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NooNieNursie

NooNieNursie

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NooNieNursie's Latest Activity

  1. I dont know if you live in an oversaturated part of country. If you do, it is not simply an issue of "getting an ICU job". Even if u graduated from best BSN school with 4.0 unless you know someone, you are not getting an ICU job as a new grad. The way new grads get into the ICU these days is first step is accept a TELEMETRY position. Most RNs hate telemetry because it combines the worst aspects of ICU and med surg onto one floor LOL. In NJ you have state mandated 6 patients only, but most of your patients are highly acute and one step away from medical ICU. However, you have 6 pts, which is only slightly less from a standard med surg floor with lower acuity. As a result, tele jobs are easy to come by for new grads, particularly on the night shift. Since tele is a higher acuity unit, you will likely be able to get your ACLS through your employer, which is a critical prerequisite before you are considered for any ICU job. After doing tele for 2 years with ACLS you may then be able to get an ICU job. The days of recruiting new grad nurses fresh from school any specialty they want they got and they will pay for your ACLS and sign on bonus, that is over. One thing is for certain, do NOT take a psych job fresh out of school if you want to work in the ICU. There is no way you hope to have even slightly relevant experience that will make any hospital no matter how crappy, consider you as a good prospect to take on. Now if you were working on telemetry for 2 years *and* have ACLS, there is chance you can get ICU job.
  2. NooNieNursie

    Need advice on picking best RN to BSN online program

    thanks for the suggestion I think monday i will call them just to see total fee schedule and prospective credits to complete for me personally my chamberlain tuition includes all books and fees as well so savings probably closer to 8-9k but that is nothing to sneeze at.
  3. NooNieNursie

    Need advice on picking best RN to BSN online program

    Hi there I just want to offer ANOTHER update it turns out the 45 credit program DID have prerequisite built into it, as i had originally assumed and why i selected the program. My transcript review is complete and everything transferred. I was very fortunate in this regard and start the program with 89 credits and many prereq satisfied; i just need statistics (which is fantastic as this is required for all APN programs pretty much), american history and pol sci. Since the 45 credit program includes prereqs, i was able to knock out several classes leaving me with 33 credits and 1 year to complete. Fantastic. Estimated tuition costs will be 20k, which DESTROYS any state school as i am rather certain my transcript review would not go this well and i would be doing at least 6+ lower level classes in addition to the nursing po rtion. Regarding the interview - it totally caught me offguard. I wasn't expecting it. However, it seems reasonable to interview a student before allowing them to apply to school, just to weed out ppl who are obviously poor candidates, someone who is unable to fashion a coherent response or seems impaired. My only problem with the interview is it was unexpected, i didn't anticipate it at that point in process so answers to some questions i had to simply admit ignorance (such as the history of chamberlain college). I didn't enjoy the interview, and would have preferred if i was warned in advance "are you ready to start your 45 minute interview?" rather than just starting this prolonged interview i might not have had the time to complete, or the preparation. anyway, i would like to make *another* update, the 45 credit program DOES INCLUDE prerequisites i was given wrong information (the admission liaison seems to make errors when communicating on phone...). Because this does include essential prerequisites, the average student needs 45 credits (which includes prereqs) and your previous ADN education substantiates 77 credits. Some unlucky students may need more than 45 credits. My transcript review went amazingly and i need 33 credits and of those 3 classes come from useful prereqs. For ADN with no prior education chamberlain seems a fabulous option; odds are any state school would review my transcript and REQUIRE i retake all these classes as they appear to be coded as not undergraduate level. EDIT: it seems aspen is offering a very similar program, but for 10k less than chamberlain. I would have to investigate, as it seems the only other online private college with cheaper/faster routes are pass fail schools like WGU. If aspen has a grading system, i might look into that (trying to avoid pass fail schools for future education)
  4. NooNieNursie

    Can I get Fired?

    I mean yes it is absolutely ridiculous to think a person obviously starting an IV on themselves as a prank is a junkie. Especially if nurse, u can get all the insulin needles you want, it will be less painful and annoying to use that. But this is admin we are talking about they only think legal risk and often dont care for staff. Opiate issues are so hot right now i can easily see some administration acting as a premptive cya for some zero tolerance policy. I agree likely NOTHING will happen but i would NEVER fool around in any way what so ever with this topic simply because of how hot it is in society. It's like joking about being a communist in the 50s.
  5. NooNieNursie

    Can I get Fired?

    Srsly i think sometimes people come on here just to feel better about themselves by proving they are the most diligent, capable, super nurse in the world who would NEVER waste an IV start kit zomg.
  6. NooNieNursie

    Can I get Fired?

    MTE Given opiate abuse and impaired nurses are very hot topics right now, all MDs terrified to prescribe more than a few opiates at a time or else, i would SERIOUSLY reconsider bragging about your abilities to start an IV on yourself at work. Depending on job market in area and how easy to replace, they may term just as a CYA measure. This is exactly why many facilities restrict access to heparin and insulin needles. With that said LIKELY nothing will come of it, but this is one of those things you should learn from - never give anyone any reason to suspect something like this. Do not brag about how well you utilize your nursing skills to maneuver your own veins.
  7. NooNieNursie

    Do you have to work as a CNA before going to nursing school?

    This is also a good point however OP is asking if it is necessary, suggesting she wants to do it to try to "get in" to the program, and would otherwise go right away. I went to a very old fashioned ADN program. Within like, the first week we were doing CNA work in the hospital. You knew early if this is something you were interested in or not. Things might be different now with BSN programs, but i think most nursing education is like, get them on the floor right away, learn from observation and experience not just classroom. A CNA license takes 6 weeks to obtain and it isnt free. Unless the OP is also looking for a job/money, i think the better thing to do would be apply now to start the process... if she is uncertain about whether or not it is right for her, she can maybe try to volunteer at the hospital just to observe the floor so she can actually see the tasks of various nursing staff better. Working as CNA can actually have opposite effect; she may think being a RN is being a CNA and decide it isnt right for her on that basis, which would be false. We know CNA work is immensely laborious and difficult physically, and it also is not an accurate representation of a typical day of work for RN.
  8. NooNieNursie

    Do you have to work as a CNA before going to nursing school?

    Great point It is going to be a transition switching from "how it really works" to how it works in test land.
  9. NooNieNursie

    Need advice on picking best RN to BSN online program

    I have an update to this thread (haha) as my foray into educating MYSELF about higher education (scams, truthfully) continues. My previous high evaluation of Chamberlain must be PROFOUNDLY modified as i just discovered the 45 credit program is ONLY for the nursing courses. SO essentially, it is just like the 30-35 credit state programs advertised, except they shortened the nursing class times BUT increased the number of classes, to milk MORE money out of the STUDENT, at an already outrageous cost of $590 per credit hour. My transcript is presently in review, and i will find out the final # of credits and classes i need to complete my BSN. Unless this program is seriously lacking, given my basic ADN education i am going to need a LOT of prerequisites. SO far, from what I see, ohio state has the best program of the ones i've researched. Credit hour cost is $380, but the nsg class portion is only 30 credit hours, and the required prerequisites are entirely reasonable for a BS degree. I may end up going with them after all, and just dealing with fact i cannot start until fall. So, just writing this to update everyone - i was COMPLETELY wrong thinking chamberlains 45 credit program included necessary prerequisites (at least partly), it includes NONE, making it actually WORSE than many other options. However, it seems chamberlains required prereqs are light... but so are many competitively priced state schools like ohio. Basically, point still remains: none of these "finish in a year or less" programs apply to the ADN who had no other education but ADN. The only one that might is WGU, but we all know that is a pass/fail school which will drag down GPA.
  10. NooNieNursie

    Do you have to work as a CNA before going to nursing school?

    It's one thing if you happened to be CNA and decided to become RN. That is a natural advantage. But advising someone go to CNA school, work as a CNA, then go to RN school, is a foolish waste of time. That is what school is for: it is for training. Any competently designed RN program, attended by a diligent responsible student, will produce a competent capable RN, whether or not they went to CNA school. The only thing i can see going to CNA school first, when you have already decided you want to be RN, and assuming you have the means to do it, is wasting precious time. You will get the experience in school (adjusting to medical environment and clinical situations). Your first employer will expect a novice, if they are any good at all, and ease you on to the floor. I say if you have the means to go to RN school now, go *now*, do not think you have to pay dues as CNA first; you are wasting time not being trained for your career.
  11. NooNieNursie

    Do you have to work as a CNA before going to nursing school?

    It might help slightly but by no way is it essential. I would seriously question a program that *required* CNA work. In your early nursing courses you are trained to be a CNA, so it's not like some fundamental background you need before nsg school. That's what you're doing first day on the floor - giving bed baths, assisting pt care needs. The vast majority of RNs never worked as a CNA. For my ADN training i worked PT at a local store taking my prerequisite classes, then when RN clinicals started i was a full time student (at time early 20s living at home).
  12. NooNieNursie

    Seeking Advice RN to BSN programs

    I posted a similar comment in another thread, but i want to repeat this message so people dont waste time I did, researching UTA and paying for their transcript, or worst, $100 application fee. UTA's 9 month/9k program requires *extensive* prerequisite education a basic ADN WILL.NOT.HAVE. If your only schooling after high school was ADN, you will need to take at least 30 credits in prerequisites, ON TOP of the 30 credit nursing portion. You will be in school, 1.5-2 years, you will pay nearly 18k in tuition credit hours alone. Additionally, while low cost per credit hour ($275), the UTA prerequisite requirements, are MUCH higher than any other online BSN program like say, ohio state. The ohio state non-nursing/lower level prerequisites are totally reasonable, and comparable to chamberlain. You will likely need 5 classes/15 credits from this menu, for typical ADN with no prior education, in addition to the 30 credit higher level nursing classes. At 380 per credit hour, that works out to about 17k and maybe 18 months (2 semesters for your 5 prerequisites; 4 semesters for your 30 credit higher nursing courses). Sadly i missed deadline to sign up for ohio's summer session, and i would have to wait until fall, and i don't want to waste any further time, so, chamberlain @ 26k for their 45 credits it is. I've been posting these replies for other overwhelmed ADN students to save their time. I saw so many people on this website talking about these state school online programs "finish in 1 year; finish in 9 months" and bragging how they did this. I don't know if all these people have a prior college education and went to ADN school for some reason instead of doing a bachelors bridge program in the first place, but this is totally unrealistic for a standard issue ADN RN who has no prior higher education OTHER than their ADN. You *will* need to take at *least* 45 credits total, if not MORE, and you *will* need to be in school 1.5 years, maybe more if you choose a bloated program like UTA. For these reasons i'm going with chamberlain, which is upfront, direct, no filler, designed truly for the ADN RN who has no other education. I have colleagues who completed the RN-BSN option and have nothing but positive reviews of how friendly it is; i cannot comment on their brick and mortar education or their APN programs. The RN-BSN option seems a very practical choice if you value completing quickly for a straightforward ADN prepared RN without prior education, BUT don't want to go to a pass/fail sketchy school like WGU that would bring my 3.9 GPA to 3.5 or something. It is more expensive, but not THAT much more expensive, when you really research how much *time* it will take to complete at traditional state schools. That time represents APN salary gained. So, prattling too long Writing to save others the agita i went through past few days/weeks. TRADITIONAL.ADN.WILL.NOT. finish at a state school in a year or less, that is a dream. I would say avoid UTA all together as their lower level prereqs are pretty extensive and ridiculous compared to many other state schools as well.
  13. NooNieNursie

    Need advice on picking best RN to BSN online program

    When researching online RN to BSN schools, be very wary of the "finish in 9 months / 30 credits" scam advertised to ADNs. I'm presently enrolled in chamberlain (slated to start in may, i have taken no classes yet, only submitted the 60 dollar application fee) but in the meantime I'm researching my other options. I too was VERY attracted to UTA and similar online state schools advertising very low credits to completion and low tuition for ADNs. What they dont TELL you is that time to completion assumes you have completed NUMEROUS prerequisites /lower pre nursing education classes, many of which were NOT included in your associates/diploma training. For example UTA with their glamorous 9 month/9k program requires TWO texas history classes - these required - in addition to two history classes, literature, composition II, a statistics class, et cetera. I analyzed my transcript, analyzed UTAs "lower level" prerequisites and estimated when all is said and done, it will take TWO YEARS to graduate from this school and nearly twice the cost advertised. Chamberlains relatively upfront 45 credit program at 590 dollars per credit hour, is 26k in comparison. This is more expensive, but i will finish in 15 months. The program is truthfully more honest, designed for straightforward ADN students with no other education. UTA is dishonest, as almost no ADN students will be capable of finishing in less than a year unless they happen to have extensive non ADN schooling. If you really can finish UTA in 9 months, good for you, but you are certainly in the minority of ADNs who don't have prior education; most bachelors trained nurses would have done a bachelors bridge program in first place, not an ADN.
  14. NooNieNursie

    <NEW GRAD for a year now, NO JOB!

    Go to LTC or rehab. Hospitals just aren't hiring right now.
  15. NooNieNursie

    Improved Nursing Employment Market Predicted

    Ok, so I suppose then if immigration is not a factor in the NE nursing job situation, it must purely be a coincidence that every single facility in my area is staffed almost exclusively by immigrants. At my facility, the vast majority of nurses are foreign. To say this has no factor in the NE job situation is foolish. It is obvious to anyone working here that immigration of foreign nurses is the major reason there are no jobs right now. The second reason is a glut of sub par nursing programs (which do not properly train students) pumping out new nurses (many of whom are also foreign born).
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