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Ruby Vee BSN

Crusty Old Bat

Original Member of the Crusty Old Bat Society

Reputation Activity by Ruby Vee

Reactions Given

Like 54
Thanks 3
Disagree 2

Reactions Received

Like 553
Thanks 9
Haha 11
Disagree 5
Sad 4

  1. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    At last -- a voice of reason!
  2. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from nurseebol in What is Abandonment?   
    No call/no show is job abandonment. 
    You have to have accepted an assignment in order to abandon it.  So the nurse who called in sick from a bar ten minutes after her shift started may be subject to other disciplinary issues, she didn't abandon her patients.  Two weeks later, when she wandered off the unit at lunch time, and didn't come back -- THAT was patient abandonment.
  3. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from BarrelOfMonkeys, BSN, RN in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    Whenever I am ask if I'd recommend nursing to someone, I always ask the question, "Why would you want to be a nurse?"  If they answer along the lines of stable job, interesting and challenging work, I tell them they'd make good nurses if they work hard, learn the material and are able to take accountability for and learn from their mistakes.  
    Anyone who tells me they want to be a nurse because they have "a calling," I tell they need to grow up and think this through a bit more.
  4. Thanks
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from vintagemother in If you could give one piece of advice back when you were a new grad RN, what would it be?   
    More new nurses fail at orientation because their new colleagues don't like them than for any other reason.  So it's not enough to concentrate on the job, on giving meds safely and correctly, drawing the labs, critical thinking, etc.  You have to work at your workplace relationships as well.  
    A new nurse who is well liked will be well-mentored.  A nurse who is disliked will not be, even if she does everything else right.
  5. Thanks
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from vintagemother in If you could give one piece of advice back when you were a new grad RN, what would it be?   
    More new nurses fail at orientation because their new colleagues don't like them than for any other reason.  So it's not enough to concentrate on the job, on giving meds safely and correctly, drawing the labs, critical thinking, etc.  You have to work at your workplace relationships as well.  
    A new nurse who is well liked will be well-mentored.  A nurse who is disliked will not be, even if she does everything else right.
  6. Haha
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from HotSauce77 in Pre nursing student has a question for current RNs   
    This!!
    I'd much rather work with nurses who are interested in the anatomy and physiology and like figuring things out than the holier than thou ones with "a calling."
  7. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from gcupid in The wage gap myth   
    There is a gender wage gap.  And not just because men work more overtime or take less time off for childbearing.  I've been married to two nurses -- male nurses -- and each of them had less education, less experience and and less experience in the specialty than me, and both made more PER HOUR.  We were doing the same job, in the same hospital in the same UNIT, and they made more per hour than a more qualified woman.  I know this because I had access to the pay stubs.  I am not the only female nurse married to a male nurse to have made this observation.
  8. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from BarrelOfMonkeys, BSN, RN in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    Whenever I am ask if I'd recommend nursing to someone, I always ask the question, "Why would you want to be a nurse?"  If they answer along the lines of stable job, interesting and challenging work, I tell them they'd make good nurses if they work hard, learn the material and are able to take accountability for and learn from their mistakes.  
    Anyone who tells me they want to be a nurse because they have "a calling," I tell they need to grow up and think this through a bit more.
  9. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from BarrelOfMonkeys, BSN, RN in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    So you had four jobs in your first year of nursing, and you think that the problem was all of THEM?  The common denominator in your poor job experiences was YOU.  Have you given some thought to why you failed at all of those jobs and what YOU could have done differently so that things would have worked out differently?  If not, that seems to be your problem.
    It isn't the profession.  It's probably you.
    I don't regret becoming a nurse, although my first year was really rough.  I was too nervous about not killing anyone to be friendly or worry about developing workplace relationships.  I asked stupid questions, and I didn't understand the answers, and rather than look to myself, I thought everyone else was at fault.  Thankfully, I figured things out without a ton of job hopping.  When I was more comfortable with my role as a nurse, I got friendlier and was easier to work with.  And people responded by being nicer to me.  
     
  10. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from BarrelOfMonkeys, BSN, RN in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    Whenever I am ask if I'd recommend nursing to someone, I always ask the question, "Why would you want to be a nurse?"  If they answer along the lines of stable job, interesting and challenging work, I tell them they'd make good nurses if they work hard, learn the material and are able to take accountability for and learn from their mistakes.  
    Anyone who tells me they want to be a nurse because they have "a calling," I tell they need to grow up and think this through a bit more.
  11. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from BarrelOfMonkeys, BSN, RN in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    So you had four jobs in your first year of nursing, and you think that the problem was all of THEM?  The common denominator in your poor job experiences was YOU.  Have you given some thought to why you failed at all of those jobs and what YOU could have done differently so that things would have worked out differently?  If not, that seems to be your problem.
    It isn't the profession.  It's probably you.
    I don't regret becoming a nurse, although my first year was really rough.  I was too nervous about not killing anyone to be friendly or worry about developing workplace relationships.  I asked stupid questions, and I didn't understand the answers, and rather than look to myself, I thought everyone else was at fault.  Thankfully, I figured things out without a ton of job hopping.  When I was more comfortable with my role as a nurse, I got friendlier and was easier to work with.  And people responded by being nicer to me.  
     
  12. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from BarrelOfMonkeys, BSN, RN in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    Whenever I am ask if I'd recommend nursing to someone, I always ask the question, "Why would you want to be a nurse?"  If they answer along the lines of stable job, interesting and challenging work, I tell them they'd make good nurses if they work hard, learn the material and are able to take accountability for and learn from their mistakes.  
    Anyone who tells me they want to be a nurse because they have "a calling," I tell they need to grow up and think this through a bit more.
  13. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    At last -- a voice of reason!
  14. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN reacted to Jedrnurse in Pre nursing student has a question for current RNs   
    The greater the person's self-perceived "calling", the more posts they'll end up writing about being disillusioned, burned out, etc.
    It's a profession with the potential for amazing variety and experiences. You'll have good days, bad days and everything in-between. But one thing it's not is a romanticized/holy "calling".
  15. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN reacted to not.done.yet, MSN, RN in Pre nursing student has a question for current RNs   
    Lots of nurses out there went into the field because it is a solid way to earn a living with little chance (most of the time) of being unable to find work. You don't have to have a calling to be a good one.
  16. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Lil Nel in Trials   
    I'm glad you have a lawyer and you're following their instructions.  I'm really glad that you have someone to talk to who is supportive of your feelings.  
    I don't know you, and I don't know your practice.  Not checking a blood sugar within 15 minutes (unless you failed to check it for several hours) is a "so what?" sort of mistake.  On an insulin drip, it would be a big deal, but not TPN.  Wrong fluids -- also probably not a big deal if you caught it within 20 minutes.  The insulin pump -- not sure I understand what the problem was there, if you overlooked that she HAD an insulin pump or what.  But it doesn't really matter to my point.
    My point is that more new nurse and nurses new to a particular job fail in their orientation because the established staff doesn't LIKE them than for any other reason.  Often times it's just because the new person is anxious and too focused on the tasks to take time to be LIKABLE.  I know this because I was that new grad who was nearly run out of my job and my career.  
    If people LIKE you, they will cut you some slack, even when the errors are huge.  If they don't like you, you will wind up in all kinds of trouble even for minor errors.  The takeaway is that you want people to like you.  So, while you are at work, you pretend to be an extrovert; you act as if you like everyone you encounter and are thrilled to see them.  You smile and say hi to everyone, every single time.  You take 30-60 seconds to ask them about their commute or their garden or their dog or their kid every single day, even if you don't really give a crap.  You introduce yourself to everyone until you are positive they know your name.  That's hard work, but it is part of the work of starting a new job.  
    Trust me, I don't like this either, but it's the reality.
  17. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from NurseSpeedy, ADN, LPN, RN in Nurses with Attitude   
    Ya know what?  Both of these nurses were talking to an anxious family, not an entitled, belligerent or abusive family.  I would challenge anyone to be so yippy-skippy when the family is demanding steak dinners for everyone and the spouse is threatening to "take you outside and mess you up" if you don't ______" (insert absolutely insane demand.)
    Yes, we all need to be positive and set the tone.  But isn't there a little leeway between Nurse Nightmare and Nurse Sunshine, the company whore?
  18. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    At last -- a voice of reason!
  19. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from TriciaJ, RN in new nurse /gaslighting   
    Wasn't it Eleanor Roosevelt who said that no one can make you feel inferior without your consent?
    In adulthood, it is very difficult to make friends, and it doesn't happen instantly.  Good workplace relationships is probably what you're looking for -- and some good workplace relationships have the potential to turn into friendships down the road.  It's just unrealistic to expect new colleagues to become true friends within a few months.  
    Being quiet and avoiding people isn't the way to develop good working relationships.  What you do is go out of your way to be friendly to everyone.  You say you're a friendly, talkative person -- you have a leg up on this.  It's the genuinely quiet, introverted person who has the more difficult time with this.  Say hello to everyone the first time you see them that day, and introduce yourself to everyone until it's clear that they remember who you are and what your name is.  Make the first move.  Act as if you LIKE them, even if you don't.  
    And, since you ARE new, I'll leave you with one final thought.  Is it indeed gaslighting, are ARE you making mountains out of molehills?  I ask this because when I was new (long before I ever heard of the term "gaslighting") I had a tendency to do just that.  A little experience, and I was able to take things more in context.  
  20. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from TriciaJ, RN in new nurse /gaslighting   
    I sincerely hope you're not implying that all older nurses or only older nurses feel entitled or think they know more than they do.  Ageism is ugly.  
  21. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    At last -- a voice of reason!
  22. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    At last -- a voice of reason!
  23. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from NurseSpeedy, ADN, LPN, RN in Nurses with Attitude   
    Ya know what?  Both of these nurses were talking to an anxious family, not an entitled, belligerent or abusive family.  I would challenge anyone to be so yippy-skippy when the family is demanding steak dinners for everyone and the spouse is threatening to "take you outside and mess you up" if you don't ______" (insert absolutely insane demand.)
    Yes, we all need to be positive and set the tone.  But isn't there a little leeway between Nurse Nightmare and Nurse Sunshine, the company whore?
  24. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Lil Nel in Trials   
    I'm glad you have a lawyer and you're following their instructions.  I'm really glad that you have someone to talk to who is supportive of your feelings.  
    I don't know you, and I don't know your practice.  Not checking a blood sugar within 15 minutes (unless you failed to check it for several hours) is a "so what?" sort of mistake.  On an insulin drip, it would be a big deal, but not TPN.  Wrong fluids -- also probably not a big deal if you caught it within 20 minutes.  The insulin pump -- not sure I understand what the problem was there, if you overlooked that she HAD an insulin pump or what.  But it doesn't really matter to my point.
    My point is that more new nurse and nurses new to a particular job fail in their orientation because the established staff doesn't LIKE them than for any other reason.  Often times it's just because the new person is anxious and too focused on the tasks to take time to be LIKABLE.  I know this because I was that new grad who was nearly run out of my job and my career.  
    If people LIKE you, they will cut you some slack, even when the errors are huge.  If they don't like you, you will wind up in all kinds of trouble even for minor errors.  The takeaway is that you want people to like you.  So, while you are at work, you pretend to be an extrovert; you act as if you like everyone you encounter and are thrilled to see them.  You smile and say hi to everyone, every single time.  You take 30-60 seconds to ask them about their commute or their garden or their dog or their kid every single day, even if you don't really give a crap.  You introduce yourself to everyone until you are positive they know your name.  That's hard work, but it is part of the work of starting a new job.  
    Trust me, I don't like this either, but it's the reality.
  25. Like
    Ruby Vee, BSN got a reaction from Nurse Beth, MSN in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    At last -- a voice of reason!
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