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NGjuice

NGjuice

New New Nurse
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  1. NGjuice

    Impella training

    That's what my facility did. We also did an online course prior to the in person class. The representatives were really good. We got to see one and play with it. I can also say, the impella people have been really supportive and helpful. We still don't use them routinely, so the representative comes out almost every time to make sure it's set up correctly. We all have his number to call for questions. There's also a 1-800 on the machine. They are super helpful and talk you through everything you could possible need. The down side in my hospital is half the doctors have no idea what to order for them or what lines to place for us to use after the procedure. We've had to place art lines after the fact so we can do our ACTs. We spend an hour getting the order set entered correctly. It's usually a 3-4 hour cluster any time one comes to the unit. And then the site ALWAYS ends up oozing. But, all in all, they aren't the worst patients I've had to take care of. And the company is very supportive. Hope that helps!
  2. NGjuice

    Charge nurse with patients?

    I've worked with a float charge, and a charge with a full load. Either can be okay. In small units of 8 or less, it's normally not a big deal to have a charge with patients. Larger units I think NEED to have a float charge. The more ICU patients there are, the more chance someone is going to go bad. It's good to have a float there to focus on helping. It can be tough when there are only two of you and one patient is crashing, but it's normally a rare occurrence. Fortunately my hospital has a collection of small ICUs (4 with 8 beds). We are starting to have a floater for all of them, and it is really nice. Otherwise, we can usually call one of the other places and they can help in a crisis.
  3. Just have a question about how things are done in other places. I've worked in several ICUs throughout my state. I am currently working in a CV surgery ICU. My unit is in a lot of upheaval at this time over being forced to work our shifts on a different floor, or "pulling" (everyone has a different term, lol). The trouble in my place is that nurses can only be pulled to "sister units". Sounds like a good thing on the surface. My sister units are the other ICUs and the CV telemetry unit. CVTL used to be almost exclusively for CV surgery patients. However, my hospital opened 4 new beds for overflow patients. In addition, our CV surgery volume has decreased. Now CVTL has 3-4 surgery patients at any time with mostly regular telemetry patients, medical, and even in-patient hospice patients. My hospital cannot keep it staffed because they keep CVTL without a CNA most nights. So they overstaffed my CV ICU to be able to pull us to work telemetry when they need to empty out the ER. That had been frustrating enough, but now that our CV ICU patient census is increasing, we need all our nurses in the ICU. The other ICU nurses can't go to CVTL because it's not their sister unit. So they are pulling an ICU nurse into CV ICU and sending us to work telemetry. Everyone is furious. Their latest reason for doing it is that "all hospitals do this." In my experience, pulling is normal. Being replaced is not. Certainly not an every shift occurrence. So, for all of you out there, I would like to know if you've experience a similar situation. Does this sound typical? Or is some indignation a reasonable response?
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