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ThePrincessBride

ThePrincessBride

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  1. ThePrincessBride

    Is this crazy?

    Sorry for all of the threads, but I am stressing out a lot and I could use some insight from wiser people. I am in the middle of getting ready to go to graduate school for FNP. I got into a university that finds preceptors for their students. I will be going to the program part-time online while working for the hospital full-time in order to have tuition paid for. I have worked this exact same job before dropping down to contingent, so I know what to expect. Love the coworkers. No set weekends (which I like). It is adult med-surg, and the patients, as a whole, treat the nurses horribly. However, the job has AMAZING benefits, I'm talking pensions, GREAT insurance, lots of sick/vacation time, lots of recognized holidays.... I would have to leave my position in the neonatal ICU and this gives me anxiety. I love the NICU, but I don't think I would be able to handle full-time work, contingent work AND grad school all at once. I find myself feeling sad. Also... I am scared. So many people are going to school to become FNPs. Everyone and their dog is going to FNP school, and the market is quickly becoming flooded. I have talked to previous coworkers who have graduated. While nearly all of them have jobs, some are still working bedside and haven't secured a full-time position. Others are at retail clinics working every other weekend, holidays, and have on-call (which sounds horrible to me, even though I initially liked the idea of working at a minute clinic). Ideally, I would love to work at an urgent care, a prison or a clinic where I could work 3-4 days per week with minimal weekend/holiday requirements, no call. Or I would like to work at the VA or a school system. Unfortunately, I am not seeing too many jobs out there that match that description or would hire a new grad. So, I guess I am asking, is going to FNP school a mistake? Part of me thinks that I won't find a job. But if I don't go, I think I will look back in life and regret not at least trying, if that makes sense. Also, I won't have accrued any debt. And I KNOW I could switch to Psyche NP (there are LOTS of jobs, and I think I would LOVE psyche). I could go back and get a post-masters in Psyche. There is a year of overlap in the program, as well.
  2. ThePrincessBride

    Is this crazy?

    Sorry for all of the threads, but I am stressing out a lot and I could use some insight from wiser people. I am in the middle of getting ready to go to graduate school for FNP. I got into a university that finds preceptors for their students. I will be going to the program part-time online while working for the hospital full-time in order to have tuition paid for. I have worked this exact same job before dropping down to contingent, so I know what to expect. Love the coworkers. No set weekends (which I like). It is adult med-surg, and the patients, as a whole, treat the nurses horribly. However, the job has AMAZING benefits, I'm talking pensions, GREAT insurance, lots of sick/vacation time, lots of recognized holidays.... I would have to leave my position in the neonatal ICU and this gives me anxiety. I love the NICU, but I don't think I would be able to handle full-time work, contingent work AND grad school all at once. I find myself feeling sad. Also... I am scared. So many people are going to school to become FNPs. Everyone and their dog is going to FNP school, and the market is quickly becoming flooded. I have talked to previous coworkers who have graduated. While nearly all of them have jobs, some are still working bedside and haven't secured a full-time position. Others are at retail clinics working every other weekend, holidays, and have on-call (which sounds horrible to me, even though I initially liked the idea of working at a minute clinic). Ideally, I would love to work at an urgent care, a prison or a clinic where I could work 3-4 days per week with minimal weekend/holiday requirements, no call. Or I would like to work at the VA or a school system. Unfortunately, I am not seeing too many jobs out there that match that description or would hire a new grad. So, I guess I am asking, is going to FNP school a mistake? Part of me thinks that I won't find a job. But if I don't go, I think I will look back in life and regret not at least trying, if that makes sense. Also, I won't have accrued any debt. And I KNOW I could switch to Psyche NP (there are LOTS of jobs, and I think I would LOVE psyche). I could go back and get a post-masters in Psyche. There is a year of overlap in the program, as well.
  3. ThePrincessBride

    Is this crazy?

    So I got to into a Family Nurse Practitioner program. It is part-time, online and associated with a B and M school with a very large hospital. It is extremely expensive. In order to get my tuition paid for, I would need to work at the hospital full-time. No problem. Already have an offer on the adult med-surg floor that I work contingent on. However... I would have to leave my full-time NICU job at a different hospital and the thought is killing. I love babies. It was my dream job, and I thought I wanted to be a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. But the thought of rotating shifts (two-six weeks days, two-six weeks nights, weekends and holidays) and being stuck in the hospital forever with very few employment opportunities was something I don't think I wanted to deal with. But I love the bedside care. I could ask to go contingent, but that would require working 36 hours every six weeks, certain number of weekends and holidays. I don't have any kids, which makes things less complicated, but... Am I nuts? Is it possible to juggle grad-school part-time, a full-time job (3 12s) and a contingent job?
  4. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    Funny you say that. I work in a different unit contingent that is extremely diverse and I stay because I love my co-workers, there are no cliques. And with so many people leaving and some who have privately told me that it is due to cliques and not feeling welcomed or belonging (both black and white, male and female), I can say without a doubt that there is a problem on my unit that goes beyond me. Now, if it was just me saying this, I would be inclined to agree but I can't as too many other nurses have left for similar reasons. I used to be invested, did committee work and everything but I am mentally done with the BS, though I plaster a smile on my face and 'fake it'
  5. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    I actually just asked to go part time and part-time workers can and do precept.
  6. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    Thank you for all the replies. It really means a lot! To answer your questions, I am going back to school to become a Nurse Practitioner, so not quite education-related, though I thought precepting would be a good resume-builder. I know that confronting the educator would probably create a backlash, and I am trying to stay under the radar. I do my best to engage in small talk and I get along with my co-workers on a professional level, but I get left out because I don't fit in. It is one of the reasons that has pushed me to pursue higher education, that feeling of isolation. One of the assistant managers has told me that I am quiet. I have never been outgoing and don't have any close friends; it has been like that since high school, and I have become accustomed to it. It is nice to hear from other people that I shouldn't let this bother me. It is just hard not to feel a little slighted, but I need to keep my emotions checked and not let this consume me.
  7. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    I know what you mean. It just bothers me to know a colleague thinks so poorly of me and harbors bad feelings toward me even years after the fact, you know?
  8. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    I could bring it up during my yearly eval as that would be the perfect time to do so. Maybe a casual, "I see we are hiring more nurses. I am available to precept." And then leave it at that.
  9. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    Thanks for the reply. I have definitely become introverted mostly due to the cliques and back-stabbing on the unit (and I wonder if this is part of the reason we are losing so many nurses). I never call off (ever) and have worked overtime and picked up in the past. I also did some committee work. But I really don't fit in, being black and childless on a unit with mostly white, young to middle-age mothers. So of course, we don't interact much and I am excluded from out-of-unit activities. I have been coping by throwing myself into patient care but I do feel lonely and isolated at times. I just sometimes feel like some of my co-workers think little of me like I am black tar on the bottom of a shoe (points for anyone who knows the reference), so I just stay quiet.
  10. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    How would you respond in my situation?
  11. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    Thanks for your reply. I guess I am just bummed out and feel a little disrespected, as though my three years means nothing. I know she is shocked that I lasted this long. The good news is that I am going to grad school and dropping to part-time work so I have one foot out of the door, so I won't have to tolerate this for much longer.
  12. ThePrincessBride

    Would you be insulted?

    Would you be insulted if you were never asked to precept and people with less experience than you were being asked to precept left and right? I have been at my job for three years. The clinical nurse educator used to work on the floor and she precepted me and basically told me I was too stupid to work in the specialty. I ended up having to ask for a different preceptor and the two new ones I got disagreed and here we are three years later. She was promoted as clinical nurse educator and I can tell she hates me or at the very least thinks lowly of me. I asked a fellow coworker (one I trust) if I should be worried, if it means that I am too stupid or terrible. She says I should consider myself lucky. Also, if I was so terrible, I would have been fired ages ago. I would have thought with the extremely high turnover and the fact that I am quickly becoming more experienced that I would have been asked but then I remembered my history with the nurse educator. How should I approach this, if at all? It isn't that I necessarily want to precept, but it bothers me that there may be a reason I haven't been asked. Or should I thank my lucky stars?
  13. ThePrincessBride

    Racial Discrimination In The Nursing Profession

    It is alive and well, but a lot of people are completely ignorant of it. As a new grad with a BSN, honors, years of PCA experience, etc, I was told I needed two years of adult med-surg experience to even be considered for a position in the NICU but they were hiring white new grads, some without a BSN (and this was a magnet hospital) with NO healthcare experience outside of school clinicals left and right. It is blatant, but should it shock us? Not really. Look who is our president.
  14. ThePrincessBride

    Swastikas & Nursing | Refusing care based upon moral objection?

    I'm going to go against the grain, but as a black person, I will not put up with racist remarks and derogatory comments from a patient. If the patient is respectful, then we're good to go. But I'm not about to be called the n-word or deal with obscenities for 12 hrs. Nope.
  15. ThePrincessBride

    So TIRED OF IT

    See post above. And by the way, my boyfriend is a CPA and my brother is an Engineer who works with multiple clients. They both agree that they don't have to put up with near amount of BS as I do...and they make much more. Nursing is not a customer service role...are you even a nurse? I doubt it judging from this post.
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