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tinyRN72

tinyRN72 BSN

Cardiovascular Stepdown
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Melissa Gallant has been an RN for over 6 years. She has worked in cardiovascular step-down for the majority of her career. As a travel nurse, she also has experience with med/surg, tele, ortho, float pool, and med oncology. Melissa is also the co-owner of https://etheriawellness.com/ where she offers nursing consultations, health and wellness coaching, meditation and mindfulness classes as well as other health-related classes.  

tinyRN72's Latest Activity

  1. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    Yes, you can plan your day that way if you want.... But for an admit you would be there for 2 hours. Then your day in the field is just longer. I do document as much as I can in the home, but if I have too many patients, it isn't practical. Sometimes you choose to do it at home where you want be interrupted as much. Most times there just isn't time to spend so much time at one home.
  2. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    HH doesn't work that way unfortunately. I am paid by the visit and things have to be done. If I have time to call MDs between visits then it have to do it at the end of the day. Some days are light and I can, but others not. Also reviewing charts has to be done sometime before the visit... So before starting or the night before. This is just the nature of the beast and the only way to reduce it is see less people, which equals less pay, which isn't an option. More time to get my business going is the reason for returning to hospital work.
  3. tinyRN72

    Anxious About Clinicals

    I see that you have gotten a lot of advice from fellow students and that is great! But I thought that you might want to hear from an experienced nurse too. First - I LOVE having students assigned to my patients. I love teaching and sharing tips and tricks of the trade to young minds. There are many nurses who will be happy to have an extra set of hands. My advice is to be available and willing to help. Let your nurse know that you want to do anything and everything that you are allowed to do - also that you want to watch anything that you are not allowed to actually do hands on. They will appreciate your desire to learn. Be happy if they ask you help by being a runner. It may not be your top priority to run for towels or get water for patients, but these little things ready help the nurse and having a good attitude about it will take you a long way in the eyes of the nurses on the floor. We always have students that we look forward to working with because they are helpful and make our day better - be one of those students and you will be treated better and learn more. On the down side, some nurses just don't like working with students. Don't worry about them. It isn't personal - they simply don't appreciate how much you can assist them while you are there. In this case, just ask questions of your clinical instructor instead of the nurse when possible. It's ok to let your instructor know that a nurse isn't particularly warm to students. This helps them with planning future assignments because they want you to have a good experience. If you find those nurses who enjoy students, try to get assigned to their patients if possible. Try not to interrupt if the nurse is busy. If they are on a computer, don't walk up and just start talking. Wait for them to signal they are ready to listen to you. Also, don't interrupt them while pulling meds, let them finish then speak to them. Remember to ask often "how can I help you?" I wish you the best of luck! It is not going to be as bad as you think it is - I promise!
  4. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    Well, with the current job offer, I asked for ER, ICU, and dialysis.... They would not train me for any. I applied for a CM job with Humana, but after getting a computerized text prescreening, I have not pursued further. The hours are aweful... And seriously - a computer texting me questions? Ugh
  5. tinyRN72

    Job Flip-Flopping: When Will I Find My Place?

    Sadly that really is the truth.
  6. I have never worked in a rehab, nor have I had a management role in nursing. I was in management for years before nursing. I feel comfortable taking a supervisor role, but I really don't know what to expect. Can anyone offer insight about this type of job? The fact that it is in a nursing home leaves me uncertain about the job specifics. Thank you in advance!
  7. My career has been marked by one main constant - change! Can change really be constant? Read my story and decide for yourself. I started my career as a home health nurse. I was really happy with it for a while because I got to spend one-on-one time with my patient and I made (what I considered at the time) good money. But after about a year, I was looking for something else. Home health nursing was wearing me and my car out. I was putting about 600 miles on my car every week and I was working about 80 hours a day. My poor husband told me, "I feel like I live alone because you are either at work or working at home." And he was right! I had a huge territory, and I saw 7-10 patients a day. I was constantly being asked to pick up extra work because there were not enough RNs. This got old, and besides, I became a nurse to work in a hospital. This led me to my second job: working on a cardiac step-down unit. I loved this too! My job was 10 minutes from home, I didn't have to bring home any paperwork or documentation, and (what a privilege!) I was given health insurance and paid time off. I thought I was in heaven (again). So what happened? I was working with some really snooty nurses who didn't like new people at all, it seemed. This made me feel sort of lonely for 36 hours a week, and my pay actually went down. My husband and I had always wanted to do travel nursing, so I got signed up with an agency and off we went! That was a really fun time in life, filled with so many adventures, good pay and more choices. Travel nursing is full of change: a new hospital every 13 weeks. This was good for me. I guess I'm sort of gypsy at heart. I loved moving around all the time. I loved the change. Every new place was a new start and by the time I started being temperamental about the hospital, it was time to go and start over again. What could possibly go wrong, you ask? Well, living in an RV or a hotel most of the time started feeling cramped. I missed my (grown) kids because I was away from home so much of the time, and about this time I was also feeling really burned out in hospitals. To give myself a new change, I decided to go back to home health. Here is my current problem. Working in home health requires being available 5 days a week to make enough money. I thought it would be a good trade-off for the reduced stress compared to the stress level I was feeling hospitals. But it has been less than 6 months and already I am tired of working 12 hour days 5 days a week. I am tired of having to call doctor's offices on my days off. I am tired of working all day in the field only to come home and have to document, answer emails, call patients to set up my next day, and I'm tired of being tired. I miss having 4 days off every week. Yes, I have applied and been offered another hospital job. Will this make me happy this time? I sure do hope so. Before the comments start - I have considered other types of nursing. I have looked at and applied to many non-hospital and home health jobs. Unfortunately, I have not been able to get an interview for a single one. Additionally, I really do love 3-12s, and I have only seen that in hospitals. I realize that I am going to have to accept the fact that no job is going to be perfect. I think I've done that. I hope I've done that. If I am to be 100% honest here, I know that working for myself is the only answer that is going to make me feel satisfied in the long run... and I am working on it
  8. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Thanks! And wow! I always believed my recruiter when they said that you had to travel at least 50 miles. It never really made sense to me from a "double expenses" stand point. Thanks for all the info and clarification.
  9. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    Great advice, NedRN. It's not worth it if you get audited!
  10. tinyRN72

    Do you have a side hustle?

    I guess the question for me would be "just in case" what? Are you worried that you won't like the job? Won't pass the NCLEX? Won't do well and get let go? As a new grad all of these can go through your mind. Nothing wrong with hanging on to your old job until you feel secure about your nursing job, but you will be learning a lot and adjusting to 12 hour shifts... It might feel like a lot, but if keeping both is too much, you can always completely leave the old job. Do what feels right to you, but most likely, you do fine, get your license and things will be ok in the new job. Feeling secure is important, so try it if it helps you feel better.
  11. tinyRN72

    Do you have a side hustle?

    Side hustle should be my middle name! About 10 years ago I started making candles. Then I added soap and bath and body products. I found out that I don't have the requirements to legally make body products from home, so I just do that for family now. While I still have a full time job, my hubby and I started a holistic wellness center about 3 months ago. I sell my soap, offer nursing consultation, do meditation and my husband is a life coach and teaches mindfulness. Hopefully this side hustle will be the main hustle soon!
  12. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Every company is a bit different, so make sure that you understand the point system and how they reimburse for your mileage. Good luck in your new job!
  13. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Yes and yes! My office tells them that in their welcome call, but very few comply. In this area 90% have pets. Many pits, which are ok most of the time. Of course my office has 100% success rate in making initial contact and confirming that the PCP will sign orders, but then the nurses can't contact the patient by phone, drive bys are hit and miss, some are not home yet, and some PCPs refuse to sign orders. What does that tell you? Lol
  14. tinyRN72

    Travel Nursing is Always an Adventure

    I have worked with other travel nurses who took the whole family. These two nurses had RVs, their spouse took care of the kids and they home schooled. It can be done. Those nurses made it a lifestyle. There are travel home health jobs too. When I travel my spouse comes with me, but he is an independent computer programmer, so he just needed internet to work. I would say that 1) you need to make sure the contract would pay enough to cover your expenses or 2) if your spouse is a nurse you need to negotiate opposite work days. It might be a challenge to find short term child care. Those would be the things I would think about when traveling with kids. Traveling is a great way to find a new place to live, but also keep in mind that you most likely won't be able to take a contract and then stay on permanently. There are non compete clauses in the contract. While it's not impossible, the hospital will need to pay the agency a large sum to keep you. The other options include getting a permanent job in a different hospital in the area you like, or leaving the one you like for a year then going back as an employee. I hope this helped.
  15. tinyRN72

    A Day in the Life of a Home Health Nurse

    Thanks!
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