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kbrn2002 ADN, RN

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RN from WI

Reputation Activity by kbrn2002

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Thanks 7
Haha 3
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  1. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from cinnamon19 in Nursing school has pushed me to the edge. Anyone else?   
    If there is somebody you can talk to please do. Even a very trusted friend or family member you can vent to is better than keeping those feelings bottled up.  Because it is obvious affecting your schooling negatively.
    Now for the tough love part.  Skipping lectures and showing up late for clinical can and very likely will cause you to be failed if it continues. The mediocre grades I am not as concerned about as long as you are maintaining a passing grade but be careful to not let them slide much more.  School is a relatively short period of time when you look at it in the context of the time you will be putting into your career.  
    One last reality check for you. Yes, school is hard with high expectations. It should be if you are going to graduate with the minimum skill set required to work as a nurse.  The first year or even two of work for a new nurse can be brutal so the stress you are feeling now might not be less  when you do graduate, pass the NCLEX and start working.  So if you are going to succeed, and you can please talk to somebody to help you through it.
  2. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from TriciaJ, RN in How to be a Perfect Nurse   
    Yes! That exactly. Every time a new "staff education" comes out you know that somebody screwed up.  Then comes the new policy for whatever the screw up was that invariably adds to the already way too much busy work we have. What ever happened to educating and if necessary disciplining the nurse who performed the error? 
    Plus the current model only draws attention to the fact that somebody committed an error of some kind that is resulting in additional work for all nurses. Not exactly good for morale.
  3. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from rn409 in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    I don't regret it though there have admittedly been times I've wondered why the hell did I want to do this for a living?   I work in a SNF and the workload and chronic short staffing occasionally gets to the best of us. 
    Before people start responding telling me to get out of LTC, no thanks. I work LTC by choice, not because I can't find an acute care job.  I am one of those nurses that has absolutely no desire to work in a hospital.  Though it sometimes drives me a little bonkers overall the rewards of working with the elderly are worth it to me. 
  4. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Here.I.Stand in Nursing instructor gave a Warning for being late to first day of clinicals despite emailing her? What should I do?   
    Well saying you could lose your license is over the top ridiculous. I mean really, have you ever heard of any licensed professional losing their license because they were late to work?  That's just a silly threat that makes it's difficult to take the rest of her comments in context. 
    On the other hand, you were admittedly late. In real world nursing stuff happens and being late occasionally isn't usually a big deal. School however is no where near real world nursing as you will eventually find out for yourself. In the school setting being late for a clinical is a very big deal unless and sometimes even if you have a great reason for being late. Providing a ride to school for your sister isn't a great reason by the way.  What you should do is humbly accept that warning, apologize profusely and make darn sure it doesn't happen again. 
  5. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from cinnamon19 in Nursing school has pushed me to the edge. Anyone else?   
    If there is somebody you can talk to please do. Even a very trusted friend or family member you can vent to is better than keeping those feelings bottled up.  Because it is obvious affecting your schooling negatively.
    Now for the tough love part.  Skipping lectures and showing up late for clinical can and very likely will cause you to be failed if it continues. The mediocre grades I am not as concerned about as long as you are maintaining a passing grade but be careful to not let them slide much more.  School is a relatively short period of time when you look at it in the context of the time you will be putting into your career.  
    One last reality check for you. Yes, school is hard with high expectations. It should be if you are going to graduate with the minimum skill set required to work as a nurse.  The first year or even two of work for a new nurse can be brutal so the stress you are feeling now might not be less  when you do graduate, pass the NCLEX and start working.  So if you are going to succeed, and you can please talk to somebody to help you through it.
  6. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Nurses with Attitude   
    Thank goodness I work in a SNF where that inane scripting hasn't been a thing, at least not yet.  While most of us don't go out of our way to complain about staffing issues, we also tend to not lie about it.  When a resident or family member comments about an obviously short staffed shift I will let them know that yes, we are challenged today. No point in lying about it when a shift is bad enough that they ask. 
  7. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from NRSKarenRN, BSN in Florida Board of Health Suspends Healthcare Licenses Over Student Loan Defaults   
    Problems with the student loan forgiveness program have been widely reported. It seems less that 1% of applicants are actually seeing the balance on their loans being written off after 10 years as promised.   Many of those people were fully expecting their loans to be forgiven and only found out after faithfully making those payments for 10 years that they were disqualified from the program based on some technicality.  There are actually a good number of law suits now against the loan servicing companies because of this. I'd expect those law suits to take years to reach any kind of resolution so what do people do in the meantime? 
    But loan forgiveness not working as expected is only a very small part of why student loans might not be paid off as easily as hoped.  Too many students find themselves in massive student loan debt with the ever escalating costs of education and they don't find jobs that allow them to comfortably make those large payments after graduation.  The inflation of cost of education has far outpaced wage increases. 
  8. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Here.I.Stand in Nursing instructor gave a Warning for being late to first day of clinicals despite emailing her? What should I do?   
    Well saying you could lose your license is over the top ridiculous. I mean really, have you ever heard of any licensed professional losing their license because they were late to work?  That's just a silly threat that makes it's difficult to take the rest of her comments in context. 
    On the other hand, you were admittedly late. In real world nursing stuff happens and being late occasionally isn't usually a big deal. School however is no where near real world nursing as you will eventually find out for yourself. In the school setting being late for a clinical is a very big deal unless and sometimes even if you have a great reason for being late. Providing a ride to school for your sister isn't a great reason by the way.  What you should do is humbly accept that warning, apologize profusely and make darn sure it doesn't happen again. 
  9. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Nurses with Attitude   
    Thank goodness I work in a SNF where that inane scripting hasn't been a thing, at least not yet.  While most of us don't go out of our way to complain about staffing issues, we also tend to not lie about it.  When a resident or family member comments about an obviously short staffed shift I will let them know that yes, we are challenged today. No point in lying about it when a shift is bad enough that they ask. 
  10. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Nurses with Attitude   
    Thank goodness I work in a SNF where that inane scripting hasn't been a thing, at least not yet.  While most of us don't go out of our way to complain about staffing issues, we also tend to not lie about it.  When a resident or family member comments about an obviously short staffed shift I will let them know that yes, we are challenged today. No point in lying about it when a shift is bad enough that they ask. 
  11. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from TriciaJ, RN in Nurses Call the Governor of Tennessee   
    Agree 100%. I am with Wuzzie on this. While what happened is sad and unfortunate it also goes way beyond a simple mistake.  Do I feel bad for the otherwise upstanding citizen that makes a mistake by driving under the influence and kills somebody? Of course I do as that person has to live with the knowledge of what they did for the rest of their lives.  Do I think that person should not face the legal consequences of that choice just because I feel bad for them? No, of course not.  
    A public trial might even bring out into the open in a forum that can't be ignored the circumstances the facility put her in that allowed such an error to occur in the first place.  
  12. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN reacted to Emergent in Nurses Call the Governor of Tennessee   
    BONs seem very inconsistent. They'll dish out equal punishment to a diverter (thief) of opiates and someone who got a DUI 10 years ago, who hasn't had a drink for years. 
    They wait over a year or more to sanction someone who caused a sentinal event,  but nail someone who improperly charted something. 
  13. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Nurses with Attitude   
    Thank goodness I work in a SNF where that inane scripting hasn't been a thing, at least not yet.  While most of us don't go out of our way to complain about staffing issues, we also tend to not lie about it.  When a resident or family member comments about an obviously short staffed shift I will let them know that yes, we are challenged today. No point in lying about it when a shift is bad enough that they ask. 
  14. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN reacted to Wuzzie in Nurses Call the Governor of Tennessee   
    I can’t answer that because I don’t have an opinion on what her punishment should be. I don’t know if I even care if she doesn’t go to jail at all but I believe she should, at the very least, face a judge and explain herself. The courts can decide from there. 
  15. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN reacted to mobaby in If you could give one piece of advice back when you were a new grad RN, what would it be?   
    I agree with all prior comments.   One I would like to add is Learn to say NO.  Although you need to be a team player, it is not your job to staff the floor 7 days/week.  You need your days off to recoup so when asked repeatedly to do extra shifts, know your limits.    
  16. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN reacted to Davey Do in Nurses with Attitude   
  17. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN reacted to Wuzzie in Nurses with Attitude   
    Couldn’t we find a happy medium between complete a-hole and company suck-up? 😉
  18. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from NRSKarenRN, BSN in Something new...   
    A big nursing success for me besides just some longevity in the career is my participation on various NCLEX writing/review panels.  It's been several years since I started doing this, I was initially recruited somehow by the NCSBN and have been going to Chicago for various panels about once a year or so. I can only participate on a writing/review panel once every two years but it's usually been the case that I've gone down for different studies on the opposite years.
    It's been a very rewarding experience. I've met nurses from all over the country plus a few from Canada now that the NCLEX is being implemented there. I've talked to nurses in every specialty imaginable. I've learned a ton both from the actual panel process and from interacting with my fellow nurses. 
    Trust me Pearson Vue takes the process of overseeing the test very seriously! The steps a question goes through before it's accepted as a test item is a long process with several check points along the way. Plus there are regular reviews of active test questions to ensure they remain relevant to current practice.  I can't say a lot about the actual process due to the multiple nondisclosure agreements I have to sign but it is ok to talk about the generalities. I did ask once about the validity of the dreaded (at least on this site) PVT and not too surprisingly they did say it doesn't work that way without really giving me too much detail.
    Being accepted into what I consider an elite group of nurses that are able to participate in the process of bringing the NCLEX to prospective nurses around the world is quite an honor and I am proud to be in that group.
    Plus going to Chicago is just an added bonus! It's a fun city with a ton of things to do. I've learned to always leave extra room in my luggage as I know I'll be shopping while I'm there. The Joffrey Ballet and the Chicago theater are within a block of where we stay so I've been to a couple of Broadway productions as well as the ballet. Millennium Park and Navy Pier are also within easy walking distance when weather permits. I'm not a big cold weather fan so I skipped that this last trip, Chicago in January is a little chilly to say the least! There is plenty of free time to get some sight seeing in while I am there. I am always happy when I get notification that I was accepted for a panel and am looking forward to the next one!
     
  19. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from NRSKarenRN, BSN in Something new...   
    A big nursing success for me besides just some longevity in the career is my participation on various NCLEX writing/review panels.  It's been several years since I started doing this, I was initially recruited somehow by the NCSBN and have been going to Chicago for various panels about once a year or so. I can only participate on a writing/review panel once every two years but it's usually been the case that I've gone down for different studies on the opposite years.
    It's been a very rewarding experience. I've met nurses from all over the country plus a few from Canada now that the NCLEX is being implemented there. I've talked to nurses in every specialty imaginable. I've learned a ton both from the actual panel process and from interacting with my fellow nurses. 
    Trust me Pearson Vue takes the process of overseeing the test very seriously! The steps a question goes through before it's accepted as a test item is a long process with several check points along the way. Plus there are regular reviews of active test questions to ensure they remain relevant to current practice.  I can't say a lot about the actual process due to the multiple nondisclosure agreements I have to sign but it is ok to talk about the generalities. I did ask once about the validity of the dreaded (at least on this site) PVT and not too surprisingly they did say it doesn't work that way without really giving me too much detail.
    Being accepted into what I consider an elite group of nurses that are able to participate in the process of bringing the NCLEX to prospective nurses around the world is quite an honor and I am proud to be in that group.
    Plus going to Chicago is just an added bonus! It's a fun city with a ton of things to do. I've learned to always leave extra room in my luggage as I know I'll be shopping while I'm there. The Joffrey Ballet and the Chicago theater are within a block of where we stay so I've been to a couple of Broadway productions as well as the ballet. Millennium Park and Navy Pier are also within easy walking distance when weather permits. I'm not a big cold weather fan so I skipped that this last trip, Chicago in January is a little chilly to say the least! There is plenty of free time to get some sight seeing in while I am there. I am always happy when I get notification that I was accepted for a panel and am looking forward to the next one!
     
  20. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Julius Seizure in Older Doctor doesn't think nurses should be in charge   
    Not that it excuses this old school doc's attitude, but think about that statement. There are sadly still people that don't believe women should be doctors.  That attitude was much more pronounced years ago and women entering medicine as doctors were few and far between.  Depending on how long she's been a doctor her road to getting that degree may not have been easy.  Imagine the attitude and probable bullying she got as a med student, probably one of a very few females in her program. She had to grow some very thick skin to survive and thrive in that environment.  No wonder she came out of it a little on the prickly side.
  21. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN reacted to HomeBound in Nurse Charged With Homicide   
    Thank you, Wuzzie.  For goodness sake....she isn't being charged with murder.
    And to whomever it was who said..."where is the precedent to charge her with this crime?"
    Um.....you do not need a precedent to charge someone with a crime. You simply need an incident that....oh....you know...BREAKS THE LAW.
    It's emotional and I get it. I just watched ZDogg, who I really think is an amazing person for what he does with his podcasts and such---and he is a RABID defender of nurses---he just did two rants on this, defending Redonda Vaught...
    His arguments were NOT legally based. They were emotional. "What about the smidgen of morale left in healthcare if we start making lethal mistakes a crime??"
    This isn't about emotion. This is about the law. In TN, "reckless homicide" is the same as in some other state that charges someone with "involuntary manslaughter".  The definition is the same. YOU DID NOT INTEND ON KILLING SOMEONE, but your actions were negligent to the point that the person died.
    Everybody agrees, no matter how they dance around it, that Ms. Vaught bypassed the BASIC safety protocol of MAKING SURE SHE HAD THE RIGHT DRUG IN HER HAND BEFORE SHE PUSHED IT THROUGH THE IV.
    How complex is this? I read the label twice. TWICE. Before I give anything. When I am in a procedure with a doc?  I put the bottle up to their face, and make them read it before I allow them to puncture the bottle. 
    I learned this as a student in my other healthcare job, when we would do myelograms and were sticking needles into someone's spine with lidocaine and oil based contrast material. READ THE DAMNED LABEL.
    I don't care if she was a nurse of 2 years or 200 years. She didn't afford that patient the basic rights of being sure of what drug she was being given. The patient died.
    The idea that you cannot slow the hell down and read a label while you are pulling from the pyxis...that you are literally running with your hair on fire FOR A CONSCIOUS SEDATION PATIENT THAT IS SITTING AROUND, BREATHING , NO DISTRESS---and you cannot take the time to read a label?
    That is the definifition of negligent, and according TO THE LAW, "reckless homicide" is when you are AWARE (and being a nurse, if she was not aware that every single damned drug she ever gives to anyone is a potential to be lethal...and she doesn't get it that she needs to....oh.....ASSESS EFFICACY....she needs to not be a nurse) that your behavior may endanger another, and you do it anyway.
    She was aware that even had she given Versed....the sedation effects on a person with a brain bleed (THIS WAS NEURO ICU, folks.) are profound and need to be monitored.
    "Horrible, bad decisions"  isn't that...oh....a mistake?  When I decided to rob that bank because my grandma needs her cataract surgery---and I don't hurt anybody---do I get a pass for having great intentions, but bad judgement and a bonus gold star for not shooting anybody?
    What people here are getting so hot over is that they don't feel that nurses  and doctors should be held to a higher standard.
    WE ARE, and WE SHOULD BE.  We are doing things to these patients that are incomprehensibly difficult and complex. We need to know what we're doing and why. Would you allow a Med Student to do your brain surgery???
    The excuses I am hearing is, she's a newbie. Then she shouldn't have been precepting. She shouldn't have been a float nurse (resource). 
    I know my limitations. I would no sooner get onto a chopper and pretend to be a flight nurse than I would going into the OR and pretending to be a First Assist.  I AM NOT QUALIFIED NOR AM I EXPERIENCED.  Ms. Vought, if the apologists here say that hey....she was just inexperienced. she didn't know.
    Did you learn the 5Rights in school? I did. I know she did. Then she knew. If she wasn't experienced enough to be a resource nurse, which seems to be something that nobody gets---you need EXPERIENCE to do that job. You need to be knowledgable on so many levels---and she was not. She should have known that....and I bet she did.
    I read a few of her NOW DELETED instagram and twitter comments about the dangerous life she likes to lead----"Rock out with your glock out"?? 
    Bad judgement goes from A to Z with some people. I don't even have a facebook page, let alone Twitter, SnapChat, Instagram...and I certainly don't publish my life for all to see---only to have to feel like I need to go an delete everything because now---the world gets to read my verbal vomit on the internet.
    Just because you passed Nursing school doesn't make you a wonderful human being, or one with good, trustworthy judgement. It's not a testament to ALL nurses---but nursing is simply a microcosm of humanity at large.
    There are good ones, and there  are not so good ones. She clearly didn't practice anywhere near the standards that are required of this positon.
  22. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from rn409 in Anyone else regret becoming a nurse?   
    I don't regret it though there have admittedly been times I've wondered why the hell did I want to do this for a living?   I work in a SNF and the workload and chronic short staffing occasionally gets to the best of us. 
    Before people start responding telling me to get out of LTC, no thanks. I work LTC by choice, not because I can't find an acute care job.  I am one of those nurses that has absolutely no desire to work in a hospital.  Though it sometimes drives me a little bonkers overall the rewards of working with the elderly are worth it to me. 
  23. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Sour Lemon in Nursing instructor gave a Warning for being late to first day of clinicals despite emailing her? What should I do?   
    As much as that sucks there is a valid reason for it.  There are a certain number of clinical hours which are required to graduate and to take the NCLEX.  Most programs don't have many extra hours built in to give students much of a cushion for missing any.   Few programs allow make up clinical hours unless it's for something that requires a whole group to miss a day, like a weather event.  They are not going to both arrange for a clinical site and an instructor for one student who misses too many hours. 
  24. Like
  25. Like
    kbrn2002, ADN, RN got a reaction from Daisy4RN in Gonna Quit: When Nursing Is Rough...   
    Therein lies the problem, or at least part of it. The myriad of jobs away from the bedside provides zero encouragement to actually stay at the bedside.  Instead of encouraging nurses at all levels of experience to bail out of bedside nursing as soon as possible we need to find ways to make the bedside tolerable so more nurses are willing to seek out and then keep those positions. 
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