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Forest2

Forest2

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Forest2's Latest Activity

  1. Recently I was reading about bait and switch during preliminary interviews. I then recalled the worst interview torture that I was ever subjected to. It was a few years back and I had applied for a nurse educator position in a 74 bed hospital. I was greeted by 2-3 interviewers and we were located in a small conference room. There were probably 8 total chairs in there. During the interview a couple more people came in, then in a few minutes a few more came in, till at one point people were standing. At that time someone mentioned that we would be moving to a larger room. I was escorted to a very large class room, more like an auditorium really. I sat and waited in front of the class at a small table and chair. As I waited more and more and more people came in, department heads, assistants of department heads, managers, secretarial staff, nurse residents, trainees, every single member of the HR department. Finally the crowd was all settled in and introductions began. Each person introduced themselves and what their position was. No way was I going to remember who all these people were. I'd say there were about 40-50 people there. I mean really? So they start hammering me with questions. Why do you think you should get this job? What makes you qualified? Talk about mob mentality. I felt like I was on the witness stand being drilled by a team of lawyers. There were a couple of mean ones in there too, staring at me as if I were a creepy little bug that they wanted to squash. The one I remember most was the nurse manager of the OR who would roll her eyes. Now, I wish I would have gotten up and walked out leaving them there scratching their heads. At one point, I quipped, " wow, it looks like everyone is here, Who is running the hospital?" I got several laughs about it. The HR folks told me that they invited everyone who wanted to come (it was an open type of torture for anybody to join in on I guess). Yes, and this was the first interview. I decided I would never work at that hospital. They didn't call me back anyway but I don't think it would have mattered. I was ready to tell them that their practices were unwarranted and unfair and like the Spanish Inquisition. If they treated potential employees that way I couldn't imagine how they treated actual employees. So... Tell me about your nightmare interview experience.
  2. Forest2

    The Healthy Side of Disgust

    Not too much bothers me, but if it is nasty and has a terrible and strong odor, I just pop a mint in my mouth and all is well. On the other hand, I went to see a female patient of mine and her son was there, it was hot and he had shorts on and mind you, he was not what you would call a prime specimen. As he sat on the couch he let his testicles hang out the sides of his shorts and just grinned at me, Yup, I was disgusted.
  3. Forest2

    What is it like to work in a good hospital?

    When I first read this my mind skipped over "of expectations" and I did a double take/read.
  4. Forest2

    What is it like to work in a good hospital?

    That's cute.
  5. Forest2

    let go from job

    When you work in such close proximity and in a small group it is very important for everyone to jell together. There are just some people that don't mix well. It's not that there is anything wrong with anyone, that is just the way it is. My thoughts on the matter is that what they said was probably true, you just didn't fit in with that one person who held the key. I think that is what happened, he just didn't like you much. You probably are not the first person that he didn't care for. They probably couldn't even pinpoint what it was. It is unfortunate that employers aren't more sensitive when they need to tell someone goodbye. Take a deep breath, shake it off and carry on. You'll do fine, good luck.
  6. Forest2

    Innumeracy

    150 tabs divided by 3 a day = ? How many days? LOL, sorry it's just funny.
  7. Forest2

    Scared to leave nursing

    Wow, you are going to be a Nurse Shark? (pun intended) I think that is amazing! Way to go!
  8. Forest2

    Scared to leave nursing

    Oh my gosh, so funny and true. You don't have to leave to do something else. Do the other thing AND keep your license up to date. I knew a nurse who volunteered 2 weeks a year on a Native American Reservation and she would come back so happy! I have decided that todays version of bedside nursing is not for me. I left nursing for about a year. I feel rejuvenated.
  9. Forest2

    Does the Doctor-Nurse Game Still Exist?

    Your one female intensivists needs a smart crusty old nurse to tell her, "You need to stop that, it's not helpful." Stop what? YOU KNOW.
  10. Forest2

    Does the Doctor-Nurse Game Still Exist?

    Hey, you aren't the only one. Have I got stories! Yes, we arose from the chairs so the doctors could sit, as I was told, "their time is more precious than ours", then again, they came to the hospital in the morning, went to the office, came back to the hospital and did surgeries and delivered babies. Patients called the doctors at home if the office was not open. The days of the old doctors who did it all. They were doctors 24/7 and we were nurses 8 hours a day. Yes, I also remember when our aides were grandfathered in as CNA's if they had one year experience, if they didn't they had to take classes.
  11. Forest2

    Nursing job is making me sick ?

    I believe that as an LPN the RN co-signs your orders and does the care planning bit. Not sure about your location, but that was one reason the agency where I was decided not to use LPN's and go with all RN's. I am also not sure if an LPN can do an OASIS or not, probably not. And I am sure you won't be able to do admissions, you will get them handed off to you after the admit. I have seen an agency hire new nurses that had no experience and it was iffy. I mean there are places where you work inpatient and they put you out there, but in home care I mean you are truly OUT THERE ALONE. It takes some pretty good size kahoonas (excuse the spelling) to be able to do. I worked in some remote locations and thought if I disappeared no one would find my body. LOL. Some places I had to use my inner senses to decide if it was safe or not and how to extract myself if I didn't like what the little voice was telling me. You will fine tune your investigative skills when talking with patients too. I had 9 years nursing before I went in. Stayed for 20, it was great but I got tired of being on call. If you think you won't save lives you are wrong. I saved plenty. Often it was keeping people from accidentally killing themselves. They just need our help so bad. How many years do you need? It depends on the person. How is your assertiveness and self-confidence? A nurse can have 30 years experience but if there a lack of ability to lead or work autonomously they won't be able to do it. I have done hospital work( about 5 yrs). It is task oriented, passing meds, doing treatments (and assessments if you have time) and putting out fires. In home care you lead, you plan, you are the one who puts it all together. Now, that being said, being an LPN takes some of the responsibility away. Hope I have been of help. If you have any more questions ask away.
  12. Forest2

    Nursing job is making me sick ?

    If you have the same patients routinely it makes it much easier. You may have to split up your 3 -12 hour shifts across the week if the agency allows. They may want you to do 4-10's. If vents and trachs make you nervous there is ample online training available. You can readily do CEU's online to study up But, no doubt you will learn a massive amount. You will learn a lot as you will be responsible for educating patients and to be able to teach it you must know it. I spent quality time learning things so that I could transfer that knowledge to my patients. For me, teaching patients and their caregivers how to take care of themselves, how to manage their diseases and conditions was the part of the job I loved the most. The ignorance of lay people will astound you. That is why the job can be so rewarding because you help them learn things they didn't know that they didn't know.
  13. Forest2

    Ohio Hospital Fires 23 After Fentanyl Overdose Deaths

    Sounds like this doctor believed in euthanasia for dying patients who have had life-saving measures removed. Just because they weren't trying to save their lives doesn't mean you can murder them. I definitely blame administration for being blind, purposefully or not.
  14. Forest2

    Ohio Hospital Fires 23 After Fentanyl Overdose Deaths

    Ignorance is not an excuse, at least that is what I am being told.
  15. Forest2

    Does the Doctor-Nurse Game Still Exist?

    What is my experience with the nurse/doctor game? I never knew it had a name for one thing. However, I have pretty much seen it all, from collaboration, to nurses and doctors becoming real friends, to practical enemies. I could write a 1000 page book. I believe the relationship has a lot of basis in the abilities of each prospective nurse or doctor. For instance, if you have an inexperienced nurse and a very experienced doctor, the physician may be impatient or have less respect for the nurse. This also goes the other way around. I believe the wiser you become and the more experienced you are the better you are able to manage the nurse/doctor relationship. Sure, there is uneven power at a certain level. But, I am not afraid to professionally tell a doctor what I think or ask them what they think. In addition, We should consider culture in the relationship. Foreign physicians are not uncommon and their culture may categorize women or nurses into subservient roles. I knew a physician whose wife ran his bath for him as part of her role. I have so many interesting and amusing stories. Such as, a local physician and a local nurse who worked together for 20 years and the doctor was being an A-_ _ _. She gave him the finger and said, F---- Y---.( They made up ). I have heard a nurse telling a physician that he was being a "brat". I have seen doctors throw things, "get me somebody who knows what the H---- they are doing!". This is a huge topic and much can be said about it. Overall, I feel that physicians value nurses, just as nurses value aides. I can't do my job without my aides and physicians can't do their jobs without us. We are important.
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