it also taking place at a time of life transition. I do very much think that improving your mental health, be it by pausing and doing some self-care and reflection, or by seeking professional assistance will help you succeed. I also think that at this moment your goals should be 1) taking care of your health, 2) finishing out school, 3) prepping for NCLEX, and 4) worrying about post-graduation employment.
  4. Like
    verene got a reaction from brownbook in CE boundaries with psychiatry patients   
    Apna.org may have something
    Is there something specific you are having difficulties with in practice in terms of maintaining boundaries?
     
     
  5. Like
    verene reacted to FolksBtrippin in Any other INFJ Nurses?   
    I am an ENFP and a Myers Briggs nerd. I think most of what you are describing is common to the NF personality types. And you are introverted which means you are more likely to feel drained when stressed. I tend to feel overwhelmed or agitated.
     It's a good thing you are doing work that matches your values, don't change that. We need that. We can't get all our satisfaction from money. And we can't be satisfied when something is too easy.
    We NFs need to have a self care regimen. It helps to make a list of things that refresh you. If you don't  know, try some out like yoga, reading, music, massage, walk outside, pets and decide which ones work the best. 
    Then insert some easy ones into your after work routine. Listen to relaxing or energizing music on the way home for example. If you are feeling drained do the bigger ones, like a 1 hour yoga video. 
    It took me a long time to understand myself well, and I didnt even have a clue on how to take care of myself until I was 30. 
    I think if you are young and just starting to figure this stuff out, you are doing really well. In time, you will develop endurance. Our culture  teaches us that aging is bad, but we really do get better with age and wisdom. We grow as people way past our 20s, and just keep getting smarter and better into our 30s, 40s, 50s, and onward.
  6. Like
    verene got a reaction from Silver_Rik in CNA to RN   
    I don't know that it makes the process of becoming an RN any quicker to become a CNA first (as many states allow one to sit the CNA certification exam after the first term or two of nursing school), however it can be a beneficial way to get one's foot in the healthcare door,  make some money, and learn some of the very basic skills associated with nursing care. A few programs are starting to require that prospective students have completed CNA certification at time of admission or offer extra admissions points for having certification (though this is certainly not universal), so becoming one may be beneficial to gaining admission.
    Personally, as someone who wasn't 100% certain I wanted to become an RN, I found becoming a CNA a good stepping stone, and valuable informatively on a personal level to my decision making.
  7. Like
    verene got a reaction from Delcon in Pre Nursing looking for ABSN program - low gpa   
    Unfortunately you will likely struggle in finding an ABSN program that will accept you with a GPA that low. I don't say this to be mean, but to be realistic. Most ABSN programs require a minimum 3.0 GPA to be considered, and the actual acceptance GPA may be higher, much higher (average incoming gpa in my cohort was a 3.85). This is due to the fact that ABSN programs are accelerated and rigorous and want to see that you already have strong study skills and a history of academic success - as even those with previous success can find grades dropping in nursing school.
    Your best bet is probably 1) retaking any courses that are pre-reqs for which your received a low grade and 2) applying to ADN or BSN programs that only look at pre-req grades and test score (many of the community college ADN programs only care about pre-req grades and TEAS/HESI scores, and don't care about previous degree gpa).
  8. Like
    verene got a reaction from Silver_Rik in CNA to RN   
    I don't know that it makes the process of becoming an RN any quicker to become a CNA first (as many states allow one to sit the CNA certification exam after the first term or two of nursing school), however it can be a beneficial way to get one's foot in the healthcare door,  make some money, and learn some of the very basic skills associated with nursing care. A few programs are starting to require that prospective students have completed CNA certification at time of admission or offer extra admissions points for having certification (though this is certainly not universal), so becoming one may be beneficial to gaining admission.
    Personally, as someone who wasn't 100% certain I wanted to become an RN, I found becoming a CNA a good stepping stone, and valuable informatively on a personal level to my decision making.
  9. Like
    verene got a reaction from Silver_Rik in CNA to RN   
    I don't know that it makes the process of becoming an RN any quicker to become a CNA first (as many states allow one to sit the CNA certification exam after the first term or two of nursing school), however it can be a beneficial way to get one's foot in the healthcare door,  make some money, and learn some of the very basic skills associated with nursing care. A few programs are starting to require that prospective students have completed CNA certification at time of admission or offer extra admissions points for having certification (though this is certainly not universal), so becoming one may be beneficial to gaining admission.
    Personally, as someone who wasn't 100% certain I wanted to become an RN, I found becoming a CNA a good stepping stone, and valuable informatively on a personal level to my decision making.
  10. Like
    verene got a reaction from Silver_Rik in CNA to RN   
    I don't know that it makes the process of becoming an RN any quicker to become a CNA first (as many states allow one to sit the CNA certification exam after the first term or two of nursing school), however it can be a beneficial way to get one's foot in the healthcare door,  make some money, and learn some of the very basic skills associated with nursing care. A few programs are starting to require that prospective students have completed CNA certification at time of admission or offer extra admissions points for having certification (though this is certainly not universal), so becoming one may be beneficial to gaining admission.
    Personally, as someone who wasn't 100% certain I wanted to become an RN, I found becoming a CNA a good stepping stone, and valuable informatively on a personal level to my decision making.
  11. Like
    verene got a reaction from Delcon in Pre Nursing looking for ABSN program - low gpa   
    Unfortunately you will likely struggle in finding an ABSN program that will accept you with a GPA that low. I don't say this to be mean, but to be realistic. Most ABSN programs require a minimum 3.0 GPA to be considered, and the actual acceptance GPA may be higher, much higher (average incoming gpa in my cohort was a 3.85). This is due to the fact that ABSN programs are accelerated and rigorous and want to see that you already have strong study skills and a history of academic success - as even those with previous success can find grades dropping in nursing school.
    Your best bet is probably 1) retaking any courses that are pre-reqs for which your received a low grade and 2) applying to ADN or BSN programs that only look at pre-req grades and test score (many of the community college ADN programs only care about pre-req grades and TEAS/HESI scores, and don't care about previous degree gpa).
  12. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  13. Like
    verene reacted to umbdude, BSN, RN in What's the Most Common Reason for a Patient to be Readmitted on a Psych Floor?   
    In my setting, most common reasons are: homelessness, substance relapse or detox, psychosocial stressors, symptom decompensation, and some malingering. 
  14. Like
    verene reacted to Kallie3006, ADN in Juggling Multiple PRN Jobs   
    I have been working PRN for the last 5 years and would not change it.  I am currently PRN contract for one facility so I have committed to at least 3 shifts a week but I pick my schedule.  While being contract I am in the same rotation as FT and PT staff in regards to floating and being put on call.  As long as I am scheduled 3 shifts I am fulfilling my end even if I do get canceled.  I also work PRN doing home infusions, teaching and injection training.  I also have the ability to make my schedule for that position as well and I love the change that comes with it. 
    If you are working at least full-time hours or more I would think it would be financially more sound to only have one PRN position because you would be able to get OT from that job.
    If you do work more than one or multiple departments I would suggest a calendar app to keep everything straight so you don't double book shifts. I use Cozi, but this allows me to input my kid's dance and gym classes and competitions, my work schedule as well as my husbands and they are all linked together with a family account, so everyone is able to see what is going on each day.  Another good app is Jorte if you don't need the calendars to be able to link to multiple devices. 
    Your stipulations to the PRN agreement is dependent on the facility so it would be hard to state whether you just need to be available on a day or scheduled, so I would inquire that information with the facility of interest.      
  15. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  16. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  17. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  18. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  19. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  20. Like
    verene got a reaction from FolksBtrippin in Does your school's coursework include anything on educating the students about the increased risk of substance abuse for nurses?   
    The BON came and spoke to our cohort at one point about a variety of topics and included some information on risk of substance use and the programs available in the state for healthcare providers and BON process should one end up voluntarily or involuntarily in substance use treatment.
  21. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  22. Like
    verene got a reaction from southern rn in Vaccination for clinical   
    Being up-to-date on vaccines is a requirement of nursing schools because it is a requirement of healthcare centers/hospitals/clinical sites.  Some hospitals/clinical sites allow you to opt out of flu shots if you wear a mask for the whole flu season, there are not usually exceptions to other vaccines. 
    When it comes vaccines you will have to either accept them for nursing school (and employment) or realize that perhaps working in health care is not compatible with your personal beliefs.
  23. Like
    verene reacted to Horseshoe in Unvaccinated Boy in Oregon gets Tetanus   
    Well, it wasn't a wake up call to his own parents, who refused the second tetanus vaccine. If parents who have witnessed this kind of suffering with their own eyes don't wake up, I'm not holding my breath about any of the other anti-vax nutcases.
    There has been a hint that this may also become a political issue, with one party beginning to support the breakdown of vaccine requirements.
  24. Like
    verene reacted to Mergirlc in Vaccination for clinical   
    I doubt there's any way to get around this.  I recall even when  I applied to volunteer at the local children's hospital, I had to have proof of vaccinations or titer results.  As somebody previously mentioned, you also had to get the flu shot every year and if you didn't, you had to sit out flu season.  For nurses, they got to mask up but since we were volunteers, you just couldn't come in.
  25. Like
    verene reacted to Jenn98 in Vaccination for clinical   
    The only way to not get vaccinated is to run titers and prove you already have the antibodies. I chose to spend the extra money and do this for varicella, mumps, measles, and rubella, even though it would have been cheaper to just get re-vaccinated. But, you still have to get anything you haven’t had, and have some re-boostered. I had to have a hep b series and TDaP. Also, you will be required to have your annual influenza vaccine. Clinical sites are generally very strict regarding these requirements. 
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