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yelnikmcwawa

yelnikmcwawa

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yelnikmcwawa's Latest Activity

  1. yelnikmcwawa

    New entry-level Masters program at U of A!!

    That's basic algebra. You just add up all of your GPA points recieved and divide by the number of credits taken. If you have different credit systems between some universities, you just convert the out lyers to the most common used system of all your credits, and then complete the above process.
  2. yelnikmcwawa

    Healthcare professionals using insulting language

    I agree that those words are insensitive, but this is also an online forum for people, and sometimes people vent without thinking. Baglady RN is right that speaking up and politely reminding the post starter that those words may be offensive is a tactful way to handle it. Not everyone who says the word "retarded" or "gay" is a bad person :uhoh21:, sometimes we just have a lapse in judgement and need to be brought back.
  3. yelnikmcwawa

    Do you still perform skin testing prior to giving IV antibiotic?

    Nope, never done it.
  4. yelnikmcwawa

    New Nurses Precepting Students/New Hires?

    My supervisor says that multiple studies have shown that nurse preceptors with less than 2 years experience get some of the best "scores", quite possibly linked to the fact that they are young and fresh, not yet jaded, excited about the opportunity to finally teach, and sympathetic to the feelings of a new or student nurse. You don't have to be the taught by the best, you have to be taught by people who enjoy teaching. There is plenty of time to get support and help on the floor from more experienced nurses once you're out there. In fact, when I was learning, I remembered being so overwhelmed that half the stuff that went in my ear went out my other, so perhaps the best words of wisdom by the oldies is better kept for when one has gotten their feet a bit wet and are able to let it sink in and take hold
  5. yelnikmcwawa

    Needle stick - Hepatitis C positive patient

    What gauge was the needle and how deep did it get you? Do you know for sure the pt is Hep C positive or did he just have his antibodies show up positive? Big difference, because like I no longer have the virus so am not contagious, but will most likely show positive for the antibodies for the rest of my life.
  6. yelnikmcwawa

    Needle stick - Hepatitis C positive patient

    I am sorry you went through this R. Nurse:-( I too have been in your situation and actually contracted Hepatitis C. I'm assuming you have read my story in laughing's post, hence your friend request, but I'll post repost what I said here in this thread for your easy access and for others to read. I had a pt pull an iv insertion needle out and throw it before it was retracted, and it stuck me in the thigh. High risk needlestick as it was a large bore, hollow needle that was freshly filled with his venous blood, plus it was trajected across the room into my largest muscle! I was lucky, though, as the pt was HIV negative and I turned out to be one of the lucky 15 percent of people and spontaneously cleared the virus in the third month without having to do treatment. Did you start HIV prophylaxis? If you did, the advice I have for you is to stay on the anti-retro virals for as long as you can, or at least until the pt's HIV status comes back negative. If it is a high risk patient that may have been engaging in HIV risk behavior the last few months, then I'd stay on them for a full month even if his HIV test is negative....they suck hard core but your life depends on them. The odds of contracting HIV if you started the meds within 2 hours of your stick is dramatically decreased!!!!! Do not miss a dose!!!! As for Hep C, the only thing you can do is wait and get tested. There are no anti-retro virals that help decrease transmission. If you contract it, you still have a chance of clearing it spontaneously but if you don't then treatment is fairly suscessful for some genotypes, but reportedely very unpleasent. In 6 weeks you should get a PCR drawn...forget about getting a Hep C antibody test because that can take months to turn up positive. But if you contract the virus, it will almost certianly be present in your blood and so a PCR viral count can detect it right away; within as early as 2 weeks even. But unless you have symptoms of seroconversion, testing as early as 2 weeks might be a waste of time and money. If you are positive, get a specialist referral right away. You will get a genotyping of the virus and you can also get a genetic test that looks at the morphology of your IL28B gene as that can help determine your odds of spontaneously clearing the virus (if you want to of course. Genetic testing is a whole bag of ethical worms that I won't go into right now and if you want to go that route, please get some counseling about it first so you can decide what is best for you). If you have the good morphology (CC), then you could possibly wait it out for 3 to 6 months to see if you spontaneously clear. If you have the bad morphology, then I think the recommendation is that you start start Hep C treatment right away, as waiting will just decrease your odds of clearing. I actually planned to start treatment as soon as I was diagnosed but then got an acute attack right before I was to start. Got very ill, jaundiced, vomiting, horribly fatigued, ALT was almost 2000! My doctor told me this was a sign of spontaneous clearance, as I was showing a good immune response, and so I held off on treatment and waited a few more weeks and low and behold, I spontaneously cleared!!! I also had symptoms of seroconversion at 2 weeks post stick (fever of 104, chills, aches, lethargy for a few days) but I was given the shove off at the place where it happened so I had no guidance to get tested earlier and just followed up with my PCP at week 6 like she had originlly recommended. Best of luck and keep us posted. So, so, so sorry you have to go through this and I wish you well.
  7. yelnikmcwawa

    Needlestick Injuries Scaring Me Away From Nursing, HELP! :(

    No...many PAs are first assists in surgery and so the risk of personal injury is higher in that case. They also do suturing, suture removals, etc. I guess it would depend on what specialty you entered into, though.
  8. yelnikmcwawa

    Needlestick Injuries Scaring Me Away From Nursing, HELP! :(

    It's a risk you take in healthcare. I have never stuck myself but did have a pt pull out his IV insertion needle before the needle was retracted, and then throw it at me. It stuck me in the thigh and eventhough everyone kept telling me how little a chance I had of actually contracting something...bam! I contracted Hepatitis C from the A-hole. It's scary and oftentimes there is still risk no matter how hard you try to minimize it. It's just a reality of being a nurse and one that you must be comfortable accepting if you want to go into this field.
  9. yelnikmcwawa

    Worst case scenario needle stick

    Thanks for the update! Glad to hear that the news is good so far. Keep us updated!
  10. yelnikmcwawa

    New grad pay

    Mayo starts the BSN new grads at $28.38 day shift PLUS a full $6.15 night shift differential. But they make you work every other weekend and they don't pay differential on the weekends, so that kinda sucked. I did their new grad program but recently left to pursue a facility that better suited my needs, and I unfortunately took a huge pay cut for both my base pay and night shift diff. BUT, they only make us work every 3rd weekend, pay a weekend diff, and immediatly match up to 4% into our retirement, whereas Mayo didn't match at all, regardless of how long you were there. So there are pluses and minuses! But yeah,. I was beyond stoked to be making nearly 36 an hour as a new grad when I worked at Mayo!
  11. yelnikmcwawa

    suggestions-activities for brain damaged child

    You've gotten a bunch of good suggestions, and I'll just add that she may enjoy water play! I know that she has a trach and I don't know what her other limitation are, but bath and water play in a baby pool, tub, or trickling hose is fun for many children....developmentally delayed as well!
  12. yelnikmcwawa

    Ethical discussion about blood donation.

    I very much agree with your statement about screening for sexual behavior and not orientation! It's not about being "gay", it's about whether or not you have engaged in behavior that carries higher risk of acquiring blood born viral pathogens. I never meant to imply that sex is not a varied thing and that all homosexual men engage in anal sex. That is something I am in no way shape or form stereotypical about. But whatever. I agree with you, you just articulated it better.
  13. yelnikmcwawa

    Ethical discussion about blood donation.

    Donated blood is tested for antibodies, not actual viral presence because that is a very lengthy and expensive process. Sooooooo, someone could have contracted Hep C and have a VERY high viral count during the ramp up phase, but will not be antibody positive for several months. And in fact...some people, very rare indeed, but some people nonetheless never develop antibodies to Hep C. Therefore, that is why there are multiple checks; screening out high risk individuals and then testing blood for antibody presence because if you have engaged in a high risk behavior in recent past, you could be a festering viral factory and have no evidence of disease during the test phase. I for one, am very much an advocate of gay rights and think that profiling gays as being high risk is certianly faulty. But when people's lives are at risk, you can never be too careful and so any high risk behavior is taken as a non-compatable with blood donation. Gay sex is undeniably higher risk than heterosexual sex due to the trauma endured by the anus which is not meant to stretch as much as a vagina. And unfotunately, if we decided to get more "PC" about it and deny blood donation by anyone who engages in sex in general, then well we'd all bleed out unless a whole lot of priests and nuns lined up for donation!
  14. yelnikmcwawa

    Worst case scenario needle stick

    I am so glad to hear you are doing relatively well right now! This is a stressful time in your life and it is nice that you have so many supportive people helping you through it. What labs will they draw each scheduled time?
  15. yelnikmcwawa

    Worst case scenario needle stick

    Also, ask if your lab can run a PCR for Hep C on the patient and not just an antibody test. If he was positive at one point but cleared the virus, then he is not contageous but will still have the antibodies. If he is only antibody present, then no need to worry bout Hep C but you won't know if he is contageous unless a PCR is done. That will also give you a bit more knowledge about his viral load and odds of giving it to you. Low viral count=lower risk of course.
  16. yelnikmcwawa

    Worst case scenario needle stick

    I am sorry you went through this:-( I too have been in your situation and actually contracted Hepatitis C. Had a pt pull an iv insertion needle out and throw it before it was retracted, and it stuck me in the thigh. High risk needlestick as it was a large bore, hollow needle that was freshly filled with his venous blood, plus it was trajected across the room into my largest muscle! I was lucky, though, as the pt was HIV negative and I turned out to be one of the lucky 15 percent of people that spontaneously cleared the virus. The advice I have for you is to stay on the anti-retro virals...they suck hard core but your life depends on them. The odds of contracting HIV if you started the meds within 2 hours of your stick is dramatically decreased!!!!! Do not miss a dose!!!! As for Hep C, if you contract it, you still have a chance of clearing it spontaneously but if you don't then treatment is fairly suscessful for some genotypes. In 6 weeks you should get a PCR drawn...forget about getting a Hep C antibody test because that can take months to turn up positive. But if you contract the virus, it will almost certianly be present in your blood and so a PCR viral count can detect it right away. If you are positive, get a genotyping of the virus and also get a genetic test that looks at the morphology of your IL28B gene as that can help determine your odds of spontaneously clearing the virus. If you have the good morphology (CC), then wait it out for 3 to 6 months to see if you spontaneously clear. If you have the bad morphology, then start Hep C treatment right away. Best of luck and keep us posted. So, so, so sorry you have to go through this and I wish you well. PM me if you have questions for me!
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