Jump to content
2019 Nursing Salary Survey Read more... ×

pmabraham BSN, RN

BSN, RN - Hospice RN Case Manager

Follower of Jesus • BSN, RN serving others as a Hospice RN Case Manager • Lifelong Learner

Reputation Activity by pmabraham

Reactions Received

Like 4
Thanks 1

  1. Thanks
    pmabraham, BSN, RN got a reaction from AngelDivina in Pearson Vue Trick did NOT work for me and I PASSED! 2017   
    I had the same problem where the trick didn't work though I did pass.
  2. Like
    pmabraham, BSN, RN got a reaction from iSurvivor in Capella RN-BSN-MSN flexpath experience?   
    My BSN with Capella via their FlexPath program took a few days over 6 months, and yes, I was (and still am) working full time.
  3. Like
    pmabraham, BSN, RN got a reaction from araew2129 in Tips for first semester?   
    1. Rose's opening response is priceless. Do learn how you learn best.
    2. If you are not normally an extremely organized person, start learning how to organize. Set up a planning system (paper, electronic, mixture of both, etc.) that will work for you.
    3. Try to get a copy of each class's syllabus and/or reading list in advance of the class start date. When you get it (early or first class date), be sure to carefully review each page. Pay special attention to what must be done when, and plan for it. Do be careful in your review of #3 as sometimes there is only a few words or a sentence about ATI, drug cards / medication sheets, etc. that are often missed; don't miss them. Also take note of names and phone numbers; and set them up in your contact list.
    4. Don't wait until the start of the clinical day (or the night before) to find out where you should be at what time et al. Make sure you know well in advance of where to go, what you are expected to wear, and what you need to have with you. Most nursing programs view on time as being 15 minutes early. BTW, don't get caught up in assuming there will be proper parking near the clinical site; find that out also in advance of where you should park.
    5. Do you extreme best to never ever fall behind on your readings. Cuesta College :: Students :: SQ4R still works; but you'll need to adapt it to your text book and try to focus over time (it is very hard the 1st semester, but gets easier each semester) on what a nurse would need to know (sadly, text books have fluff).
    6. Practice NCLEX style questions on a regular basis. Whether you do 10 a day or 50 on weekends, that's up to you. But get in the habit. Do try to find NCLEX questions related to the material you are studying. Davis Q&A success series is good as well as Lippincott Q&A for the NCLEX RN. Online, nurselabs.com has good ones.
    7. As part of #2 above, make sure you plan practice time for your skills.
    8. Get to know (whether friends or at least acquaintances) every nursing student you encounter. The upper classmates can be excellent resources for study tools et al.
    9. On any exam or quiz for which you don't get a score you are happy with, promptly see your professor(s). Do not wait until x quizzes or exams go by to then start asking for help. Ask help FIRST from your professors.
  4. Like
    pmabraham, BSN, RN got a reaction from araew2129 in Tips for first semester?   
    1. Rose's opening response is priceless. Do learn how you learn best.
    2. If you are not normally an extremely organized person, start learning how to organize. Set up a planning system (paper, electronic, mixture of both, etc.) that will work for you.
    3. Try to get a copy of each class's syllabus and/or reading list in advance of the class start date. When you get it (early or first class date), be sure to carefully review each page. Pay special attention to what must be done when, and plan for it. Do be careful in your review of #3 as sometimes there is only a few words or a sentence about ATI, drug cards / medication sheets, etc. that are often missed; don't miss them. Also take note of names and phone numbers; and set them up in your contact list.
    4. Don't wait until the start of the clinical day (or the night before) to find out where you should be at what time et al. Make sure you know well in advance of where to go, what you are expected to wear, and what you need to have with you. Most nursing programs view on time as being 15 minutes early. BTW, don't get caught up in assuming there will be proper parking near the clinical site; find that out also in advance of where you should park.
    5. Do you extreme best to never ever fall behind on your readings. Cuesta College :: Students :: SQ4R still works; but you'll need to adapt it to your text book and try to focus over time (it is very hard the 1st semester, but gets easier each semester) on what a nurse would need to know (sadly, text books have fluff).
    6. Practice NCLEX style questions on a regular basis. Whether you do 10 a day or 50 on weekends, that's up to you. But get in the habit. Do try to find NCLEX questions related to the material you are studying. Davis Q&A success series is good as well as Lippincott Q&A for the NCLEX RN. Online, nurselabs.com has good ones.
    7. As part of #2 above, make sure you plan practice time for your skills.
    8. Get to know (whether friends or at least acquaintances) every nursing student you encounter. The upper classmates can be excellent resources for study tools et al.
    9. On any exam or quiz for which you don't get a score you are happy with, promptly see your professor(s). Do not wait until x quizzes or exams go by to then start asking for help. Ask help FIRST from your professors.
  5. Like
    pmabraham, BSN, RN got a reaction from njgrl622 in New grad, start in hospice?   
    As someone with just 1.5 years hospital experience, I would recommend it would be ok to start off as a new grad in hospice with the right company/agency. I have friends that started right out of nursing school in hospice and they are fine.
    Hospital nurses focus on curring, lack the autonomy of most hospice nurses, and working in the hospital doesn't guarantee any experience that will apply to hospice. In relation to "you are expected to know," families often don't have a healthcare background, and they just want their loved one comfortable. Therefore, you don't have to be able to know in advance what might happen -- because it may NEVER happen, you just deal with symptoms that are presenting in an effort to ensure comfort. It's a completely different ball game (so to speak) than hospital nursing.
    Thank you.
×