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dianah ADN

Halo, statue??

Reputation Activity by dianah

Reactions Given

Like 46

Reactions Received

Like 49
Thanks 8

  1. Like
    dianah, ADN reacted to Cowboyardee in Adrenergic agonists cause vasoconstriction or dilation???   
    Different adrenergic receptors, different sites of action. Clonidine affects alpha 2 adrenergic receptors especially in the brain stem. Epinephrine affects all major adrenergic receptors (alpha 1 and 2, beta 1, 2, and 3) and contributes to both vasodilation and vasoconstriction at different sites. 
    Look up the various adrenergic receptors and what they do. They're a good deal more complicated than you appear to have understood so far.
  2. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Need help with manual blood pressure readings   
    Blood pressure readings don't sound the same on each person.
    Some are bounding in your ears, some you can barely hear.
    Agree, ensure your cuff is the correct size for the arm size, and that your stethoscope fits your ears correctly, and is positioned correctly (in your ears and on the arm).
    Just take loads of blood pressure readings, and you will become more familiar with the differences and will find the similarities.
  3. Like
  4. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Retired RN wanting to give back...   
    Hello and Welcome back!
    My take on what you are asking: should you come back and post?
    My answer: YES!!  Come to General Nursing, Nursing Student Assistance, and whatever specialties you have tucked under your formidable belt of experience.  Please share your thoughts and experience! 
    And, come to the Daily Diary in the Lounge (the "blue side," "BreakRoom," or off-topic area), and post what you are doing in your retirement, share your thoughts there!
  5. Thanks
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from Ct85RN in RCC Nursing Fall 2019   
    Hello all, this is just a reminder to not post names of anyone in your program (or potential program) ----- students or staff --- to comply with the Terms of Service.
    Several posts have been edited.
    Wishing you success in getting accepted to the program of your choice! 🙂
  6. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Retired RN wanting to give back...   
    Hello and Welcome back!
    My take on what you are asking: should you come back and post?
    My answer: YES!!  Come to General Nursing, Nursing Student Assistance, and whatever specialties you have tucked under your formidable belt of experience.  Please share your thoughts and experience! 
    And, come to the Daily Diary in the Lounge (the "blue side," "BreakRoom," or off-topic area), and post what you are doing in your retirement, share your thoughts there!
  7. Thanks
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from FutureRN02 in KCC ADN FALL 2019   
    Moved to School/College Programs area. 🙂
     
  8. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from Oldmahubbard in Nobody gets my credentials right   
    How frustrating!
    I suppose all you can do is remind people, over and over!
    A belated congrats getting your NP, and I hope it is as fulfilling a position as you had hoped. :)
  9. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Cath Lab position should I take it??   
    The first thing that popped in my head was: CALL.  You will be on call part of the time, which means more time away from your family.  You will need to pin down how often you will be on call (every third week, for a week?  Every third night?  Every other weekend?) and how often you can expect to be called in.  Some labs are VERY busy after hours, with STEMIs and transfers.
    That said, I worked full-time and covered call most of the time my kids were growing up, and we survived.  Dh had to pick them up and they had pizza for dinner sometimes.  So far they are OK adults. 🙂  And dh and I are still together.
    Might be good for you to observe in the Cath Lab, and pick the brains of those who work there.  MOST important, too, is having a supportive NM and a team that works together.  
    Hopefully others can think of more things to consider, too.  Good luck making your decision!
  10. Like
    dianah, ADN reacted to Ruby Vee, BSN in Needlestick accident   
    The fact that the OP is a new employee would account for some of the accident.  Perhaps the safeguards are adequate but the OP wasn't familiar with them.  She is certainly less than familiar with the layout.  
    In the olden days, before HIV, needle stick injuries were just a part of the job.  Nobody LIKED them, but they weren't the potential health hazard that they are now.   We've come a long way in reducing needle stick injuries since then, but as long as we need to use needles, I don't think we'll be able to eliminate them.  
  11. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Cath Lab position should I take it??   
    The first thing that popped in my head was: CALL.  You will be on call part of the time, which means more time away from your family.  You will need to pin down how often you will be on call (every third week, for a week?  Every third night?  Every other weekend?) and how often you can expect to be called in.  Some labs are VERY busy after hours, with STEMIs and transfers.
    That said, I worked full-time and covered call most of the time my kids were growing up, and we survived.  Dh had to pick them up and they had pizza for dinner sometimes.  So far they are OK adults. 🙂  And dh and I are still together.
    Might be good for you to observe in the Cath Lab, and pick the brains of those who work there.  MOST important, too, is having a supportive NM and a team that works together.  
    Hopefully others can think of more things to consider, too.  Good luck making your decision!
  12. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Needlestick accident   
    Things happen.  
    You work daily with needles, -- could say they are an occupational hazard!
    Sounds like you did the best you could explaining what happened, and why she needed to have labs drawn afterwards.  Her needle phobia is what it is.  You are not responsible for how she feels about the event.   It's too bad she had to wait so long at the lab, perhaps that could have been avoided (but then again, you are not responsible for the lab's policies and their patient flow).
     
  13. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Needlestick accident   
    Things happen.  
    You work daily with needles, -- could say they are an occupational hazard!
    Sounds like you did the best you could explaining what happened, and why she needed to have labs drawn afterwards.  Her needle phobia is what it is.  You are not responsible for how she feels about the event.   It's too bad she had to wait so long at the lab, perhaps that could have been avoided (but then again, you are not responsible for the lab's policies and their patient flow).
     
  14. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Need help with manual blood pressure readings   
    Blood pressure readings don't sound the same on each person.
    Some are bounding in your ears, some you can barely hear.
    Agree, ensure your cuff is the correct size for the arm size, and that your stethoscope fits your ears correctly, and is positioned correctly (in your ears and on the arm).
    Just take loads of blood pressure readings, and you will become more familiar with the differences and will find the similarities.
  15. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Need help with manual blood pressure readings   
    Blood pressure readings don't sound the same on each person.
    Some are bounding in your ears, some you can barely hear.
    Agree, ensure your cuff is the correct size for the arm size, and that your stethoscope fits your ears correctly, and is positioned correctly (in your ears and on the arm).
    Just take loads of blood pressure readings, and you will become more familiar with the differences and will find the similarities.
  16. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Need help with manual blood pressure readings   
    Blood pressure readings don't sound the same on each person.
    Some are bounding in your ears, some you can barely hear.
    Agree, ensure your cuff is the correct size for the arm size, and that your stethoscope fits your ears correctly, and is positioned correctly (in your ears and on the arm).
    Just take loads of blood pressure readings, and you will become more familiar with the differences and will find the similarities.
  17. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Need help with manual blood pressure readings   
    Blood pressure readings don't sound the same on each person.
    Some are bounding in your ears, some you can barely hear.
    Agree, ensure your cuff is the correct size for the arm size, and that your stethoscope fits your ears correctly, and is positioned correctly (in your ears and on the arm).
    Just take loads of blood pressure readings, and you will become more familiar with the differences and will find the similarities.
  18. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Needlestick accident   
    Things happen.  
    You work daily with needles, -- could say they are an occupational hazard!
    Sounds like you did the best you could explaining what happened, and why she needed to have labs drawn afterwards.  Her needle phobia is what it is.  You are not responsible for how she feels about the event.   It's too bad she had to wait so long at the lab, perhaps that could have been avoided (but then again, you are not responsible for the lab's policies and their patient flow).
     
  19. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from sirI, MSN, APRN, NP in Me and Mr. Smith and Waffles   
    He lay in bed in his wrinkled white hospital gown, surrounded by rumpled sheets. He was assigned an isolation room for a post-CABG sternum infection. But this was no ordinary infection. Mr. Smith was allergic to a gamut of antibiotics used to treat infections. The surgeons had thus placed two drains, one on each side of his sternum, trickling betadine solution in, then it drained out from the lower part of the incision. Saturated dressings were frequently changed, and many betadine stains dotted the sheets. He should have been home with his family by now but was held as a prisoner, alone in his room, by the infection and treatment. "No wonder he's grumpy," I thought as I moved toward the bedside table, dressed in full isolation regalia. I grasped his cardboard breakfast tray to my paper gown with gloved hands and peered at him over my mask, wondering what on earth to do for him or say to him at this point.
    Sliding the tray onto his bedside table, I began taking his vital signs and doing the morning assessment.
    "Perhaps you'd like to eat something your wife left for you," I suggested, glancing around the room at various small cereal boxes and treats cluttering the dresser and windowsill.
    He grunted and pointed to the tray, "So, what did they send me today?"
    I read from the menu, "Waffles and fruit."
    His eyes took on the smallest gleam of interest. "What do the waffles look like?"
    I pushed the tray close to him and removed the lid to reveal two thick waffles topped with a pat of butter, syrup in a cup on the side.
    His frown returned. "Those are waffles??" He pushed them away. "No, no, I'll have some cereal."
    While he ate I tidied the room, mentally taking notes of his condition. Later, shed of my isolation gown, gloves, mask, booties and bonnet, I could chart and see to my other patients.
    "Are you done with the tray?" I pointed to the now sagging, cold waffles.
    He waved a hand in dismissal and I carried the plate to the bathroom, to flush the offending food down the toilet.
    They fell in with a 'plop!' and I pressed the handle. Flushing sounds filled the little bathroom as I disposed of the tray and plastic utensils in the trash.
    Turning back, I was startled to see the two waffles slowly drifting around in the full toilet bowl.
    "Hmmmmm," I thought to myself. "They're probably soggy enough now to go down," and I pressed the handle again.
    I couldn't help watching their circular descent, circling faster and faster to the exit hole as the waterfall pushed them lower and lower.
    To my surprise they stopped at the bottom, without exiting the bowl, and as the water rose with the completed flush cycle, so did the waffles, turning lazily around the bowl. They had ridden the waves as easily as any whitewater raft.
    I began to giggle, then stifled it, not wanting to disturb Mr. Smith, who was now shaving at the bedside table.
    "I know what I'll do," I thought, and retrieved the plastic knife and fork from the trash. "They probably just need to be smaller and then they'll go right down."
    I leaned over the bowl, fork, and knife in hand, and stopped short as a thought struck me.
    "What if the doctor or the housekeeper were to come in? What would I tell them?"
    Then I REALLY got the giggles, imagining the look on the doctor's face as he caught sight of me, gowned, gloved and masked, leaning over to cut up waffles in the toilet!
    "What's going on in there?" Mr. Smith raised his voice over my giggles.
    I poked my head around the doorway. "Remember those waffles you didn't want?? Well, the toilet doesn't want them either!!" And the giggles started all over again. I even got a smile out of Mr. Smith!
    I finally got the waffles cut up small enough that they sailed briskly down the toilet with the next flush (and no one walked in on me performing that task).
    I have never looked at waffles the same since.
  20. Like
    dianah, ADN reacted to ruby_jane, BSN, RN in Needlestick accident   
    If it was your organization's policy that the patient be asked to submit blood after an occupational exposure, then it's not about you (or her, even). Hang in there and follow the OSHA occupational exposure protocol.
  21. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Needlestick accident   
    Things happen.  
    You work daily with needles, -- could say they are an occupational hazard!
    Sounds like you did the best you could explaining what happened, and why she needed to have labs drawn afterwards.  Her needle phobia is what it is.  You are not responsible for how she feels about the event.   It's too bad she had to wait so long at the lab, perhaps that could have been avoided (but then again, you are not responsible for the lab's policies and their patient flow).
     
  22. Like
    dianah, ADN reacted to brownbook in Needlestick accident   
    As Dianah said it's an occupational hazzard.
      I can't blame the patient for complaining about the wait. And you for not looking forward to seeing her again.
    It may make you feel better if you keep a gift card handy and next time you see her apologize and present her with a gift card to make up for the trouble she had to go through. You will know you have made amends. 
  23. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Needlestick accident   
    Things happen.  
    You work daily with needles, -- could say they are an occupational hazard!
    Sounds like you did the best you could explaining what happened, and why she needed to have labs drawn afterwards.  Her needle phobia is what it is.  You are not responsible for how she feels about the event.   It's too bad she had to wait so long at the lab, perhaps that could have been avoided (but then again, you are not responsible for the lab's policies and their patient flow).
     
  24. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from brownbook in Blast from the past...   
    Love old westerns!  Movies and the series: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Big Valley, Wagon Train, The Rifleman...  can spot lots of stars in their younger days, putting their time in.
    Also love M*A*S*H reruns.
    I do admit to sometimes keeping the TV on for noise, tuned to The Brady Bunch and The Love Boat.  Mindless fluff. 🙂
  25. Like
    dianah, ADN got a reaction from sophiemairx in Access to nursing interview.   
    Moved to Pre-Nursing.  Let us know how the interview goes!
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