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BostonFNP

BostonFNP

AN Guide

Reputation Activity by BostonFNP

Reactions Received

Like 18

  1. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Sherrylin22, BSN, RN in DNP vs MSN   
    Go to the best quality program you can, forget the degree and forget the cost, invest in yourself and your future practice with the best quality program.
  2. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from FullGlass, BSN, MSN in DNP vs MSN   
    I did it because it was free, I thought I might need it down the road, and it helped with continuing ed.
    My biggest problem with the DNP is that there is no evidence that it improves outcomes. The data is the most important thing to me, and in this case, there just isn't any. People have "called me out" on supporting a BSN entry while not supporting a DNP (or not supporting MD superiority over NP) and it is for this exact reason: I support what the data demonstrates to be true, otherwise it is just degree inflation.
  3. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Sherrylin22, BSN, RN in Primary Care/IM: Ask me anything.   
    It sounds like you will have an excellent background for the transition into primary care. The experience you bring from having been both an MA and an RN in a primary setting will make things easier for you when it comes to your job search.
    Nationwide, NPs are still in demand, especially in the primary care setting. That being said it varies a tremendous amount locally, with your personal and professional network, and with your school/alum network. Job postings will often "require" 3-5 years of experience: it is more of a wish list and a potential bargaining chip than it is a true requirement. From your perspective, you have a significant amount of primary care experience, and while not in a provider role, you know the workflow and the pitfalls of clinic work.
    The best jobs are often never posted: they come from your networking and from your clinical rotations. You likely have a lot of contacts through your work history, make sure everyone knows that you are in a program. Often times clinic will know about an opening months or even a year in advance and they may be more than willing to hold a job for you if they think you are the right candidate. Additionally, many positions in small independent clinics are filled via provider networks (I have offices call me a few times a year asking if any of my good students are looking for work or if any colleagues are).
    Hope that helps, if you have follow-ups fire away. Best of luck.
  4. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Sherrylin22, BSN, RN in DNP vs MSN   
    Go to the best quality program you can, forget the degree and forget the cost, invest in yourself and your future practice with the best quality program.
  5. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Kitiger, RN in Are We Letting Our Patients Suffer?   
    First off, in no way am I trying to defend or justify you not getting adequate pain relief. I would hope you could talk with your PCP about the issue. Your PCP knows you and knows your history. I don't want to see you (hear about you) being in pain and suffering, I'm sure that everyone here doesn't want to either! I am sorry that you have a front row seat for this issue.
    I am very surprised to hear some of your timelines; it is really unacceptable you have a right to be upset. I have never in my career seen a patient with acute cholecystitis be given pain meds in the ED and sent home for 10 days before surgery!
  6. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Devnation in Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners   
    Yeah that's why I feel that it needs to come from the national accreditation and certification side of the equation: increase the board difficulty and make programs maintain a upper 70% board pass rate to keep accreditation. This higher hurdle would force programs to be more selective and teach better, result in loss of accreditation by sup-par programs, while also decreasing the numbers coming into the APN role.
  7. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from michksmith14, BSN, RN in Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners   
    Remember if you take the boards as an NP you are on the clock for your practice hours if you want to be able to re-certify in five years.

    The RN role shouldn't be a holding pattern for NPs. There are other ways to address the supply problem, mainly making the standards for entry into the NP role considerably higher. The main problem is with nursing as a whole wanting to "give everyone a chance" regardless of whether or not the individual really has what it takes to do the job best.
  8. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Devnation in Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners   
    Yeah that's why I feel that it needs to come from the national accreditation and certification side of the equation: increase the board difficulty and make programs maintain a upper 70% board pass rate to keep accreditation. This higher hurdle would force programs to be more selective and teach better, result in loss of accreditation by sup-par programs, while also decreasing the numbers coming into the APN role.
  9. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Joe V in Baby nurse doo doo doo doo....   
    Lol it was fantastic click bait of a title! It is lost on some I guess.
  10. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from Joe V in Baby nurse doo doo doo doo....   
    You did a great job you should be proud.
    I am of the opinion that a RR should have been called.
  11. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in 10 Tips For Being A Better Nursing Student And Lifelong Learner   
    Your investment in your education is a significant one: it is an investment of your time, your finances, and perhaps at times, your sanity. Studying smart helps you capitalize on that investment.
    Having been though a significant amount of undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral education myself along with being involved in didactic and clinical teaching, here of some of my personal and professional thoughts about how to study smart.
    1. Learn don't cram and build a strong foundation
    Cramming may help briefly but it does little for you in the long-term. Nursing education builds on what was learned in previous classes and this results in having to try and cram more and more information each class. If you cram on the anatomy of a nephron then next semester when you are learning about the difference in mechanism of action between thiazide and loop diuretics or the homeostasis of blood pressure via the JGA action on the RAS system you are going to struggle. If you have a strong foundation, it is much easier to understand what causes a disease, what symptoms it will manifest, and how you can treat it and what complications you might expect.
    2. Diffusion doesn't work
    It would be wonderful if studying worked by simple diffusion but it doesn't, it requires active transport. It takes effort to learn. There is no way around putting the effort in, so be smart about it!
    3. Have a plan and a schedule
    Having a daily and weekly plan to review material and study well before the exam allows you to be efficient in the effort you put into your studying. You read and review a small amount of information each day in a controlled manner and by the time the exam comes you understand it all. If you were going to pour a precious liquid into a
    4. Remember that you are smarter than you may feel
    The material will be hard, the exams will challenge even the brightest students, and there will be a competitive environment but you were given this opportunity because you made the cut. You have the potential to be great, and at times it may be easy to doubt that if you let yourself.
    5. Remember that you can always know more
    Nursing is a profession of lifelong learning. You will never be "done". Each chapter, each case study, each assignment is a change to broaden your knowledge. Each patient is a chance to apply your knowledge. You are a student and this is your time to learn; ask questions, do all your readings and your assignments, because they can all help you on nursing exams and more importantly in practice.
    6. Everyone falters and fails
    Be easy on yourself and be constructive with yourself. Don't focus on the error instead on the rationale. You can learn more from a wrong answer than you can from a correct one if you stay constructive.
    7. Use what you have
    Nursing exams may ask you about something you have never even heard of, and that can be frustrating if you let it. Approach each question and each topic with the mentality of applying what you do know rather than what you don't. Start from the basics if you are unsure: what would Maslow and ABCD say? And hope you didn't cram that day but actually learned about Maslow and ABCD, because in nursing education, they are often the solution.
    8. Study in a group
    It takes a village mantra works well for nursing school. Your group allows you to divide and conquer. It gives you motivation to review material prior to a session. It supports you when times are difficult. It lets you see other approaches to the same topic. It corrects you when you have misunderstood something. Most importantly, it helps you enjoy learning.
    9. Seek help when needed
    If you are struggling with a concept or a class, seek help from a professional early. Most programs have free access to tutors. Most professors are willing to give you some 1 on 1 time. Just like cramming, waiting to get help may mean disaster in the end.
    10. The golden rule: Be a Student
    You are investing heavily in your education, take the time to actually be a student. That means putting effort into studies. That means making mistakes. That means admitting to yourself that you are on a long road as sometimes just putting one foot in front of the other is what it takes.
  12. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from subee, MSN, CRNA in Texas Children's investigates RN for social media HIPAA violation   
    Russian bots are not just anti-democracy — they're also anti-vaccine - The Washington Post
    Russian Twitter trolls are 'weaponising' the online vaccine debate
    In another attack on Western society, Russian trolls sow doubt about vaccines
    Russian trolls 'spreading discord' over vaccine safety online | Society | The Guardian
    Why a Russian Anti-Vaccine Trolling Operation Failed On Twitter | Fortune
    Russian Trolls Used Vaccine Debate to Sow Discord, Study Finds - The New York Times
    even:
    Russian trolls, bots 'spreading discord' over vaccine safety, scientists say | Fox News
  13. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from michksmith14, BSN, RN in Oversupply of Nurse Practitioners   
    Remember if you take the boards as an NP you are on the clock for your practice hours if you want to be able to re-certify in five years.

    The RN role shouldn't be a holding pattern for NPs. There are other ways to address the supply problem, mainly making the standards for entry into the NP role considerably higher. The main problem is with nursing as a whole wanting to "give everyone a chance" regardless of whether or not the individual really has what it takes to do the job best.
  14. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in I really need advice   
    Deciding between FNP and PMHNP is a big choice, and while you can always post-masters later on, it is the foundation of your practice. From the advice of a number of practicing PMHNPs here on AN, prior RN experience in the psych specific role may be more valuable to you entering practice. Spend some time shadowing if you still have questions about what direction you want to go.
    FNPs are a primary care trained specialty and while many FNPs do work int he inpatient setting (I have as well) there is increasing traction on employers hiring ACNPs for inpatient work, specialty in high acuity settings like the ICU. Consider this as well if you have a desire to work inpatient as you may be better severed by moving to an ACNP program even if it is not at your current school.
    If you are willing to move where you need to, odds are you won't have any real difficulty finding a job. The market is some areas has tightened (and with that employers can be more picky about experience) but in other areas it is wide open, sometimes even with a short commute. Again, put posts in context re: the job market as many opinions are coming from people who aren't looking for NP jobs.
  15. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in Prescribers vs Providers   
    What do NPs provide to who?
    To patients, access to quality and cost effective health care.
    To themselves, the chance to take the next step, write the orders, make the diagnosis, lift the ceiling off the salary cap, step over to the other side of nursing and medicine.
    To RNs, inspiration for jealous or confused rants lately apparently.
    To MDs, an easy revenue stream.
  16. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in Brian Short News   
    The admin and the rest of the staff is working through this horrible news and attempting to keep all the posts together. There have been some technical glitches, please bear with the staff, as you can imagine, everyone is personally and professionally affected.
  17. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from traumaRUs, MSN, APRN in From the files of "You can't make this up".   
    Lets get back onto a topic we all love; the crazy things we hear:
    Patient "serious concerns" about newly prescribed med.
    1. It's "addicting" and "hard to get off of".
    2. It causes respiratory depression.
    Patient would "prefer" to "just go back on hydrocodone" which has "none of those side effects".
    When told hydrocodone also has those side effects, pt responds "not for me".
    When told she wouldn't get a script for narcotics, she responds "you work for me".
    Reminded me of ZDoggMD's parody of Taylor Swift, "Blank Script".
  18. Like
    BostonFNP got a reaction from NRSKarenRN, BSN in Support Kaci Hickox   
    Sent from my iPhone.
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