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TriciaJ RN

Registered User

Reputation Activity by TriciaJ

Reactions Given

Like 1508
Thanks 19
Haha 36
Disagree 6

Reactions Received

Like 1024
Thanks 16
Haha 58
Disagree 2
Sad 2

  1. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Pyxis Problems   
    1.  Elvis impersonator 2.  Guy with his scrub top backwards 3. Someone taking out vecuronium 4.  Wormy apple 5. Davey ('nuff said).  Can't find the other 3 - wait - is one of them a manager actually looking after patients?
     
  2. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Sue Damonas, BSN in Pyxis Problems   
    My last workplace (ambulatory care) had a different brand machine.  It wasn't anal; it was downright passive aggressive.  It would pretend it never saw your fingerprint before.  The process to actually get one of its precious meds out of it was quite elaborate.  If the multiple steps weren't completed just so, you had to start over.
    Sometimes it would decide it needed to reboot itself, but only if the clinic was especially busy that day.  We learned never to keep epi or other emergency meds in it.
    That machine would not have lasted a week on a med-surg floor.  Someone would have taken a baseball bat to it.  Probably me.
  3. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Krispy Kritter in Job change - anxiety   
    I say go for it.  Opportunities like that don't come around every day.  Yes, there may be a downside but if you can work regular hours for the same pay, why would you turn it down?
    There may be some who say you should stick it out at your current job for a minimum of 1 year, even 2.  You think 12 hr shifts at the bedside aren't for you.  Frankly, I don't think they're for anyone.  I really wonder about any occupation where you have to be chronically anxious to the point of becoming ill.  Something has to change.  When more nurses find ways to vote with their feet (and hands and brains) then maybe hospital administrators will smarten up.
    Meanwhile, grab it.  If you hate it you can move to the next thing.  Good luck!
  4. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Sue Damonas, BSN in Pyxis Problems   
    My last workplace (ambulatory care) had a different brand machine.  It wasn't anal; it was downright passive aggressive.  It would pretend it never saw your fingerprint before.  The process to actually get one of its precious meds out of it was quite elaborate.  If the multiple steps weren't completed just so, you had to start over.
    Sometimes it would decide it needed to reboot itself, but only if the clinic was especially busy that day.  We learned never to keep epi or other emergency meds in it.
    That machine would not have lasted a week on a med-surg floor.  Someone would have taken a baseball bat to it.  Probably me.
  5. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from JKL33 in Failed Capstone clincial....   
    This defense is not going to help you.  The whole point of a capstone clinical is to demonstrate readiness to assume a professional role.  Saying "...as a student I was just doing what my superior told me..." shows that you are not yet ready to assume professional responsibility for your actions.  If the appeals committee hears you say this, they will conclude that you are not ready to move out of a student role.
  6. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Interesting case of the spilled pills   
    You're right about everything.  At the jail where I worked, the county settled everything.  And inmates have 24 hrs a day to think up things.  A case like this would certainly have been worth a few bucks.  With no ill effects. That inmate won the lottery.
  7. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Serhilda, ADN, RN in Being a target by a coworker.   
    There is a recent thread on this site about giving people enough rope to hang themselves.  That might be your best bet in this case.  Fabricated is easy.  It means she has nothing and the onus is on her to show that she has something.  I laugh at fabricated.
    I would approach your manager after every incident report and request "feedback".  That would show a proactive approach to learning from your errors.  It will also make the day charge start looking bad if she's writing a lot of nonsense.  Do not discuss with her or your "friend" what to do about the problem person.  Just deal with each situation as it comes up - calmly, factually and non-defensively.
     Do not "talk to" the perpetrator.  That never works with underhanded people.  HR is usually worse than useless.  Don't poke sticks in that cage.  I would talk to the union, just to give them a heads up.  (Unless the charge nurse is very active in the union; then she will have more credibility with them.)  Do keep a notebook at home.  Record every interaction you have with this person and with anyone else as a result of her actions.
    Meanwhile, let her keep writing her stupid incident reports.  She is creating a paper trail with her name on it.  This is her rope.  When Risk Management and whoever else starts smelling a vendetta then she will be on the hot seat.  You can check your contract if there's any language about "hostile work environment" and decide if you want to use your notebook and pursue anything at any point.
     
  8. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN in Is it possible for me to be a good nurse?   
    I think your anxiety and self-doubt have become a self-perpetuating cycle.  You expect to do badly, then you do badly, then you doubt yourself....
    Anxiety is not a completely bad thing in a student, new grad or experienced nurse.  Actually, one of the biggest red flags in a new grad is over-confidence and the belief that one has it all together.  Those are the ones who are dangerous.
    Is it possible to go to the skills lab on your own time to practice things?  Pick one thing you have trouble with, and do it over and over until it starts to feel easier.  You might just need a bit more time to gain mastery and confidence.  Try to find ways to give yourself that time.
    When you graduate, try to find a job with a really good orientation or internship.  For NCLEX, use Mosby's Comprehensive Nursing Review or whatever the current gold standard study guide is.
    Here's my trick for those multiple choice exams:  Read the question but not the answers.  Does anything immediately pop into your head?  Then look to see if it is one of the answers.  If it is, mark that one and MOVE ON.  Other than making sure you answered every question, do not go back and review your test.  Do not start second-guessing yourself and changing answers.
    I'm rooting for you.  Hang in there.
  9. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from NRSKarenRN, BSN in Failed Capstone clincial....   
    I'm really sorry you're having to go through this, after believing that you were on track. 
    To play devil's advocate, I'm wondering if your preceptor thought each error was an isolated situation at the time, but as the time drew nearer she had a rethink.  Your GPA, honour society status, etc really has no bearing on your clinical skills.
    Mention in your appeal that you are a lot more competent in maintaining sterility.  If your preceptor has reasons to still believe you haven't grasped the principles of sterile technique, that could be a concern.
    No matter how non-cognitively intact you believe your patient to be, always give them the benefit of the doubt.  That means you explain everything as you do it, as a matter of respect.  
    It probably wouldn't hurt to mention that you were graded well each week(do you have copies of those weekly evaluations?)and felt confident that you were learning from your mistakes and that you are now dumbfounded at being told you are not ready to graduate.
    Good luck.
  10. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from sevensonnets in Difficulties interpreting in casual conversation with patients?   
    Casual conversations between nurses and patients?  What exactly does that mean?
  11. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from poppycat, ADN, BSN in Nursing fields suited for physical limitations/chronic illness   
    This website is open to the public and is an excellent place to start researching nursing as a possible career.  It just seems to not be the best of planning to undertake the rigours of schooling for a career that might not be doable.
    Now the OP is trying to find a way to salvage her career and it might not be easy.  Yes, lots of people don't want to work bedside.  But a significant number of us find that it takes a few years at the bedside to be able to get out of it.  And the away-from-bedside jobs aren't necessarily a piece of cake, either.
    Unfortunately, nursing requires a LOT more than being understanding of people's pain.  Because the people in the beds can't be expected to be understanding of your pain.
    There are occasional posts that pop up on this site:  "I'm a new nurse but I don't want to work nights."  "I'm a new nurse but I can't stand for long periods."  "I'm a new nurse but I need every Sunday off because church is important to me." "I'm a new nurse and I think it's unfair that I have to work Christmas."
    For those of us who have spent our adult lives on our feet, during the night, on weekends, holidays, etc - we can only shake our heads.  Anyone whose dre-e-e-am it is to be a nurse - find out what's required before deciding if it's for you.  It's not classified information.
  12. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to Katie Slayton in Do I have to disclose mental illness   
    Nursing school only has an interest in knowing if you’re capable of completing the program. If you have any injuries or medical problems that could pose a risk they should know that. Otherwise you still have a right to privacy.   Even the nursing board cannot go into a nurse’s medical records.  As far as I’m concerned all you have to show them as a current physical and you do not need to tell them what meds you’re on. And legally they can only test for potentially illegal ones.
  13. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN in Is it possible for me to be a good nurse?   
    I think your anxiety and self-doubt have become a self-perpetuating cycle.  You expect to do badly, then you do badly, then you doubt yourself....
    Anxiety is not a completely bad thing in a student, new grad or experienced nurse.  Actually, one of the biggest red flags in a new grad is over-confidence and the belief that one has it all together.  Those are the ones who are dangerous.
    Is it possible to go to the skills lab on your own time to practice things?  Pick one thing you have trouble with, and do it over and over until it starts to feel easier.  You might just need a bit more time to gain mastery and confidence.  Try to find ways to give yourself that time.
    When you graduate, try to find a job with a really good orientation or internship.  For NCLEX, use Mosby's Comprehensive Nursing Review or whatever the current gold standard study guide is.
    Here's my trick for those multiple choice exams:  Read the question but not the answers.  Does anything immediately pop into your head?  Then look to see if it is one of the answers.  If it is, mark that one and MOVE ON.  Other than making sure you answered every question, do not go back and review your test.  Do not start second-guessing yourself and changing answers.
    I'm rooting for you.  Hang in there.
  14. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Here.I.Stand in Interesting case of the spilled pills   
    Actually this whole story made me laugh and not because it was remotely funny.  It's just...  so Corrections.  And just when I thought I'd seen the nth degree of multi-layer stupidity...
    Correctional facilities should have a state-approved formulary.  Being a criminal should not guarantee access to meds the law-abiding population can't get its hands on.
    As previous posters have said, if the pills needed to be counted - even if the inmate brought his own in - they should have been blister-packed.
    Those nurses do not need remedial courses in pharmacology; they need a course on professional assertiveness.  The pharmacist needs to get a nice job selling shoes somewhere.
  15. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to CommunityRNBSN in Failed Capstone clincial....   
    I agree with this 100%. Your parents are in parent mode— so they are entirely on your side ready to cheer you on. They are not being objective.  So be thankful for their support but do NOT take them at their word about the nurse “covering” herself. That doesn’t sound at all like what is happening in reality. 
  16. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to CommunityRNBSN in Failed Capstone clincial....   
    It does sound inappropriate that you didn’t have a chance to correct your mistakes. (I realize we only have one side of the story here.).
     
    I am consistently saddened to hear of people failing clinicals. At the start of our last semester, the instructor said “Nobody fails my clinical. My job is to help you become safe nurses, and we are going to work together to make that happen.”  Now obviously, if somebody was ... I don’t know...showing up drunk, stealing pills, constantly giving meds to the wrong patients... obviously there are ways to fail clinical. But something like being inept at inserting a Foley— My instructor would have made sure you had 50 chances to practice (starting on a mannequin) so that you could do it. 
    You may have to re-do. But in 5 years this will be just a painful story that you hardly ever think about, and you’ll be a nurse. 
  17. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from NRSKarenRN, BSN in Failed Capstone clincial....   
    I'm really sorry you're having to go through this, after believing that you were on track. 
    To play devil's advocate, I'm wondering if your preceptor thought each error was an isolated situation at the time, but as the time drew nearer she had a rethink.  Your GPA, honour society status, etc really has no bearing on your clinical skills.
    Mention in your appeal that you are a lot more competent in maintaining sterility.  If your preceptor has reasons to still believe you haven't grasped the principles of sterile technique, that could be a concern.
    No matter how non-cognitively intact you believe your patient to be, always give them the benefit of the doubt.  That means you explain everything as you do it, as a matter of respect.  
    It probably wouldn't hurt to mention that you were graded well each week(do you have copies of those weekly evaluations?)and felt confident that you were learning from your mistakes and that you are now dumbfounded at being told you are not ready to graduate.
    Good luck.
  18. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Sue Damonas, BSN in Pyxis Problems   
    My last workplace (ambulatory care) had a different brand machine.  It wasn't anal; it was downright passive aggressive.  It would pretend it never saw your fingerprint before.  The process to actually get one of its precious meds out of it was quite elaborate.  If the multiple steps weren't completed just so, you had to start over.
    Sometimes it would decide it needed to reboot itself, but only if the clinic was especially busy that day.  We learned never to keep epi or other emergency meds in it.
    That machine would not have lasted a week on a med-surg floor.  Someone would have taken a baseball bat to it.  Probably me.
  19. Haha
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to Kooky Korky in Interesting case of the spilled pills   
    The inmate should get to count all of his winnings - all the way to the electric chair.
    No, I don't know what he did, but he has likely cost the taxpayers quite a lot in his life.  And don't forget the future crimes he will likely commit.
    Only in America, I think.  Or is it the times we live in?
  20. Like
    TriciaJ, RN got a reaction from Sue Damonas, BSN in Pyxis Problems   
    My last workplace (ambulatory care) had a different brand machine.  It wasn't anal; it was downright passive aggressive.  It would pretend it never saw your fingerprint before.  The process to actually get one of its precious meds out of it was quite elaborate.  If the multiple steps weren't completed just so, you had to start over.
    Sometimes it would decide it needed to reboot itself, but only if the clinic was especially busy that day.  We learned never to keep epi or other emergency meds in it.
    That machine would not have lasted a week on a med-surg floor.  Someone would have taken a baseball bat to it.  Probably me.
  21. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to Davey Do in Pyxis Problems   
  22. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to Serhilda, ADN, RN in Pyxis Problems   
    Oh God, when pharmacy randomly decides to send some of your patient's medications from central pharmacy to the patient's bin, some to the drawer, some are lying around in the tubes still, and some are no where to be found. It's a huge time suck. If only they could reliably send up medications, all on time.
  23. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN in Interesting case of the spilled pills   
    This is just nuts. I never heard of such a thing being asked of a nurse--shake the pills out of the sharps container? Really?? And they actually did it, which is even more stupid. The BON is absolutely right in this case. You don't do something like this just because someone in a position of a higher authority tells you to do it. Stupid is as stupid does.
  24. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to Daisy4RN in Interesting case of the spilled pills   
    Yes, this is sooo true, the minute you tell the manager, or MD, that you will not do this/that and that they can feel free to do it if they think it is OK they immediately change their tune!! Been there, don't that many times.
  25. Like
    TriciaJ, RN reacted to rn1965 in Interesting case of the spilled pills   
    What in the ?????
    How disgusting.  Why would anyone, let alone a nurse or pharmacist, think it would be okay to give ANY PATIENT pills that come out of a DIRTY sharps container?!?!?!
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