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PamtheNurse

PamtheNurse BSN, MSN

Education
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PamtheNurse has 26 years experience as a BSN, MSN and specializes in Education.

PamtheNurse's Latest Activity

  1. PamtheNurse

    Mental Wellness: Where Do We Go From Here?

    BBear2102, I do hear your plea. Yet I must state the replies thus far to your article sum what I have found personally and in reading research. The one reply is of someone who is going into education to make a difference, and ideally, that is possible. However in reality pre-COVID nursing faculty working roughly one-third of the pay to a comparable hospital position and so short that schools did not admit nursing students (ANA, 2019). Now during COVID, they are working as they were in ground classes PLUS virtual with “frozen wages” because of the increased need for nurses. Data pre-COVID revealed average nursing faculty beginner lasted approximately 3 years (ANA, 2019), burnout is possibly a factor. So the common hospital situation of the revolving door exodus and a lack of experienced and knowledgeable staff is extending into nursing education. I do not know of published data yet of the number of nurses leaving the occupation since COVID, however, the reply of the nurse that is taking a break and considering retirement is something I have been seeing and experiencing. The reports of bias and efforts to oust older nurses despite the lack of experienced personnel are symptomatic of hospitals and education being run as businesses. The third reply above is of questions and hope for answers. I too am at that point. I am active in research https://allnurses.com/research-t736280 to explore the relationship between nursing faculty and their organization to burnout so that further intervention may be suggested. There was a reply to my posted article https://allnurses.com/are-you-someone-you-know-t736138/ that discussed the need for increased awareness and political activism associated with legal change. Possibly that could be the direction to lead to the reality of us all working together toward a healthy workplace and safe places of patient healing? Looking forward to other replies, PamtheNurse References American Association of Colleges of Nursing [ANA]. (2019). Nursing faculty shortage [White sheet Fact sheet]. Retrieved from https://www.aacnnursing.org/News-Information/Fact-Sheets/Nursing-Faculty-Shortage American Association of Colleges of Nursing [ANA]. (2019). Special survey on vacant faculty positions for academic year 2018-2019. Retrieved from https://www.aacnnursing.org/ American Association of Colleges of Nursing [ANA]. (2019). The impact of education on nursing practice [White Sheet]. Retrieved from https://www.aacnnursing.org/
  2. I messaged this for approval to go live on allnureses.com for my research data collection to begin. I am disappointed, I have not heard from anyone, nor has there been visible progress toward the goal of data collection. Is there some helpful action I might initiate to facilitate the progress? Thank you. PamtheNurse
  3. PamtheNurse

    Are You or Someone You Know Burned Out?

    All interesting and provocative thoughts!
  4. Dear Faculty, I am a doctoral learner under the direction of Dr. Ronnie Boseman in the College of Doctoral Studies at Grand Canyon University. My name is Pamela Newton. I am conducting a research study to study to determine: if or to what extent a relationship exists between collegiate nursing faculty members’ self-efficacy, perceived organizational support, and burnout in the United States. You can participate in this study if you: Are a full-time nursing faculty in the U.S. Have greater than one year of experience in nursing student instruction Willing to complete a 15-minute confidential online survey and answer personal questions about gender, program, and experience level not related to this research. You cannot participate in this study if you: Are not full-time nursing faculty. Are nursing faculty with less than one year of experience in nursing student instruction. Are not willing to complete a 15-minute confidential online survey and answer personal questions about gender, program, and experience level not related to this research. If you agree to be in this study, you will be asked to Complete a 15-minute confidential online survey and answer demographic questions about gender, program, and experience level. Your participation in this study is voluntary. All data in this study will be protected. No names, logins, or emails are required to complete this survey. None of the demographic questions asked can be tied back to a specific individual. To access the survey, please go to: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HKM8T8S. A link to SurveyMonkey Privacy Notice is https://www.surveymonkey.com/mp/legal/. Please feel free to forward this invitation to anyone you know that may qualify and be interested in this study. If you have any questions, please contact me at pnewton16647@my.gcu.edu. Thank you!
  5. Burn out? Me? It was me. Multiple times. And, recently yet again. After writing the two most recent allnurses® articles it became obvious to me that I was dealing with burnout. I, the one doing a dissertation on the topic, was burnt out. It is not a feeling. Or a fleeting thought. It does not go away with rest, a break, or a vacation. The effort to create a restful space or a break IS impossible. Yet the stressful surroundings, a head full of cotton, and an inability to think a way out of the box continue. Hopelessly working hard, and harder. Despite more and more that needs doing without reward. Thoughts of “I’m done” - yet not leaving - nobody cares what I do or don’t do? This emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment lending to the state of dreading work, lateness in projects and work arrival, failures in focus and memory, frustration, overwhelmed by negative and apathetic feelings – is it your colleagues? Or you? It was me. The difficult workplace factors for me were exacerbated by the COVID-19 required shutdown of the workplace and the associated workload not designed or ever intended to be virtual became virtual. Then the workplace became a hybrid of sorts with the virtual load remaining the same and was added to the pre-COVID-19 shutdown over-the-top workload. The resulting overload led to increased stress. I, the perfectionist, supporting multiple households, was working full-time and a doctoral student full-time. I burned out. I was one of the few surprised at the discovery. The many not surprised were close friends and family, I had been exhibiting burnout symptoms for some time. The previous thought was that burnout was associated with work and personality factors. Currently, Maslach and Leiter (Lubbadeh, 2020) describe burnout as a possible result of “any mismatch or imbalance between the person and the six areas of the job [workload, control, reward, community, fairness, values]” (p. 8). Have you seen or witnessed the run-for-the-hills co-worker reaction when a burned-out colleague is identified? Research has indicated “burnout can be contagious and perpetuates itself through social interactions on the job” (Maslach and Leiter, 2016, p. 106). In addition, there are multiple severe physical and psychological diseases including death associated with burnout (Lubbadeh, 2020). The stigma associated with burnout is real. Individuals are less likely to experience organizational and colleague support. Burned-out individuals who have left employment are less likely to be hired (Sterkens, Baert, Rooman, & Derous, 2020). Since it was officially identified in the 1970s research on burnout has been extensive. The resulting preventative and treatment actions previously suggested, then used and research investigated were of varied success. In the recent past and currently, research has indicated greater success may lie in the “interventions which [are] centered on the individual and the organization – individual-level interventions strategies to magnify the individual ability to cope with the workplace stressor. Organizational-level intervention strategies focus on overcoming or reducing organizational mismatch and stressor” (Lubbadeh, 2020). In view of this heartening researched treatment information, I am currently re-inventing myself with help using the research guidelines suggested. My re-invention efforts include my organizational workplace circumstances. In addition, I am closer to the point at which I will begin my burnout research. The research that I hope will shed further light on burnout as it has become a research-acknowledged genuine workplace crisis that results in debilitated workers and lost revenue (Lubbadeh, 2020; Maslach and Leiter, 2016; Sterkens, Baert, Rooman, & Derous, 2020). Moreover, I hope my research contribution will lend to furthering the effort of burnout intervention recommendations. I am happy to report that rather than saying soon as I have in the past regarding the upcoming survey invitation, I can now say it is on the way. It will be your chance to contribute and make a difference - watch for it! References Lubbadeh, T. (2020). Job burnout: A general literature review. International Review of Management and Marketing, 10(3), 7-15. Retrieved from econjournals.com Sterkens, P., Baert, S., Rooman, C., & Derous, E. (2020). As if it weren't hard enough already: Breaking down hiring discrimination following burnout. IZA Discussion Papers, 13514. Retrieved from IZA.org
  6. PamtheNurse

    A Writer's Learning Journey

    Julie, I appreciate your comment and support! My nursing and now journey in the education of nurses has been an interesting one to-say-the-least. In nearing the research phase, and therefore the end of my doctorate pursuit. I am looking forward to beginning a new chapter I hope it, the new chapter, will be not only interesting but exciting as well. Be safe, PamtheNurse
  7. PamtheNurse

    A Writer's Learning Journey

    Like the teen going to Summer camp, I have had on my journey the anxiety; did I bring with me what I needed? Yet I had, like the teen in Summer camp, the excitement of discovery while leaving behind the known and finding the new. The experiences gathered along the way were invaluable to my practice and my life. Yet wisdom is fleeting, and I have many more questions than I have answers. The most recent leg of my journey, my doctoral effort, has led me down paths both circuitous, narrow, and unexpected, but the learning has changed me in ways I could never anticipate. The writing of articles for allnurses was at first daunting and difficult, however, this became a part of the learning process. Also, it resulted in the realization of the joy of creation. Article #1 I started with The Overlapping Roles of Nursing Faculty article as I became aware of the challenges of nursing faculty shortages coupled with nurse shortages and the pressures to produce more nurse graduates such as expectations in fulfilling the nurse faculty role, the lack of mentorship, and the compensation at roughly 1/3 of hospital compensation for comparable roles. In that article, I spoke of possible coping, with an eye to prevention as I became more aware of the high risk of burnout for nursing faculty members. Article #2 My next article, Degree or Not Degree, That is the Question, was the result of my continuing interviews with experienced nursing faculty members. They reported and I began to observe the student perception of a successful nurse. For many nursing students, it was not working at the bedside, nor was it a calling to care for others. It was financial gain. There was much discussion in the responses to that article of the relative dedication to expertise and commitment of the nurse graduate intent on the immediate goal of a greater degree. Article #3 My reading of research of nursing faculty doctorally related and nursing students/graduates from the previous article with continuing nursing faculty members’ conversation regarding their frustrations led to the next article, What is Wrong with These Students? Millennial students were of primary discussion as the greatest challenge in accommodating educational efforts for learning. That article garnered some almost strident commentary. Also, the article commentary revealed some assumptions of the composition of prelicensure bachelor program students as opposed to other level programs. Article #4 The article after that one, Are Nursing Students Burned Out Before or After They Graduate? did not seem to strike a similar note as did the previous article although there was a commentary of skepticism of the existence of burnout in general as well as nursing students and graduates experiencing it. Also, the commentary did lean in the direction of burnout as a state of mind that can be prevented or resolved with a change in mindset rather than an understanding of the seminal and current burnout research that has established the Maslach Burnout Model as the gold standard. Article #5 The article, Burnout, the Literature, and Understanding, drew the least response. It was composed as an attempt to present what I had discovered in my doctoral pursuit as an understanding of burnout. An article-length response to the lack of burnout understanding that I discovered in the commentary of the article, Are Nursing Students Burned Out Before or After They Graduate? A synopsis of the commentary to Burnout, the Literature and Understanding, is difficult due to so little commentary. However, one wonders why so few responses? The tone of the article was different as it was a discussion of research literature as opposed to the previous articles that addressed issues current in the nursing faculty experience and maybe that led to less commentary. Which brings this article and this author to this point... What is this article’s purpose? It is to recognize the path taken as a teen does experiencing Summer camp; a door opening to the world. I experienced the input received, and the learning that happened with the participation. I wrote the articles with assistance at first to fledgling sole flight later; the learning was truly an adventure in the process. I am nearing the point of posting here on allnurses, the research invitation for participants. I can see the leg of this journey's goal before me, finally, as it has been long, however, I see learning as never-ending, bending, turning, and taking me down yet another adventurous path. Resources American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2019). Nursing faculty shortage [White sheet Fact sheet]. American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2019). Special survey on vacant faculty positions for academic year 2018-2019. American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2019). The impact of education on nursing practice [White Sheet].
  8. PamtheNurse

    Nurse Graduates, Nurses, and Nursing Faculty Burnout

    RN-to-BSN, COVID-19 has exacerbated the best and the worst. Thank you for your comment. PamtheNurse
  9. PamtheNurse

    Nurse Graduates, Nurses, and Nursing Faculty Burnout

    OUxPhys, I appreciate your comments. I and many others have stated similarly. However, nothing seems to be happening to alleviate understaffing. It has been thus for a very long time. The culture of nursing that supports the generalist training and the attitude behind the pride that all nurses can do and be all has to change. PamtheNurse
  10. Previous articles have garnered comments regarding graduate nurse proclivity toward advanced degrees and not remaining at the patient bedside. Graduate nurses self-describe as wanting to be the best, excel, and achieve the greatest compensation. In addition, there are those encouragements left from the Magnet programs (A new model, 2010; Drenkard, 2013; Stimpfel, Rosen & McHugh, 2014; Wolf & Reid-Pointe, 2008) for graduates to achieve degrees. The patient bedside care is comparable to primary health care. Primary health care is described as essential health care much like bedside nursing. Calma, Halcomb, and Stephens (2019) discuss curriculum, nursing student attitude, and perceptions, preparing them for primary health care workers. They discovered a focus on acute care in curricula that color the nursing student perception. Acute care curricula content and the encouragement to pursue advanced degrees is that having a greater impact? Is it truly a lack of awareness of essential healthcare career possibilities, therefore desire and confidence are lacking as suggested by Calma, Halcomb, and Stephens (2019)? Or could it be the student nurse experience that affects a nurse? When I was a student driver in a car with my driver education instructor (yes it was a long time ago), he pointed out to myself and the two other bored high school student drivers in the car that watching pedestrian reaction at seeing the student driver sign on the top of the car was indicative of their student driver experience. A smile indicated a positive experience a frown a negative one. Interestingly I noticed a reaction was universal despite age and gender. It has me thinking is it the same for nurses? Does their student nursing experience color their nursing practice or just their reaction when reminded of it? Or is it burnout? Burnout is defined in the ICD-11 as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions: 1) feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion; 2) increased mental distance from one’s job or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job; and 3) reduced professional efficacy” (WHO, 2019). As discussed in previous articles by this author, burnout was first researched and identified in educators and healthcare providers primarily nurses in the 1980s. Since burnout has been extensively researched and led to the identification of it in many work settings and roles. Additionally, the research has continued for those in education and healthcare. More recently, nursing students have been included. My own study is of nursing faculty burnout. The research survey will be available soon. I began this article with thoughts of nursing graduates, many of which who have expressed intentions of not remaining at the bedside but to continue their education. This author has previously posted articles on allnurses.com which have garnered anecdotal lamentation commentary of educating graduates to advanced degree levels taking them away from the bedside resulting in leaving future patient bedside unattended. Interestingly, research and data that established the advantageous use of bachelor prepared nurses at the bedside for the patient also gave impetus to the Magnet programs (A new model, 2010; Drenkard, 2013; Stimpfel, Rosen & McHugh, 2014; Wolf & Reid-Pointe, 2008). There is the research conducted by Calma, Halcomb, and Stephens (2019) that offers the possibility of nurse graduates simply unaware of primary health care or bedside nursing as a viable opportunity. Another thought offered is the student nurse experience affecting the nurse as a graduate and beyond. There is current research of the nursing student and burnout that begins during the nursing education experience. Also, research has linked burnout in nurses and nursing faculty to nursing shortages. Is burnout leading the graduates to seek further education to leave the bedside? Will future bedside nursing experience shortages to the extent that patients will go untended? Given we have experienced nursing shortages in the past and are currently experiencing nursing shortages, is this happening now? Your thoughts? 
  11. PamtheNurse

    Burnout, the Literature, and Understanding

    Susie2310, I have my own research I am attending at the moment. My topic is nursing faculty member burnout. Variables are perceived organizational support and self-efficacy. However, is this a study topic one you would want to pursue? You certainly have a grasp of the idea. A qualitative study would be an interesting one. Deciding design and analysis procedures is a bit down the road. First, a discussion of possible variables and then an investigation of previous research would give insight on proceeding. I am happy to be involved in the discussion of the possible variables. Your thoughts? PamtheNurse
  12. PamtheNurse

    What Is Wrong with These Students?

    Megan1977 & NurseLizabeeRN, I compliment the two of you. You both are obviously dedicated to your endeavor to educate students. It is a formidable task. My interest is in the experience of nursing faculty and the possibility of burnout. What are your thoughts on burnout and nursing faculty members? PamtheNurse
  13. PamtheNurse

    What Is Wrong with These Students?

    Lecturing is as much a science-based action as it is an art. One's artistic expression is as individual as is the art viewer's experience. With the lecture, the Instructor is attempting to convey the information the students' (hopefully) are attempting to understand and incorporate into their knowledge base for future use. That is the basis of their contract. The impediments to the completion of the contract are many, too many to be discussed completely here. However, just as an artist and the art viewer have an emotional investment in their contract so does the Instructor and student, and when the contract is perceived as violated so are the emotions. Hence an outburst such as the one above. PamtheNurse
  14. PamtheNurse

    Burnout, the Literature, and Understanding

    "I would be interested to know if the rate of burnout is higher in student nurses/nurses whose primary motivation for becoming a nurse is money, job security/status, family pressure, etc., versus those who are primarily motivated by wanting to care for sick people." Susie2310, Thank you for your question. I can imagine that a study of such would be fascinating. However, the difficulty would be in determining the population that would represent those nurses that are in the profession for the monetary gain only. Thoughts? PamtheNurse
  15. PamtheNurse

    Burnout, the Literature, and Understanding

    Arafelle, Thank you for your commentary. Tenure and the associated drawbacks have been a subject of conversation for many years in higher education. It is on the downward trend of availability for faculty, particularly nursing faculty members. If you are interested there is further information, discussion boards, articles, and research publication(s) regarding tenure at higheredjobs.com. PamtheNurse
  16. PamtheNurse

    Burnout, the Literature, and Understanding

    I am extending my gratitude to all of the article commentators and their observations. Burnout, or at least the subject of it and ensuing discussion has caused some consternation. Maslach et al. (1986) would be gratified to know that the study they initiated of burnout, and the continued extensive study conducted by them and many others in the intervening years continue to be a subject of discussion and concern. As demonstrated in the article commentary it is of serious concern in nursing. A concern that has been justified by many researchers of burnout who focused on healthcare providers primarily nurses and educators. My work is focused on the existence of burnout in nursing faculty members. Nursing faculty members are both healthcare providers and educators, yet there is little research focused on their possible burnout experience. I hope to bring attention to that gap and assist in filling it with my research. Research that will begin here in allnurses.com, soon. PamtheNurse Maslach, C., Jackson, S. E., Leiter, M. P., Schaufeli, W. B., & Schwab, R. L. (1986). Maslach burnout inventory, 21, pp. 3463-3464. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.